Job statistics

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Work-life balance can be elusive under the best job circumstances, but when you work non-traditional hours—whether you’re in a client-facing role, you have a busy season (hi accountants!), or you’re facing a big project deadline—finding time for the people and things you love can be even more difficult.

After all, early mornings, late hours, and limited breaks aren’t exactly conducive to balance. Still, it’s possible to carve out time for what’s important to you even when your work life seems crazy. And adopting one (or more) of these expert tips can help.

1. Rethink Work-Life Balance
If you feel like you can’t find any work-life balance thanks to your non-traditional schedule, rethink your definition of the phrase, says Samantha Ettus, a work-life balance expert and author of The Pie Life: A Guilt-Free Recipe for Success and Satisfaction.

“Work-life balance is not about having balance every day,” she says. “It’s about creating a balance that feels manageable over the course of time—a week, a month, a year.” The problem comes when you expect balance every day—and judge yourself accordingly. “That’s just not how life works,” Ettus says. “We all know there are days when you start at 7 AM and end with a client dinner at 10 PM.”

2. Set Boundaries When You’re Less Busy
Even the most demanding work schedule likely ebbs and flows—an off season or a time between projects. Take advantage of these slower periods to set personal boundaries, as much as possible, with clients and co-workers.

Will you have to stay later sometimes? Yes. Is an occasional 5:30 PM meeting inevitable? Of course. But in general, once you start setting boundaries, people will respect them—and it may be easier to keep them going when things pick up again.

3. Embrace Micro Actions
If your work schedule doesn’t allow for blocks of personal time, embrace what LoVerde calls “micro actions”—activities that fit into bits of time during your day that are so small it’s easy to discount them. Don’t.

For example, LoVerde says, maybe you can’t fit in a 90-minute yoga class when you’re on a project—but can you do 4 minutes of tabata? Or program your wearable activity tracker to remind you to take a 2-minute walk every hour and drink a glass of water?

Individually, those don’t seem like much, but when you add them all up, you may find you’ve gotten 20 minutes of exercise and downed 10 glasses of water by the end of the day. Not too shabby!

4. Think of Your Life as a Pie
Ettus recommends imagining your life as a pie sliced into seven pieces: career, children, health, hobbies, friends, community, and relationship. Write down how much time you spend on each slice (be honest!), and set a goal for each one.

If you’re already struggling to balance a couple of “slices” (say, career and children), adding five more can seem counterintuitive—but stick with us. “It doesn’t have to be a hobby that you do every day of your life—a once-a-month book club still contributes to balance,” Ettus says. “People who live in all of their slices are the ones who feel more productive and fulfilled, so make sure you set goals for each area.”

5. Become a Quitter
As busy as you are, you’re probably wasting time each day on things that don’t contribute to your work-life balance in a meaningful way. LoVerde recommends quitting the things that get in the way of what you want. Who among us hasn’t lost 20 minutes mindlessly scrolling through Instagram, when we could have been texting a friend or meditating?

6. Build in Rituals
The findings of a 75-year Harvard study show that good relationships are the key to keeping us healthy, happy, and successful. Of course, relationships may occasionally take a backseat due to a busy season at work. But if there’s no down time in your future, then you must build in ways to stay connected with family and friends, Mary says—and the way to do that is to build in rituals, such as FaceTiming with your kids when you miss bedtime or a daily lunchtime text with your partner.

“You have a limited amount of willpower every day,” LoVerde says, “so building in rituals that help you stay connected to what’s really important will help you when you have to work strenuous stretches.”

We can’t promise that you’ll be able to find the perfect work-life balance all the time. But if you follow this advice, you’ll be on your way to creating more time and space for yourself and those who matter most.

 

 

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/how-to-maintain-work-life-balance?ref=carousel-slide-1

HU 22 09 18

YOUTH in Newcastle and the Central Coast are suffering higher unemployment than the national average, with more than 16 per cent of the region’s young people jobless, the NSW Business Chamber has revealed.

While youth unemployment rates nationally have been suffering since 2014, the Newcastle and Central Coast region’s unemployment rate for people aged 15-24 sits at 16.2 per cent, well above the national average of just over 12 per cent, the chamber said in a statement.

In response to these concerning statistics, Apprenticeship Support Australia (ASA) has commissioned the second Skillsroad Youth Census. The Skillsroad 2018 Youth Census follows on from a successful survey last year and is designed to highlight the hopes, fears and general attitudes of young people as they transition from school to the workforce, with a special focus on regional areas, the chamber said.

In 2017, more than 13,000 Australian youth completed the survey, revealing below-average life satisfaction and sense of well being, as well as significant levels of stress and uncertainty about choosing career pathways.

The 2018 census aims to build on existing knowledge from last year’s report.

“This census comes at a critical time for young people in the Newcastle and Central Coast area … who are facing an employment crisis,” ASA’s Hunter and North Coast branch manager Jeff Cooke said.

“The Skillsroad 2018 Youth Census can provide unprecedented, evidence-based insights for our schools, parents and business into the necessary tools required to properly support our young people.”

