Lifestyle

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Young people are being asked to get involved and be a part of developing the first-ever Central Coast Youth Strategy.

As part of developing the Strategy, Central Coast Council wants to hear from young people and local youth services about what they see as important for young people who live, work or study on the Coast.

Throughout October and November, all young people aged 12-24 can complete an online survey which explores their views about life on the Central Coast and what they would like to see for young people, now and in the future.

The online survey will be complemented by face-to-face interviews at popular youth venues, events and schools, including focus groups with youth service providers.

Young people aged 12-24 make up 15.3% of the Coast’s population and Council is committed to shaping the new Youth Strategy so that it the concerns and they face.

To ensure as many young people as possible get involved, everyone who completes the online survey can enter the draw to win an iphone X.
Source: https://www.centralcoast.nsw.gov.au/council/news/young-people-to-shape-coasts-first-regional-youth-strategy

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A $1-million shared pathway at Norah Head, and a $1.5-million cultural hub at Wyong are among six Central Coast community projects to win state government funding.

Parliamentary Secretary for the Central Coast, Scot MacDonald, said $5 million had been granted to Central Coast Council in the second round of the Stronger Country Communities Fund.

The six community projects to win funding on the Central Coast are.-

a shared pathway, Norah Head ($995,700);
outdoor water park at Peninsula Leisure Centre, Woy Woy ($850,000);
establishment of the Wyong Cultural Hub, Wyong ($1,500,000);
construction of a clubhouse at Don Small Oval, Tacoma ($259,000);
a shared pathway, Tuggerawong ($542,269); and
amenities upgrade of Adelaide Street Oval, Tumbi Umbi ($908,616).

Mr MacDonald said he was pleased to see a wide range of recreation activities supported across the Central Coast.

“The establishment of the Wyong Cultural Hub will provide a centralised and accessible space for the Central Coast’s creative sector to flourish,” Mr MacDonald said.

“The funding for two separate footpath and cycleways on Bungary Road in Norah Head and along the Tuggerawong foreshore will support pedestrian safety and encourage greater cycling uptake by the local residents.”

In Thursday’s paper: Community gathers to express concern over Bath Street development

Mayor Jane Smith welcomed the investment in the arts, sporting and recreational opportunities.

“Our community’s vision is for a smart, green and liveable region with a shared sense of belonging and responsibility,” Cr Smith said.

“Working closely with the state government to deliver high-quality infrastructure and opportunities for our growing community is a way we are delivering on that promise.

“We are pleased the State Government have come to the table and delivered such significant funding for major projects that will help create a vibrant and sustainable Central Coast.

“Council has a limited budget, that is why securing funding opportunities is a priority for us and will continue to be.”

Deputy Premier and Minister for Regional NSW John Barilaro said the roll out of the second round of projects takes Stronger Country Communities funding to $300 million.

“I congratulate Central Coast Council and look forward to the local sports and community facility improvements that will make the region an even more attractive place to work and raise a family,” Mr Barilaro said.

Source: https://www.lakesmail.com.au/story/5641490/shared-pathway-and-cultural-hub-part-of-5m-spend/?cs=750

Usain

Wearing tracksuit pants with a long sleeve top and gloves, Usain Bolt appeared cooler than normal at his first training run with the Central Coast Mariners.

“The first day of training is always the roughest one,” admitted Bolt after his debut training session with the Mariners in Gosford.

The eight-time Olympic gold medallist and 11-time world champion is the personification of speed and power.

But he will now be assessed on technique, dribbling skills, passing accuracy, endurance and coordination.

“For me I am just trying to get over the first hurdle and that is to get a contract and to get fit,” confessed Bolt.

“I have to work on the basics skills.”

His first modified run lasted less than an hour — some run throughs, a few kicking drills and plenty of time watching on as his potential teammates went about a more intensive hit-out.

At times, the world’s fastest man looked slow on his feet and appeared out of place amongst the company of professional footballers.

“The glare was on him,” Mariners coach Mike Mulvey said.

“He wouldn’t be human if he didn’t have a bit of nerves.”

But it is worth remembering this was day one, where every intention was to ease Bolt into his highly publicised trial.

Is he the real deal? Does he have the skills? Is he really trialling for the A-League’s reigning wooden spooners on the day of his 32nd birthday?

“It’s something I want,” Bolt said.

The Jamaican will base himself on New South Wales’ Central Coast indefinitely, as he embarks on his newest sporting profession.

And the world, or at least the global media, is watching.

The standard turn-out for a Mariners training session is often counted on one hand.

Not this time: 100 journalists, camera operators and photographers applied to cover Bolt’s historic first session.

“We got offers from teams in Spain, France [but] it wasn’t the top division,” Bolt explained.

Bolt wants to play top-tier football and he has chosen the A-League.

It is a completely new playing field. From the mostly individual world of athletics, Bolt now must become a dependable, team player.

“His movement’s not of a professional player’s standard at the moment but, obviously, there’s plenty to work with,” observed Ray Gatt, The Australian’s chief football writer.