The census takes less than 10 minutes to fill out and participating youth will be in the running to win their choice of either a $1000 gift card or travel voucher. Weekly prizes of $100 gift cards will also be released over the duration of the census, and participants increase their chances of winning by referring friends to complete the survey.

The Skillsroad Youth Census is open to all Australian young people aged 15-24 and can be accessed at: http://bit.ly/Youth-Census-2018.

The census closes on September 30, with a report to be released on 15 October.

Source: https://www.theherald.com.au/story/5647189/employment-crisis-newcastle-youth-facing-higher-jobless-rate/

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The prospect of returning to work after years away from my career was daunting. I faced a host of challenges: a lack of recent and relevant experience, outdated corporate skills, and uncertainty about my Baby Boomer place in a Millennial-focused world.

I still thought, however, based upon my early career success and an advanced degree in my field, that I’d get a great offer in no time. It didn’t happen. My strategy—jumping into a role that was the wrong fit (and later leaving), followed by picking up consulting gigs here and there and then trying to explain it all in a resume with gaps and changes—was failing. I needed a strategic shift.

So I changed everything, from how I was approaching the job search process to my end goal. As a result, I applied for and landed a returnship, with Goldman Sachs. (If you’ve never heard of it, a returnship is an internship for people returning to the workforce.) It enabled me to add current and substantive experience to my resume, and reset my career path so I could once again move forward.

Here are the six most important lessons I learned in my quest to get back on track.

1. Update Your Online Presence
Being a somewhat tech-savvy boomer, I had a LinkedIn profile.

But too many people have ones that are lackluster or outdated. If that’s you, place this at the top of your to-do list. Both recruiters and hiring managers use the site to find and screen candidates.

I left off dates for my degrees to minimize age bias, and truncated my experience to the past 10 to 15 years (I recommend you do the same!).

2. Network—Always
You may think that networking is just for young professionals who need to meet new people. That’s simply not true. It’s beneficial regardless of your age.

For example, I had a friend put in a good word for me, and I know that helped me to be considered for the role at Goldman.

Here are four things you should start doing (if you’re not already):

Periodically touch base with professional contacts. Be memorable by sending a personal note and an interesting article once a month.
Let the other person know that you respect their time by being specific when you have an “ask.” Say (or write): “I’d really appreciate your perspective—can we speak/meet for 15 minutes?” And then stick with that time commitment.
Extend your network. Ask your contacts to connect you with their contacts.
Follow-up with a thank you note, every time. Take it to the next level by offering to be of help if they ever need your perspective or expertise.

3. Make it Easy for People to Help You
If you’re asking someone to refer you, give them everything they need, so they can simply send along your details.

So, if you’re applying to a role at their company, this includes the job name, job number, your resume, and bullets outlining what skills and experience you’d bring that match the requirements for the role.

People are busy, and so if you give them a complete email they can simply forward, it’s a lot more likely it’ll get passed on.

4. Refine Your Elevator Pitch
When you’ve had a lot of experience, it’s important (though often hard) to be clear about your objectives.

What are your areas of expertise?

What type of role are you looking for?

It’ll be tempting to rattle off everything you’ve done in the past, or say, “I can really do anything.” But a long speech can be overwhelming for listeners—and can make you look overqualified—and unfocused. So, cut it down and zero in on one thing you want the other person to come away with. My rule of thumb is that it should be no longer than 30 seconds.

5. Practice Self-Care
Unreturned emails, closed doors, and rejection all sting. But, it happens to pretty much everyone, especially when you’re outside the “sweet spot” of hiring prospects.

There’ll be surprises for better and worse: People that you’d have bet would be right there to help aren’t; and people you barely knew will do all they can.

So, it’s all the more important to be kind to yourself: go the gym, meet friends, and see a movie! That stuff may seem frivolous when you’re job searching, but it’ll help you feel happier—and keep you from letting your identity be wrapped up in your professional life.

6. Pay it Forward
Once you’ve landed in your new role, do what you can to help a colleague or friend of a friend. It could be at work, like offering to mentor junior employees.

Or, it could be that someone contacts you seeking your advice. Remember how you felt when you were job searching and do your best to find the time!

And of course, when you’re hiring in the future, give those who’ve had winding career paths a second look.

After my 10-week returnship program ended, I was asked to stay on for another year—and I did, happily. When my role recently came to an end, leaving Goldman Sachs was bittersweet.

But one thing that made me feel better is that I knew I was ready to find my next, more permanent position. On this search, I have not only a solid and recent accomplishment to leverage, but all of the lessons I’ve learned the last time around, as well as some new and treasured Millennial friends.

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/the-6-best-job-search-lessons-i-learned-after-10-years-away-best-of?ref=the-muse-editors-picks-1

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FOR the first time, the Central Coast will be marketed to the world as a complete region.

From Wyee to Woy Woy and beyond, the Coast will not be picked apart into places­ of interest and major attractions. It will be recognised and marketed as a whole with plenty to offer local, interstate, national and international visitors.

NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian­ visited the region last week and said she was taken aback when briefed on the number of international visitors the Central Coast attracted.

“In the last year, the Central Coast managed to host 900,000 international visitors,” she said at the Central Coast Chamber of Commerce’s economic breakfast.

“That represents a 50 per cent increase in the last three years alone.”

This comes as Central Coast Council’s tourism, marketing and industry services agency AFFINITY briefed 100 Coast tourist operators­ on its findings from an industry survey and provided a marketing update.

The Sydney advertising firm was awarded a $1.6 million contract in July to market­ the Central Coast to the world.

At the briefing, AFFINITY’s chief executive officer Luke Brown detailed a current Facebook campaign, which included 21 local businesses, designed to promote­ the Coast and test the Sydney market to find the most appealing branding messages.

The company is testing “brand positioning territories”, including “Adventure, Nature, Escape and Discover”.

“Adventure” will look at the Coast’s active pursuits, such as Glenworth Valley and the Australian Reptile Park, while “Nature” will highlight the stunning landscape.

“Escape” encourages people to pursue a relaxed, slower pace of life, and “Discover” delves into new and enriching experiences.

AFFINITY conducted an industry survey and gathered data from 500 local businesses in the dining/entertainment, activity, retail­, accommodation, government and transport sectors. It showed 48 per cent of the industry associated the Coast with the beach, while 26 per cent were unsure as to what made the Coast unique.

The largest barrier for visitation was the Coast’s facilities at 49 per cent. The survey revealed the need for new and different marketing, in particular digital marketing of the Coast.

Crowne Plaza Terrigal sales and marketing director Emma Perham attended the briefing and said she was really happy the council was making tourism a priority.

“We are really excited and very supportive of the direction Central Coast Council is looking to take tourism and the focus being placed on it,” she said.

Tourism on the Central Coast employs over 12,500 people and generates over $900 million a year for the regional economy.

Source: http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/central-coast/tourism-agency-affinity-to-market-central-coast-as-a-complete-region/news-story/b03c6319010ac81c0da1be5de6932e07

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Central Coast Council’s Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Mr Rob Noble, officially stepped out of the position on Wednesday, September 20, handing over the reins to new CEO, Mr Brian Bell.
Mr Noble is leaving after two years as CEO at Wyong Shire Council and Central Coast Council, to return to his business and home in Queensland.
“I stayed longer than I originally intended, as I wanted to lead the new Central Coast Council through the amalgamation process, and support Administrator, Ian Reynolds, and our staff, in creating a vibrant and sustainable Central Coast,” Mr Noble said.“I am taking with me a lot of fond memories of the Central Coast.
“I have worked with some fabulous people and I am very grateful to have had the opportunity to work here,” he added.
Mr Bell has extensive experience in Local Government, spanning 50 years, including 12 years as General Manager of Lake Macquarie Council.
“Rob is leaving some very big shoes to fill,” Mr Bell said.
“He has led the transformation of two organisations into one Central Coast Council, and has created a solid foundation for the newly elected Council to build on,” Mr Bell said.
“I am looking forward to the challenge of continuing to lead the organisation through this transition period to the elected Council, while continuing on the excellent course Rob has set for us.”
Administrator, Mr Ian Reynolds, echoed these sentiments.
“Rob has done an amazing job, and it is due to his hard work and leadership, that this Council has achieved as much as it has,” Mr Reynolds said.
“He is a transformational, charismatic leader and has left a great legacy, and will be greatly missed by staff.
“He is without doubt one of the best CEOs I have encountered in all my years in government, and I thoroughly enjoyed working with him.
“Brian Bell is well equipped to continue and build on Rob’s work.
“He lives here on the Coast and has led an award-winning Council, Lake Macquarie Council, for a number of years.
“He has the runs on the board and the commitment to continue to make Central Coast Council the very best it can be,” Mr Reynolds said.
Parliamentary Secretary for the Central Coast, Mr Scot MacDonald MLC, also thanked Mr Noble for his leadership of Council.
“Mr Noble’s stewardship of the amalgamated Council has placed the region in great stead for the future,” Mr MacDonald said.
With the funding provided by the NSW Government, the new Central Coast Council has been able to implement the following major Wyong region projects: Disability Matters – Improved accessibility to natural spaces across the Coast, $800,000; Community Facilities – Access and inclusion upgrades to community facilities across the Coast, $580,000; and, San Remo BMX facility – New amenities, $640,000.
“The Council is now in a strong financial position to serve its community,” Mr MacDonald said.

Source: http://coastcommunitynews.com.au/2017/09/new-council-ceo-takes-control/

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MORE than a hundred jobs will be created after plans were unveiled this week for a new $23 million private hospital in Kanwal.

Healthe Care Australia, which runs Gosford Private and Brisbane Waters Private, has lodged a development application with Central Coast Council to build a brand new “boutique” hospital — Tuggerah Lakes Private.