“I’m sure we’ll see improvement in him.”

Bolt determined to silence the doubters
While work needs to be done in walking the walk, Bolt is talking the talk.

When he landed in Australia last weekend ahead of his much-publicised trial, Bolt said all the right things: this is no gimmick; he’s here for the long haul; he wants to be an A-League soccer player.

Today was no different.

“I’m here, I don’t care what people say,” he said.

Whilst fitness is his current priority, the four-time Laureus World Sportsman of the Year is confident he has what it takes to become a professional footballer.

“My ability to understand very quickly and to learn the game is something that I am very good at,” Bolt said.

And time is on his side. The Mariners have said they would not be rushed into a decision on Bolt’s playing future.

“If it takes 12 months … I am happy for him to be here,” Mulvey said.

“This guy is a winner.”

The club hopes his winning athletics pedigree — and his “great mental capacity” — will leave a lasting impression on the younger players, regardless of whether he secures a playing contract.

“He’s one of the lads; he doesn’t get any special treatment,” Mulvey said.

“That’s not the way a team works.”

Del Piero, Yorke, Fowler, Heskey, Kewell and Cahill have all played their part in the A-League as a marquee player and now Bolt wants to strike his name as the competition’s next main man.

“I think I see the game very well,” Bolt said.

But, for now, even one of the world’s greatest athletes is just an everyday hopeful.

And perhaps for the first time in his career, Bolt knows what it is like be on a level playing field, something his athletics rivals rarely got to experience.

 

Source: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-08-21/usain-bolt-determined-to-make-mark-with-mariners/10149138

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Central Coast Library Service is offering a number of free study workshops for Central Coast high school students undertaking the HSC in 2018.

The workshops aim to create a ‘stress free HSC’ to help calm nerves, and maximise potential and results during this critical time. The free events are open to senior students from years 10 through to 12, and will be led by a series of experts to equip students with the tools they need to succeed. Council Acting Unit Manager Libraries, Ms Beth Burgess, said these events are a fantastic opportunity for students to get hints and tips from professionals without the cost.

“We understand that the senior years of school are an important and often stressful time for many students and we are pleased to offer this special series of events for our community.” Ms Burgess said. “The initiative is part of the Library’s investment to assist with meeting educational needs across the Coast and we encourage all year 10, 11 and 12 students to take advantage of these excellent learning opportunities.”

Events will be held in the Tuggerah, Toukley and Erina libraries as follows: May 19, Activated HSC workshop, The Tempest; May 24, Understanding PIPs and Society and Culture; June 2, A Parent’s Guide to the HSC: Supporting your child through Years 11 and 12; June 7, Decoding HSC English; June 23, Acing the HSC Trials, effective exam preparation workshop; September 1, What you need to do to score top marks.

 

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2018/05/free-hsc-workshops-central-coast/

to do list

Let’s face it — life can get really crazy sometimes, especially when we’re trying to balance work, family, a social life, and whatever other real-world obligations come our way on a daily basis. For that reason it’s vital to understand ways to make a better to-do list, in order to keep us organized, understand what things absolutely need to be completed, and to actually be able to finish them in a timely manner.
It seems like an easy enough thing to do, right? Sit down with a pen and a piece of paper and jot down the things we need to get done that day. However, there is really an art to creating the best of the best to-do lists — ones that will truly help us to meet deadlines and ultimately feel less stressed and more accomplished.

I know plenty of people who tell me they never make to-lists because they feel they’re a waste of time. These are the same people I encounter in my life who forget to follow up on emails, or send things when they say they will, or even return phone calls or texts. Their head is always in the clouds, so to say. They live in the moment — which is fine for certain types of work and living situations — but definitely is a challenging way of life for those of us with more regimented jobs and family responsibilities. For those who live for structure, I’ve got you covered in this article. Following some of these tips could be a game-changer for you, as I know they have been for me.

Here are seven ways to make a better to-do list.

1. Consider Quality Vs. Quantity

I am notorious for making extremely long to-do lists. For one, I love the feeling of being able to cross something off the list, so even the little things bring me joy. Secondly, I have a million balls spinning at once all day so without these lengthy lists sometimes I honestly will forget to drop off clothes at the dry cleaner if I don’t write it down.

According to Forbes, a good way to prevent us from bogging down our lists with meaningless items is to remember that by focusing on the big things (quality vs. quantity), we’ll be much more effective at our jobs, and in our broader lives as well. Forbes recommended keeping your list as short as possible, and really weighing a task before considering if you need to write it down. I’m not going to recommend you eliminate a task that you might genuinely forget to do. Rather, if you know every morning you start your day by responding to emails, no need to write that at the top of your list for tomorrow. Try your hardest to focus on the bigger things.

2. Make Your List The Night Before

It’s such a nice feeling waking up and already knowing what you need to accomplish that day, rather than spending the first hour flustered as you respond to emails and scribble a list. To achieve a level of uber-organization, try making your to-do list the night before. This will prevent you from having to waste your energy in the morning figuring out what things need to get done, according to Reader’s Digest. Also, making the list the night before can help calm your mind before you sleep so you’re not waking up in the middle of the night feeling anxiety over little things you might otherwise forget to do the next day.