Located opposite Wyong Public Hospital, on the corner of the Pacific Highway and Craigie Ave, the company says it will create 50 hospital jobs and include four operating theatres, 20 inpatient overnight beds, 14 recovery bays, six recovery chairs, and consulting spaces­.

It comes a week after Healthe Care Australia missed out in the private tender process for Wyong Hospital, which will remain in public hands ahead of a $200 million redevelopment later this year.

“Now that decision has been made by the State Government, it gives us greater strategic focus,” Healthe Care’s Central Coast regional manager Matt Kelly said.

“Our new hospital will be perfect for doctors to do both public and private consulting, and if there are no delays with the DA approvals process, we’ll be ready to start building tomorrow.

“We’ll be using a local construction company and anticipate the building will create 60 trade positions over the next 12 months before we hopefully see our first patients in mid-2018.”

Mr Kelly said the facility would cater for day surgery and short-stay patients for multiple specialties including orthopedics, gastroenterology, plastics, urology, general surgery and vascular­.

Wyong MP David Harris said the proposed hospital was a “vote of confidence” for the fast-growing region’s north.

“This is significant investment, and I welcome the high-quality jobs and associated employment and investment this proposed development will bring to Wyong,” Mr Harris told the Express Advocate.

Source: http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/central-coast/plans-unveiled-for-new-23-million-tuggerah-lakes-private-hospital/news-story/21ebcc57bd5cb314996fbfe989ad0886
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You’re ready to make a career move—maybe you’re looking for a new job, launching a side business, or eyeing a promotion. In all of these instances, boosting your personal brand can help you achieve your goal.

That’s because a strong personal brand is a carefully designed message that’s compelling and attracts the right people. It helps you stand out for who you are and what you do best.

You’re probably nodding along, because you already know all of this. You don’t need to be convinced how valuable personal branding is: What’s holding you back is the time commitment.

That’s why you have a LinkedIn Profile, even though you haven’t updated it since you set it up. After all, who can devote hours each week on top of working or job searching? Well, believe it or not, 30 minutes is all you need to take your efforts to the next level. Here’s how to spend them:

Minutes 1-10: Evaluate What Makes You Stand Out

The first thing you want to do is perform a self-assessment. This step is often overlooked, but it’ll be super helpful as you find your voice in a sea of professionals with similar experience.

This evaluation helps you have a clear vision of your USP, or “unique selling proposition,” which is just a fancy term for the value you offer to your target audience.

Here are some questions to get you started:

  1. What are you passionate about? You want to think about what excites you, and what things you truly enjoy doing.
  2. What are your core beliefs? This is important because it’s like a mission statement. It’ll help you relay your personal approach to getting things done.
  3. What are your top four strengths? This’ll help you share what you do better than anyone else, to set you apart from the competition.
  4. Are you a good leader or a good doer—or both? This is good to know because it’s a way to identify and highlight the kind of roles that complement your strengths.
  5. What do others say about you? Ask around! You may have strengths you’re unaware of, or talents you need to put more emphasis on so people know they exist.

To be clear, I don’t expect you to answer these questions with witty taglines. This exercise is to help you target your branding efforts. So, answer the question(s) that inspire you by jotting down notes, and honestly writing what comes to mind.

Minutes 10-20: Compare That to What You Already Have

Now that you’ve done some reflection on what you want to say, it’s time to see how it stacks up against what’s already out there.

If someone were to read your LinkedIn profile, tweets, or personal website, would they see messaging that points them toward the answers you came up with?

You might be thinking: Wait, I only have 10 minutes, that’s not enough time to read my whole website or review my LinkedIn line by line. But, here’s the thing, people who click into one of your social profiles or visit your website are probably going to spend a fraction of that time looking at it.

So, you want to look for things that shout what you do. On LinkedIn, that means moving beyond filling out the basics and adding links to media, writing posts, and getting endorsements for skills. On your website, that might mean building a portfolio. On Twitter, it’s about not just following influencers, but composing tweets, too.

This step is about comparing what you want to highlight to what you have and asking yourself: What’s missing? What can I add?

Minutes 20-30: Create a Schedule

Truth talk: Personal branding isn’t a “set it and forget it” kind of thing. Once you’ve figured out what you want your message to be and how you can share it more effectively, you’re going to need to start posting—consistently.

A helpful way to be consistent is to set a schedule that you can use as a guide. It shouldn’t feel like a chore, but if you’re anything like me, if you don’t schedule it, it could get back-burnered. All I ask is that you give it 10 minutes a day!

Here’s an example of a schedule you can start with:

  • Monday: Make (or update) a list of people you’d like to engage with more (a former manager) or simply connect with (an industry influencer).
  • Tuesday: Reach out to someone from that list. If it’s someone you’re reconnecting with, try one of these ideas. If it’s a stranger, you can test out this Twitter trick, or, if you’re brave, just send a cold LinkedIn invite using these templates.
  • Wednesday: Spend time looking for industry-related articles in publications popular in your field and share one. Or, alternatively, comment on someone else’s post (or at a minimum, share it).
  • Thursday: Make (or update) your list of improvements you’d like to make to your online presence. Break it down into baby steps. For example, you wouldn’t write, “Build personal site.” You’d write, “Look into site designers” and “write copy for personal site bio.”
  • Friday: Spend today looking yesterday’s list and knocking just one thing off.

Of course, you can tailor your plan to whatever works best for you. Honestly, if you just do the five things above even once a month, you’ll see traction. Regardless of the schedule you choose, feel free to switch it up, and see what gets the best response. You won’t see results overnight, but, that’s OK.

My final piece of advice is to avoid being misled by the term “personal branding.” What I mean is: The most successful brands aren’t just about you. Take the time to know your target audience, and listening to what’s on their minds as well. Genuinely connect and build relationships! As best-selling author Dale Carnegie said, “To be interesting, be interested.”

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/how-to-create-a-personal-branding-plan-in-30-minutes-even-if-you-hate-personal-branding?ref=carousel-slide-1

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Investing in regional cities’ economic performance makes good sense. Contrary to popular opinion, new research out Monday shows regional cities generate national economic growth and jobs at the same rate as big metropolitan cities. They are worthy of economic investment in their own right – not just on social and equity grounds.

However, for regional cities to capture their potential A$378 billion output to 2031, immediate action is needed. Success will see regional cities in 2031 produce twice as much as all the new economy industries produce in today’s metropolitan cities.

 Drawing on lessons from the UK, the collaborative work by the Regional Australia Institute and the UK Centre for Cities spotlights criteria and data all Australian cities can use to help get themselves investment-ready.
Build on individual strengths

The Regional Australia Institute’s latest work confirms that city population size does not determine economic performance. There is no significant statistical difference between the economic performance of Australia’s big five metro cities (Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth and Adelaide) and its 31 regional cities in historical output, productivity and participation rates.

So, regional cities are as well positioned to create investment returns as their big five metro cousins. The same rules apply – investment that builds on existing city strengths and capabilities will produce returns.

No two cities have the same strengths and capabilities. However, regional cities do fall into four economic performance groups – gaining, expanding, slipping, and slow and steady. This helps define the investment focus they might require.

For example, the report finds Fraser Coast (Hervey Bay), Sunshine Coast-Noosa and Gold Coast are gaining cities. Their progress is fuelled by high population growth rates (around 2.7 per cent annually from 2001 to 2013). But stimulating local businesses will deliver big job growth opportunities.

Similarly, the expanding cities of Cairns, Central Coast and Toowoomba are forecast to have annual output growth of 3.2 per cent to 3.9 per cent until 2031, building on strong foundations of business entries. But they need to create more high-income jobs.

Geelong and Ballarat have low annual population growth rates of around 1.2 per cent to 1.5 per cent. They are classified as slow and steady cities. But their relatively high creative industries scores, coupled with robust rates of business entries, means they have great foundations for growth. They need to stimulate local businesses to deliver city growth.

But if there’s no shared vision, or local leaders can’t get along well enough to back a shared set of priorities, or debate is dominated by opinion in spite of evidence, local politics may win the day. Negotiations to secure substantial city investment will then likely fail.

The federal government’s Smart Cities Plan has identified City Deals as the vehicle for investment in regional cities.

This collaborative, cross-portfolio, cross-jurisdictional investment mechanism needs all players working together (federal, state and local government), along with community, university and private sector partners. This leaves no place for dominant single interests at the table.

Clearly, the most organised regional cities ready to deal are those capable of getting collaborative regional leadership and strategic planning.

For example, the G21 region in Victoria (including Greater Geelong, Queenscliffe, Surf Coast, Colac Otway and Golden Plains) has well-established credentials in this area. This has enabled the region to move quickly on City Deal negotiations.

Moving past talk to be investment-ready

There’s $378 billion on the table, but Australia’s capacity to harness it will depend on achieving two key goals.

  • First, shifting the entrenched view that the smart money invests only in our big metro cities. This is wrong. Regional cities are just as well positioned to create investment returns as the big five metro centres.
  • Second, regions need to get “investment-ready” for success. This means they need to be able to collaborate well enough to develop an informed set of shared priorities for investment, supported by evidence and linked to a clear growth strategy that builds on existing economic strengths and capabilities. They need to demonstrate their capacity to deliver.

While there has been much conjecture on the relevance and appropriateness of City Deals in Australia, it is mainly focused on big cities. But both big and small cities drive our national growth.

Source: https://www.domain.com.au/news/bust-the-myths-about-regional-australian-cities-and-look-beyond-the-8216big-58217-for-a-378-billion-return-20170626-gwydu0/

 

1

When are you most motivated at work?

Is it coming back from a long vacation? On Mondays after a great Sunday with friends? Or, Fridays when you have a relaxing weekend in store? Is it when you’ve just gotten great feedback from your boss, or had an especially productive meeting?

Chances are it’s a combination of all of the above—and science agrees with you.