3. Try To Start The List With The Hardest Task

Have to talk to your boss today about a failed project? Likely you’re completely dreading it, so get it over with at the start of the day. By tackling something difficult first thing you can create a sense of achievement that you’ll take with you for the rest of the day, according to foundr. Also, that hard thing will be done. It will feel so nice. It doesn’t always have to be uncomfortable conversations to start the day, just try to think of which task is going to be most difficult, and move it to the top of the list.

4. From There, Try A Sequential Approach

It’s only been in recent years that I’ve been such a crazy organization freak, but prior to that I used to create to-do lists by writing the day at the top of the page and then jotting down items as they came to my mind, rather than by when they needed to be completed. For a writer, this is a horrible approach because you’re constantly working against deadlines. You need a sequence!

Real Simple suggested a sequential approach to list making that organizes tasks by morning, afternoon, and evening. If you want to make it even more granular, the outlet suggested breaking down whether it will be completed at home, work, or wherever else. Keep our first tip in mind her, though, and try to keep your list of items short and sweet.

5. Include Time Estimates

I have come to live by this tactic mostly becomes it helps me see how many things I can realistically get accomplished in a day, and also because it keeps me motivated to finish assignments in a timely manner. Try adding a time estimate next to each item when you’re creating a list — whether you think it’s going to take you 15 minutes or three hours. Omar Kilani, cofounder of to-do list app Remember The Milk, told Fast Company doing this means “you can make realistic decisions about how much you can really fit into your day.”

6. Try Using An “Other” Section

This tip is a personal recommendation for those like me who despise ending a day without being able to cross every item off their list. I always keep a side list of “Other” items — things that don’t necessarily need to be completed that day, but that I don’t want to lose sight of completely. If I finish my must-do tasks early on a given day, I’ll move to the “Other” section and start ticking those off.

7. Limit The Amount Of Meetings In Your Day

This last one isn’t a tip for writing the list, but rather a way to help ensure you can achieve the items on it. Ever have one of those days where you’ve created an achievable to-do list, as the day goes on you’re pulled into meeting after meeting, then by 5:00 have not been able to complete one of your list items? It happens to us all from time to time.

Where possible, try to limit the amount of meetings in your day. TheMuse.com recommended before you schedule a meeting considering whether the issue could be resolved with an email, phone call, or a quick few minute conversation by the water cooler. If you absolutely need the meeting, try to keep it focused on the fewest number of key agenda items as possible, least number of participants, and the shortest amount of time possible, according to the outlet.

By taking the time in advance to make the right kind of to-do list, you can ultimately be much more productive, deadline-oriented, and overall effective in your work and home life. Take note of these tips, get yourself organized, and start getting things accomplished!

 

Source:  Erica Florentine | https://www.bustle.com/articles/142527-7-ways-to-make-a-better-to-do-list

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LAKE Haven Centre will match dollar-for-dollar the money raised by shoppers for an initiative to help alleviate youth unemployment and disengagement in the northern section of the Central Coast.

Lake Haven Centre and Beacon Foundation have launched the Light the Way initiative.

Beacon Foundation is a national not-for-profit organisation which motivates young people for a successful post-secondary school career.

It equips students with the skills and confidence required to make the transition from school to work and reduce the rate of youth unemployment.

Light the Way will involve a $1-per-ticket raffle for a Hisense 50-inch ultra high-definition ULED smart TV from JB Hi-Fi; and a money spinner in which shoppers (and children) will be invited to drop a coin in and pick up a balloon.

Both activities will be available at the customer service desk at the shopping centre.

Lake Haven Centre manager Mike Cochrane urged locals to support the initiative.

“Light the Way is an opportunity for our community to come together and support the work of Beacon Foundation,” Mr Cochrance said.

“We are proud to work with Beacon to engage young people in the northern Central Coast to achieve careers success and help alleviate issues of unemployment.

“Lake Haven and Vicinity Centres will match every dollar raised during our Light the Way campaign, which will ensure the Beacon programs continue to provide support for young people in our community.”

The raffle tickets and money spinner will be available from 9am on Friday, May 25, to 4pm, on Saturday, May 26.

 

Source: https://www.lakesmail.com.au/story/5376851/lake-haven-helps-tackle-youth-unemployment-video/

CC lifestyle

HOW do you rate your quality of life on the Central Coast?

According to a Central Coast Council survey, 91 per cent of residents rate their quality of life as “good to excellent”.

The council has released community survey findings, which will go towards development of its first ever Community Strategic Plan.

Council’s connected communities director Julie Vaughan said the surveys followed on from the initial engagement where council received more than 33,000 ideas and opinions about what would make the Coast a better place to live.

“The community was asked to rate their overall quality of life living on the Central Coast with 91 per cent of survey respondents saying they had ‘good’, ‘very good’ or ‘excellent’ quality of life, which is fantastic for the Coast,” she said.