More specifically, I’m saying that happier people get more done, and get it done better than most. In fact, a 2015 study at the University of Warwick in the UK found that they’re precisely 12% more productive than the average individual.

In order to test this, participants in the study were either “shown a comedy movie clip or treated to free chocolate, drinks, and fruit” during the experiment, while “others were questioned about recent family tragedies, such as bereavements” to see if emotions played a part in productivity.

This finding may not surprise you—but the alternative might. According to Harvard Business Review, unhappy people are not only less productive than the average individual, they’re costly for companies. To quote HBRauthors Emma Seppala and Kim Cameron:

“In studies by the Queens School of Business and by the Gallup Organization, disengaged workers had 37% higher absenteeism, 49% more accidents, and 60% more errors and defects. In organizations with low employee engagement scores, they experienced 18% lower productivity, 16% lower profitability, 37% lower job growth, and 65% lower share price over time.”

What does this mean for you? For one thing, it’s crucial to not just like your job, but for it to make you happy. And being happy isn’t about the perks, or benefits, or money, but about finding a career that makes you feel fulfilled every day and like you’re contributing to something bigger than yourself.

I know—cheesy—but it’s true!

On the other hand, it also means companies should be investing more in employee happiness—whether that means encouraging flexible schedules or team bonding activities—if they plan on being profitable and sustainable in the long run.

Either way, it’s clear happiness is a big player in success for both companies and employees—and if we set our sights on it, we might be surprised with the result.

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/its-true-happy-people-are-just-more-productive?ref=carousel-slide-3

1

Did you take the job to make friends? No, probably not. That would be quite low on the list of good reasons to accept an offer.

But having them sure is a perk, isn’t it?

Working with people you like can literally help power you through the day.

And in case you think this is an exaggeration and that work pals are just good for grabbing a beer with at the end of a long week, take this statement about the crucial nature of work friends from the infographic below: “Office friendships have a direct link with engagement and productivity.”

The infographic is, in fact, full of insightful nuggets, but as someone who values your work friends, you probably won’t be too surprised at the findings.

Those seemingly pointless conversations you have with co-workers while waiting for the coffee to finish brewing or on your way to a meeting? They’re not nothing. In fact, the data shows that having friends at the office can actually help your career.

A few minutes of non-work related banter can be viewed as a distracting force, or it can be seen as an engagement-enhancing break. So, it’s not just your social life that stands to benefit from these relationships but your professional life, too.

Think about it: When you’re in good spirits, you’re likely to find it easier to complete your to-do list—from the tedious, mundane tasks to the ones that require more creative energy.

You don’t have to have a best friend—though if you’re lucky enough to have a work BFF , well then, you may be one of the 50% of people who say that it’s resulted in having a strong connection with the company .

But just having any friends means you’re likely to be happier at work, and if you’re happy, you’re engaged, and when you’re engaged, you produce better work. You open yourself up to challenges. And maybe you even propose new and exciting ideas to your boss, bolstered by your co-workers’ praise and encouragement.

The fact is, the workday can be long and exhausting, so it really helps if you’re surrounded by people who you actually enjoy. What’s more: “The more friendly you are with the people you see every day, the happier you’ll be,” explains Muse writer Kaitlyn Russell .

So, the next time you catch yourself not doing your work and instead chatting with a colleague, go ahead and pat yourself on the back for cultivating those work relationships. It means you’re going places.

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/you-need-to-have-friends-at-work-if-you-care-about-succeeding?ref=carousel-slide-4

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TAX cuts for small business, reducing tax on superannuation for low income earners and new initiatives for youth unemployment are the key measures in the 2016 Federal Budget delivered last night by Treasurer Scott Morrison.

Central Coast federal Liberal MPs Karen McNamara (Dobell) and Lucy Wicks (Robertson) both said the Budget would drive jobs and growth across the region, but won’t deliver much in the way of new infrastructure for the region or tax cuts for the majority of local workers with an average wage of about $47,000.

Mrs McNamara said the youth unemployment initiative Youth Jobs PaTH (Prepare-Trial-Hire) would have a big impact in the region.

“Youth unemployment is a major issue on the Central Coast and one I have focused on in an effort to create opportunities for the area,” she said.

The program will see job seekers aged under 25 given pre-employment training for up to six weeks, internship placements for up to 12 weeks with a $200 fortnightly incentive payment and a bonus wage subsidy for employers who hire young workers.

It will complement existing employment incentives like Work for the Dole and the New Enterprise Incentive Scheme.

The 13,100 small businesses in Dobell and 15,226 in Roberston will gain access to tax concessions while 22,700 people earning $37,000 or less a year in Dobell and 21,600 in Robertson will pay no tax on money they contribute to superannuation.

About 2140 average wage earners in Dobell and 2500 in Robertson will not be pushed into the 37 per cent marginal tax rate this financial year after the government increased the middle tax bracket threshold from $80,000 to $87,000.

“I’m thrilled to see how the focus of this tax plan backs hardworking families and businesses in my electorate,” Mrs Wicks said.

“It will also drive jobs and growth across the country with real benefits for thousands of individuals and businesses on the Central Coast.”

Robertson Labor candidate Anne Charlton labelled the Budget as “devastating” for Coast families with huge cuts to health, education and skills.

“Mr Turnbull said that this is a plan for jobs and growth, but it is really a plan for cuts and unfairness,” Ms Charlton said.

She said with the average wage in Robertson being $47,000 the majority of people in the electorate would miss out on tax relief.

“Someone earning $1 million will get an extra $16,000 in their pocket while three out of four Australians, including many in the Central Coast, will get nothing,” she said.

“This Budget has at its core the old Tony Abbott cuts to schools, cuts to Medicare and cuts to families that will increase the cost of living.

“For the majority of people in Robertson this is a Budget all about what you don’t get, not what you do.”

Source: Central Coast Gosford Express Advocate

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There are mixed messages in the November unemployment figures.

Seasonally adjusted, the Bureau of Statistics show a total of 40,800 part-time jobs and 1,800 full-time jobs were added to the economy but the national unemployment rate has gone to a 12-year high at 6.3 per cent.

The Central Coast of NSW sits just above the national average at 6.7 per cent.

JobsOnTheCoast.com.au’s David Smeeth said the figures showed that many of the full-time positions had gone to those already in work.

“This shows there is still the chance for the people with the right skills and experience to get ahead,” he said.

“This is positive news, but worrying aspects are the number of part-time jobs, pointing to a growing level of underemployment, and youth unemployment continues to creep higher.

“Underemployment is often a ‘make-do’ job and not the career and development of specialised skills that is typically available in full-time work.

“Employability is always a combination of skills and experience, and part-time work provides limited levels of both.”

Mr Smeeth said youth unemployment was a structural problem that needed policies and attention at the three levels of government in co-operation with suitable industries.

“There is often comment that people should be prepared to move to get work, but the success of JobsOnTheCoast.com.au and its focus on jobs on the Central Coast shows that people want to work where they are committed for lifestyle, family and social reasons,” he said.

The JobsOnThe Coast.com.au website was created to enable people to find work and advancement in their local area, where they have the local knowledge and infrastructure to support them through the transition, he said.

JobsOnTheCoast.com.au aims to be a one-stop employment and skills marketplace for the Central Coast, whether it’s looking for a new or better job or being in the market to hire new talent and experience through its sister-site, SkillOnTheCoast.com.au.

The website can be viewed at www.jobsonthecoast.com.au and businesses that want to find out more can contact David on 0419 168 177 or by email on david.smeeth@jobsonthecoast.com.au

Click here to view the Central Coast Weekly Update 11th August 2014

Here is this week’s video update from Tim O’Brien (Founder of JobsOnTheCoast.com.au) relating to the Central Coast employment market.

Distributed every Monday, we hope these updates will be of interest and benefit to local businesses and job seekers.  To view this week’s (approximately 90 second) video on our YouTube channel, simply click the following link …

Central Coast Weekly Update – 11th August 2014


Click here to view the Central Coast Weekly Update 4th August 2014

Tim O’Brien (Founder of JobsOnTheCoast.com.au) has released the first in a new series of personal weekly video updates relating to the Central Coast employment market.

Distributed every Monday, we hope these updates will be of interest and benefit to local businesses and job seekers.  To view this week’s 90 second video on our new YouTube channel, simply click the following link …

Central Coast Weekly Update – 4th August 2014

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Local jobs website JobsOnTheCoast.com.au has expanded to make it more useful to look for specific skills and provide a forum for those who want to advertise their skills.

SkillsOnTheCoast.com.au was launched for the Central Coast region on Thursday to let employers know there are those with skills and experience or in training and they are on the jobs market.

The value for employers is they can “shop” for the skills they want to recruit for free on the same website.

“Employers looking to recruit usually have to advertise a position then sort through many hopefuls as well as those who have the experience or skill in demand,” said JobsOnTheCoast Founder Tim O’Brien.

“This new site will allow them to see who is out there looking for work, advancement or a career change based on their abilities.”

Mr O’Brien said the changing jobs climate meant that some industries were retrenching people with experience and skills. These people can now list individually on SkillsOnTheCoast to be seen by potential employers.

The site has been developed because of feedback from employers and from those who want to “put themselves out there” to potential hirers.

As it gains momentum, it has the potential to save the money and time normally associated with recruitment, especially when specialised experience and skills are involved.

It has drawn support from NSW Trade and Investment, Regional Development Australia, Central Coast and HunterNet.

Negotiations are proceeding with other partners including service providers (employment and training) who are interested in a presence on the site.

Mr O’Brien said the same philosophy behind the success of the jobs website would apply, namely that people want to work in the region where they live so they look to find work, advancement or skills improvement locally.

“By bringing people with skills together on the one site, it affords those individuals and their potential employers more scope” he said.

These people have skills and experience that the Central Coast needs to retain, in order to be competitive with regions and to ensure there is a speedy return to prosperity when the economy turns around, he said.