Ms Vaughan said quality of life appeared to trend upwards with age and was impacted by location of residence, employment status, level of education and home ownership.

“Lifestyle and community, including attributes such as safety, sense of community and opportunities to participate in community life were the key drivers of quality of life,” she said.

Coasties identified transport and movement around the Coast as top issues to be addressed over the next 10 years.

During the survey, council approached over 1200 community members and key stakeholders through a phone survey, community workshops and meetings.

Mayor Jane Smith said the community strategic plan would be a “true representation of what our community think, feel, want and value”.

The draft Community Strategic Plan will be going on exhibition in April.

 

Source: https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/central-coast/central-coast-council-survey-rates-quality-of-life-on-the-coast/news-story/9cb54d51d1445ed63b587d933f4f3696

Investment-Prospectus-761x437

The Central Coast is the first region listed on the NSW Government’s new Regional Investment Prospectus, according to Member for Terrigal, Mr Adam Crouch.

Mr Crouch said he believed the recently-launched Regional NSW Investment Prospectus could attract national and international investment to the Central Coast. Launched by the Deputy Premier, Mr John Barilaro, the prospectus highlights the benefits and opportunities associated with domestic and international investment across regional NSW. Mr Crouch said the Investment Prospectus was an interactive online tool designed to attract national and international investment in regions across NSW, including the Central Coast. “The aim of this new Investment Prospectus is to highlight to investors the huge number of benefits associated with doing business and creating businesses in regional areas, including my electorate of Terrigal,” Mr Crouch said.

“Indeed, I am very pleased that the Central Coast is the first region listed on the new Investment Prospectus website,” he said. “With our region expected to grow by 75,000 people over the next 18 years, attracting investment is vital to ensuring that the Central Coast community has job opportunities on offer, and becomes an even more vibrant place to live.” Mr Barilaro launched the prospectus in the company of Consuls General and Trade Commissioners from 15 different countries. Mr Barilaro said he was thrilled to launch the website in front of a trade delegation of such size and stature as they toured regional NSW. “We want people from overseas to look at regional NSW and think, what a great place to start or grow a business, and that is what the Investment Prospectus is all about,” Mr Barilaro said. The Investment Prospectus will focus on supporting businesses that are expanding and developing new market opportunities, setting up greenfield operations, or planning to relocate to regional NSW.

 

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2018/03/investment-prospectus-features-central-coast/

CC Festival

The Lakes Festival is celebrating its fourth year in November, and Central Coast Council is looking for new and exciting event ideas to join the 2018 Festival Program.

The Lakes Festival is a 10-day event which celebrates the beautiful waterways across the Central Coast. In 2017, the Festival attracted over 60,000 patrons over the 10 days, with over 600,000 people reached via a strong marketing campaign including print, outdoors, social media and radio. “Do you have an innovative idea?” a Council spokesperson said. “Think outside the box and get involved. “Examples of ideas we are looking for include art based events, major events, sculpture events/ projects, digital media and installation events/ projects, or any other innovative event you can think of. “Events are assessed by the committee on their potential to involve the local community and visitors to the region,” a Council spokesperson said. Events must incorporate the lake, either via location or theme, and should be located around one of the below event hubs: McKenzie’s Reserve, Budgewoi, Canton Beach Foreshore, Long Jetty Foreshore, Picnic Point, The Entrance, Gosford Waterfront, Ettalong Beach and any other waterways on the Central Coast (pending approval).

“This year you will be able to apply for funding via Central Coast Council’s grants program to assist with getting your idea/event off the ground,” a Council spokesperson said. “The two types of grants you can apply for are a Community Partnership Grant or a Place Activation Grant. “The Community Partnership Grant aims to support existing local community events and projects, and you can apply for funding for between $5,000 and $20,000 (combined cash and in-kind). “It is specifically designed for activities and events that have grown and are of interest to a particular community or provide benefit to the Central Coast Community.

“Eligible applicants for this grant include a legally constituted not-for-profit organisation, a group auspiced by a not-for-profit organisation, and a business.” A Place Activation Grant is provided to support individuals, artists, community organisations, members and businesses to deliver activities in the areas of Place Making, Creative Industry and Social Enterprise. “You are able to apply for funding up to $5,000 under this grant, with the grant focusing on a new activity that enhances our local community, creates public artwork, or helps develop a social enterprise that is unique and creative”, the Council spokesperson said This is open to community groups, a business, artists or individuals. Applications close on Wednesday, Feb 28. Source: Media release, Feb 14 Central Coast Council Media.

 

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2018/02/new-ideas-sought-lakes-festival/

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CENTRAL Coast doctor Michael Kale challenges anyone to frown while holding fairy floss and wearing a colourful, loud shirt.

“It’s just impossible,” he said.

Mr Kale and fellow Central Coast Local Health District doctor Benji Pfister were promoting the healthcare community through Loud Shirt Fairy Floss Friday last week.

Now in its second year, the event aims to raise awareness around the mental health and wellbeing of healthcare workers.