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The success of locality-based jobs website JobsOnTheCoast.com.au has prompted expansion interstate to Queensland’s Sunshine Coast.

The founder of the now three websites, Mr Tim O’Brien, launched the Queensland operation at a ceremony on the TAFE campus at Mooloolaba attended by 100 people from government, industry, training and recruitment sectors.

The Queensland operation is headed by Regional Manager Anthony Dow, who was CEO of Regional Development Australia on the NSW Central Coast before a move to Queensland two years ago.

“After being at the launch on the Central Coast while CEO of Regional Development Australia, it is such a pleasure to be leading the rollout of this third site,” said Mr Dow.

Mr O’Brien started the first website on the NSW Central Coast more than three years ago and replicated the operation in the Hunter about 21 months ago.

“The success is built on a simple premise,” Mr O’Brien said, “People choose where they want to live for all sorts of lifestyle reasons – and they want to work as close to home as possible.”

Illustrating the success of the two sites has been the growth in the number of on-line jobs, with the Central Coast site topping out at more than 300 and to Hunter listing about 450 vacancies in its peak season.

The site is supported by business partners who provide services for jobseekers and employers as well as training and skill development.

The aim is to make it the definitive site for advice and guidance for all matters related to finding work or recruiting.

Mr O’Brien said as well as expansion to the third region there was a continuous process of refinement to improve the websites for those looking for work or advancement and those seeking to hire.

 “Feedback from the growing army of users is monitored so we can make adjustments and improvements,” he said.

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It’s well known that those who land jobs in the McDonald’s restaurant chain learn important workplace skills, especially for careers in the hospitality and service sectors.

Less known is the fact that the restaurant chain provides work opportunities for many people with a disability, injury or health condition that are so often a barrier to employment.

On the Central Coast, disabilities employment agency Job Centre Australia Ltd. (JCAL) has been working since August 2011 with the Saronbell Group of McDonald’s restaurants headed by Ron Mussali.

This has enabled JCAL to place 207 people with a disability, injury or health condition into the Group’s 10 Central Coast restaurants.

JCAL General Manager – Operations Brian Yates said the alliance had enabled these 200 people to gain valuable skills, building confidence and self-esteem in an environment that values diversity.

“McDonald’s great reputation for training and customer service has given these jobseekers the opportunity needed to build a career in today’s competitive job market,” Mr Yates said.

JCAL have been successfully placing people with employment barriers in work on the Central Coast for more than 23 years.

Despite the Central Coast unemployment rate of about 8 per cent on the June quarter, JCAL placed 173 people with a disability into sustainable jobs in the open workforce last year alone.

“Because of our continued focus on emphasising a person’s abilities, we expect JCAL will help many more people to get jobs in 2014,” Mr Yates said.

JCAL has Central Coast offices at Gosford, The Entrance, Woy Woy and Wyong to serve the needs of both employers and jobseeker with a disability, injury or health condition.

JCAL has also renewed its business partnership with JobsOnTheCoast.com.au, the Central Coast-based website, focused on local jobs and career opportunities.

JobsOnTheCoast Chairman Tim O’Brien said the relationship with an agency of the reputation and performance of JCAL had been a cornerstone to the website’s success since it began in 2011.

“We share a commitment to local employment and social equity on the Central Coast, so our business partnership has been a natural fit,” Mr O’Brien said.

Mr Yates said: “As a major partner of Jobs on the Coast since its inception, it has been great to be part of the growth of the site and to gain the benefits of better profile, business connections and recruitment opportunities provided by JobsOnTheCoast.”

Image: Brian Yates, General Manager Job Centre Australia (right) and Tim O’ Brien, Founder/Chairman of JobsOnTheCoast.com.au (left)

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The on-line jobs website jobsonthecoast.com.au has bucked the trend of higher unemployment.

The website that started in 2011 has grown to regularly list around 200 local jobs per week.

Its sister-site on the Hunter Region shows a similarly buoyant result with about 450 jobs listed, making a combined total of 650 jobs across the two regions.

JobsOnTheCoast and JobsInTheHunter CEO Tim O’Brien said the lift of 0.1 per cent in the national figure of registered unemployed to 5.8 per cent was in line with expectations.

“But it’s clear that employers are looking for new and better ways to fill their vacancies and our websites, where employers can advertise and self-manage their vacancies for free, have grown traction rapidly over the year,” he said.

The site also welcomes use by recruitment agencies and employment service-providers as an additional resource for them in fulfilling their client needs.

Mr O’Brien said there were some signs that seasonal employment in retail would start to lift over coming weeks.

The lift in the number of vacancies corresponded with greater volumes of visitors looking through the lists of jobs.

Hits to the combined Hunter and Central Coast sites are almost 89,000 a month, a rise of almost 60 per cent on August last year.

“Jobs growth is a stated priority of the new federal government and changing dynamics in the regional economies ensure there will be continued interest in jobsonthecoast.com.au and jobsinthehunter.com.au,” Mr O’Brien said.

Picture: CEO Tim O’Brien