Mr Kale said the event started as a staff health promotion at Wyong Hospital, and had exceeded their expectations. The initiative has now become a registered national charity.

“It was never meant to be this huge movement, but we are so excited about it,” he said.

“We have expanded it to Wyong and Gosford, and now plan to package the event nationally.”

Mr Kale said the original idea for the event was influenced by his uncle Bruce Kale who lost his life to mental illness.

“My uncle ran an amusement ride business, so that’s where the idea of fairy floss came in,” he said.

“The fairy floss brings back nostalgic memories of childhood and innocence. Fairy Floss Friday encourages all members that make up the healthcare community to stand in solidarity against issues facing those who spend their lives saving the lives of others.”

Dr Pfister said there were other campaigns focused on the mental health and wellbeing of doctors and nurses, but few extended to all levels in the healthcare community.

Central Coast Local Health District chief executive Dr Andrew Montague said Mr Kale and Pfister had done an amazing job.

“One in five people in the community will experience issues with mental health, but this is higher for health care professionals,” he said.

“Rates of suicide are also higher with health care professionals, particularly doctors.”
Mr Montague praised the initiative for including all healthcare staff, from nurses to cleaners and administration workers.

“Mental health doesn’t discriminate, and it’s so important to highlight that it’s an issue which can face us all,” he said.

Source: https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/central-coast/loud-shirt-fairy-floss-friday-celebrated-at-coast-hospitals/news-story/a5ae96567de1bb5a5ef220bc51e57a2f

bad habits
  • Nobody’s perfect – most of us have picked up a bad habit or two at some point.
  • Most of the time, a bad habit won’t wreck your whole life.
  • Still, it’s probably best to avoid these success-sabotaging tendencies.

Bad habits may not seem like a big deal on their own, but sometimes they can seriously drag you down in your life and career.

Of course, no one is perfect. In most cases, bad habits only result in relatively minor problems. So if you recognise one of these compulsions as your own, you probably have nothing to worry about.

However, in more extreme cases, certain tendencies can actually thwart you dreams of success.

Here are the top nine habits of unsuccessful people:

1. You’re always tardy

Sure, things happen, but consistent tardiness is typically unacceptable in a professional setting. Showing up late makes you look careless and unreliable.

As Laura Schocker wrote for the Huffington Post, one San Francisco State University study linked ” chronic lateness and certain personality characteristics, including anxiety, low self-control and a tendency toward thrill-seeking.”

2. You hold grudges

You don’t need to walk around singing kumbaya. It’s fine and normal to dislike and distrust certain people in your life.

But holding intense grudges is just a waste of your valuable time and energy. In an article for Web MD, Mike Fillon cited one Hope College study that found that holding a grudge can even have negative health effects.

So learn to let things go.

3. You conform

Conforming was a survival tactic in middle school, but you’re an adult with a career now. Stop caring intently about what others think and falling in line just for the sake of getting along. Do what works for you.

If you devote all your time to blending in, you’ll never stand out.

4. You overspend

If money’s always burning a hole in your pocket, you’re setting yourself up for longterm financial woes. Saving money is crucial for your financial future.

Beat this habit by learning to identify psychological triggers for overspending.

5. You procrastinate

I’ll tell you all about the downsides of procrastination later.

Just kidding. Seriously, though, indecisiveness could lose you time, money, and even the respect of those around you.

6. You lie

This one’s pretty simple. Be honest. It’s easy to fall into the trap of weaving small untruths that stretch into bigger and bigger lies. Break that habit.

Yeah, there are horror stories about cheats and liars who schemed their way to the top. But that doesn’t mean you should develop a dishonest streak yourself.

7. You burn bridges

Listen, in life and your career, it’s necessary to burn some bridges, if the person on the other side is toxic. However, those cases should be the exception, not the rule. As you move through different phases of your career, don’t alienate the people you come into contact with.

That could seriously come back to bite you if you cross paths with them later on.

8. You don’t take care of yourself

You could have all the success in the world, but it won’t mean much for long if you don’t maintain your health. Don’t allow stress to drive you to neglect exercise, eat poorly, and neglect yourself. Sooner or later, those choices will catch up to you and might just derail your life.

9. You have bad body language

Body language makes a big difference in how people perceive us – it’s often more important than what you verbally say.

That’s why bad body language habits – like poor eye contact and slumping posture – are so damaging. You could be sabotaging your opportunities before you even open your mouth.


Source: https://www.businessinsider.com/habits-of-unsuccessful-people-2018-1#ymbcO3ZCmgfXQsYY.99

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In their pursuit to keep the Central Coast feeling well, moving well and performing well, leading provider of Allied Health & Sports Medicine services, Coast Sport, has recently partnered with Wyong Lakes Australian Rules Football Club

The Magpies, or ‘Pies’ as they are affectionately known, are most excited to have a premium health care partner on board and look forward to a long- term partnership with the Tuggerah based Allied Health provider.

Located in the Mariners Centre of Excellence Building in Tuggerah, Coast Sport is the leader in provision of Physiotherapy, Podiatry, Exercise Physiology, Sports Nutrition, Clinical Pilates and Massage Therapy services to Central Coast communities. The team at Coast Sport work closely with many elite sporting teams and organisations including the Australian Dolphins Swim team, Central Coast Academy of Sport, Central Coast Mariners FC & Academy, Central Coast Heart Netball, Central Coast Crusaders, NSW Basketball and more.

The team at Coast Sport will be providing physiotherapy coverage at all home and away matches for the senior women’s and Black Diamond Cup Teams as well as providing pre-season screenings to senior players. Coast Sport recognises the importance of education for players, coaches and their families when it comes to things like injury prevention and management as well as nutrition and optimal training and recovery for performance. “We will be providing a number of educational sessions to ensure players are performing at their best and are fully supported to minimise injury occurrence” states Coast Sport Director, Brett Doring.

As part of their partnership commitment, Coast Sport will also be providing access for players to their state-of-the-art and highly equipped gym along with the latest technology and techniques that they utilise on all their elite athletes. Coast Sport Physiotherapist and Director, Mathew Cranney highlights the importance of “nurturing local talent and providing them with the best opportunity to shine in the future’, at Coast Sport we genuinely care about our athletes and work closely with them on their sporting journey, helping them to achieve their goals and dreams”.

Established in 1975, Wyong Lakes Australian Rules Football Club pride themselves on providing a fun family atmosphere for players of all ages. The club is currently working hard towards developing and growing its junior base, which now also includes two female squads. Senior numbers have also stabilised, and the club is looking to further grow numbers. Fostering a culture of inclusiveness and respect for each other, the ‘pies’ warmly welcomes new players. For more information about this great local sporting team visit the Wyong Lakes Australian Football Club website.

 

Source: https://www.centralcoastaustralia.com.au/news/coast-sport-selected-to-service-wyong-lakes-australian-rules-football-club/?current-news

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Worried what your boss thinks of you—if they like you, trust you, and think your contributions match up to their expectations?

If so, you’re not alone. Considering you’ll end up spending 10 years of your life at work, getting along with your boss is not only critical to succeeding in your career, but matters for your overall happiness and engagement at the office.

With that in mind, here are three easy ways to develop an effective, productive, and mutually rewarding relationship with your manager (even if they’re a tough cookie to crack):

1. Stop Using Email to Have Important Conversations
Is email your go-to forum for everything? In certain cases, it could be hurting your relationship. Even if it’s your manager’s favorite medium, it’s time to break the pattern of always relying on this.

Opt for in-person meetings if the conversation’s beyond a task or agenda-setting item—for example, if you’re asking for something or apologizing for a mistake. Not only is it just polite, it’ll most likely lead to a more productive discussion and help ensure you and your boss are truly on the same page.

“All of us are the worst possible version of ourselves in digital media,” adds Celeste Headlee, journalist and author of We Need to Talk: How to Have Conversations That Matter. “We might think we are persuasive in email, but scientifically, we are so much more persuasive in person.”

2. See Your Relationship With Your Boss as a Two-Way Street
Too often, we see ourselves as the executors and our managers as the creators of work, forgetting that our manager is also responsible for their own assignments.

So, if you want to immediately improve your relationship, ask them this simple question: “What can I do for you?” By opening up this conversation, you open the door for them to delegate projects they may not have otherwise considered. And, taking on stretch assignments can improve your visibility and lead to career advancement.

3. Be a Good Recipient of Feedback (and Ask Pointed Questions)
Get in the mindset that you want actual, honest feedback—and be physically ready for it.
Even if the feedback seems insensitive, kindly explain how the approach hurt your feelings, but then ask questions to get at the root of the problem, making it clear you really do want to improve. If you’re a good feedback recipient, your boss will be more likely to share valuable advice with you, which will ultimately help you grow.

And, if you’re finding that you only getting positive feedback, ask your manager to be more specific, or try mentioning something you wish you’d handled differently.

“If you open a dialogue with self-reflection, you give your boss—who might be uncomfortable giving you criticism—the opportunity to go on the learning journey with you,” advises Denise Cox, VP of Technical Services at Cisco Systems.

Finally, don’t wait for periodic reviews to get constructive feedback. If you can, ask your manager to schedule time to meet one-on-one weekly or monthly.

Research by Gallup shows that 50% of employees leave their job “to get away from their manager to improve their overall life at some point in their career,” which means building the right kind of relationship with your boss can make a real difference to your job satisfaction and career progression. Plus, it’ll make your friends and family find you much more enjoyable to be around outside of work.

 

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/tips-creating-productive-relationship-boss?ref=recently-published-0

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The prospect of returning to work after years away from my career was daunting. I faced a host of challenges: a lack of recent and relevant experience, outdated corporate skills, and uncertainty about my Baby Boomer place in a Millennial-focused world.

I still thought, however, based upon my early career success and an advanced degree in my field, that I’d get a great offer in no time. It didn’t happen. My strategy—jumping into a role that was the wrong fit (and later leaving), followed by picking up consulting gigs here and there and then trying to explain it all in a resume with gaps and changes—was failing. I needed a strategic shift.

So I changed everything, from how I was approaching the job search process to my end goal. As a result, I applied for and landed a returnship, with Goldman Sachs. (If you’ve never heard of it, a returnship is an internship for people returning to the workforce.) It enabled me to add current and substantive experience to my resume, and reset my career path so I could once again move forward.

Here are the six most important lessons I learned in my quest to get back on track.

1. Update Your Online Presence
Being a somewhat tech-savvy boomer, I had a LinkedIn profile.

But too many people have ones that are lackluster or outdated. If that’s you, place this at the top of your to-do list. Both recruiters and hiring managers use the site to find and screen candidates.

I left off dates for my degrees to minimize age bias, and truncated my experience to the past 10 to 15 years (I recommend you do the same!).

2. Network—Always
You may think that networking is just for young professionals who need to meet new people. That’s simply not true. It’s beneficial regardless of your age.

For example, I had a friend put in a good word for me, and I know that helped me to be considered for the role at Goldman.

Here are four things you should start doing (if you’re not already):

Periodically touch base with professional contacts. Be memorable by sending a personal note and an interesting article once a month.
Let the other person know that you respect their time by being specific when you have an “ask.” Say (or write): “I’d really appreciate your perspective—can we speak/meet for 15 minutes?” And then stick with that time commitment.
Extend your network. Ask your contacts to connect you with their contacts.
Follow-up with a thank you note, every time. Take it to the next level by offering to be of help if they ever need your perspective or expertise.

3. Make it Easy for People to Help You
If you’re asking someone to refer you, give them everything they need, so they can simply send along your details.

So, if you’re applying to a role at their company, this includes the job name, job number, your resume, and bullets outlining what skills and experience you’d bring that match the requirements for the role.

People are busy, and so if you give them a complete email they can simply forward, it’s a lot more likely it’ll get passed on.

4. Refine Your Elevator Pitch
When you’ve had a lot of experience, it’s important (though often hard) to be clear about your objectives.

What are your areas of expertise?

What type of role are you looking for?

It’ll be tempting to rattle off everything you’ve done in the past, or say, “I can really do anything.” But a long speech can be overwhelming for listeners—and can make you look overqualified—and unfocused. So, cut it down and zero in on one thing you want the other person to come away with. My rule of thumb is that it should be no longer than 30 seconds.

5. Practice Self-Care
Unreturned emails, closed doors, and rejection all sting. But, it happens to pretty much everyone, especially when you’re outside the “sweet spot” of hiring prospects.

There’ll be surprises for better and worse: People that you’d have bet would be right there to help aren’t; and people you barely knew will do all they can.

So, it’s all the more important to be kind to yourself: go the gym, meet friends, and see a movie! That stuff may seem frivolous when you’re job searching, but it’ll help you feel happier—and keep you from letting your identity be wrapped up in your professional life.

6. Pay it Forward
Once you’ve landed in your new role, do what you can to help a colleague or friend of a friend. It could be at work, like offering to mentor junior employees.

Or, it could be that someone contacts you seeking your advice. Remember how you felt when you were job searching and do your best to find the time!

And of course, when you’re hiring in the future, give those who’ve had winding career paths a second look.

After my 10-week returnship program ended, I was asked to stay on for another year—and I did, happily. When my role recently came to an end, leaving Goldman Sachs was bittersweet.

But one thing that made me feel better is that I knew I was ready to find my next, more permanent position. On this search, I have not only a solid and recent accomplishment to leverage, but all of the lessons I’ve learned the last time around, as well as some new and treasured Millennial friends.

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/the-6-best-job-search-lessons-i-learned-after-10-years-away-best-of?ref=the-muse-editors-picks-1

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Whether you consider this fact disheartening or motivating, you can’t deny its truth: You probably spend more time with your co-workers than you do with anyone else.

When you’re in the office at least 40 hours per week, the people you work with become a big part of your life. So it pays to have solid relationships with them.

Not only does that give you a strategic advantage in the workplace (hey, it never hurts to be well-liked!), it also makes work that much more enjoyable.

If you don’t consider yourself particularly close with your colleagues, don’t worry—cultivating a more caring and supportive atmosphere at work doesn’t need to be a complicated undertaking.

Here are four super simple things you can do to show your co-workers that you care and, as a result, make your office a place that you look forward to spending time in.

1. Offer Help

Think of the last time you were struggling at work. Maybe you were swamped and overwhelmed, or perhaps you were stuck on a challenging project.

Wouldn’t it have been nice if someone had stopped by your desk and provided some advice? Or even offered to take something off your plate? Wouldn’t that alone have made you feel so much more valued and supported?

Absolutely. So, why not do that same thing for a colleague? When you see someone who’s stressed or confused, just ask: Is there anything I can do to help?

Even if your co-worker doesn’t actually take you up on your offer, just the fact that you recognized the challenge and wanted to do something about it goes a long way in fostering a more empathetic culture.

2. Get Personal

No, you don’t need to get too personal—after all, you’re still in the office.

But, even though you’re in a work setting, aim to forge a relationship with the whole person—not just a job title.

This means that the more you can get to know about your colleagues’ interests and passions outside the office, the easier it will be to connect with them on a more human level.

Whether it’s asking about his marathon training or admiring her desktop background featuring a photo from her recent vacation, don’t neglect to strike up the occasional small talk. Doing so will demonstrate your investment in them, while also giving you common ground that you can use to connect even further.

3. Provide Recognition

Everybody loves to get a pat on the back for a job well done—that’s universal. But gratitude and adequate recognition can easily fall by the wayside when we’re wrapped up in the chaos of our everyday lives.

Step up and be that colleague who always applauds the hard work of your team members. Maybe that involves sending a quick Slack message to let her know how much you enjoyed her presentation. Or, perhaps it means highlighting your co-worker’s contributions when your boss commends you for your own hard work on a recent project.

These sorts of comments might seem small, but they can make a huge impact when it comes to helping others in your office feel valued.

4. Do Something Nice

Little acts of kindness won’t go unnoticed—particularly in the office. So, when’s the last time you did something nice just because you felt like it?

Go ahead and pick up some bagels on your way into work one morning (when in doubt, free food is always effective). When you’re heading out for lunch, ask that colleague who looks insanely busy if you can get anything for him.

Your co-workers are sure to appreciate those little niceties and treats that you sneak in every now and then. Plus, as an added bonus, doing these sorts of things makes you feel good too!

These four strategies are great for showing your co-workers that you actually care about them. And they’re incredibly simple and take almost zero effort on your part.

So, if you’re eager to forge better, more supportive relationships with your colleagues (and if you aren’t, you definitely should be!), put these four tips to work. You’re sure to become one of the most-liked people in your office—while simultaneously cultivating a more positive atmosphere for your entire team.

 

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/4-easy-things-you-can-do-to-show-your-coworkers-you-care?ref=recently-published-1

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You’ve likely heard the advice to add numbers to your resume bullets. It helps recruiters really picture the impact you’ve made in your position, and it frankly just sounds more impressive.

See for yourself: Which person would you hire?

Person 1: Duties included taking field measurements and maintaining records, setting up and tracking project using Microsoft Project, and developing computerized material take-off sheets.

Person 2: Initiated and managed tracking systems used for the Green District water decontamination project, saving $125,000 on the overall project through a 30% decrease of staff allocation time.

Exactly.

Of course, I know what you might be thinking: Sounds great, but what if I just don’t really work with hard numbers? Maybe you’re in a role that requires softer skills, or maybe you don’t have hard data or sales reports to pull from.

That’s OK! Truthfully, no matter what you do, you can add some numbers and data to your resume to give it that extra touch.

Here are three ways to quantify your experience without being in an inherently quant-y field:

1. Range

Not knowing the exact figure for things is often a big deterrent for using numbers in resumes. But one way to overcome this is to use a range.

It’s perfectly fine to not know exactly how many clients you see a month or how many calls you take a week, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t still quantify it.

Give it your best estimate, and the range will show that there is a bit of leeway. And, of course, focus on your impact.

2. Frequency

Now that you know it’s fine to use a range, one of the easiest ways to add some numbers is to include how frequently you do a particular task (after all, that’s a number that applies to pretty much everyone).

This is particularly helpful in illustrating your work in high-volume situations—a hiring manager will be able to see just how much you can handle.

3. Scale

You’ve heard it before and you’ll hear it again: Employers across the board care about money—and saving it. Including the frequency of your actions give a great sense of scale, but an even more eye-catching way to do this is to talk about the bottom line.

Think about all the things you do that ultimately save your company money, whether it’s streamlining a procedure, saving time, or negotiating discounts with vendors. Multiply those actions by how frequently you do them, and pop them into your resume bullets (remembering, again, that rough numbers are OK).

Numbers make such a huge difference in resumes—no matter what your work involves.

So, the next time you’re polishing your resume, try adding a few numbers to quantify your work and see how they really drive home the impact you’re capable of making.

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/how-to-quantify-your-resume-bullets-when-you-dont-work-with-numbers?ref=carousel-slide-1

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You’ve waited months for this moment—the chance to prove your worth to your boss and get a leg up in your career.

Let me break it to you: You won’t get what you want if you don’t prepare properly. In fact, your review will only go well if you get organized and collect all your information before the talk.

So, with that in mind, here’s what you need to do the night of your next performance review to put yourself in a great position for a productive conversation that’ll get you ahead in your career and get you on your boss’ good side:

1. Learn How to Respond to Feedback

You know not to yell (right?). But do you know there are ways to respond to negative feedback that actually make you look good?

You’re going to want to pay attention to the following because it’s possible you’ll receive some not-so-great feedback. And even if you’ve been doing fabulous work, it’s almost guaranteed you’re going to receive some form of constructive criticism (no one’s perfect, after all).

First, as Muse Career Coach Emily Liou points out in an article about handling negative feedback, own up to your mistakes and be ready to offer a solution or show initiative to do better.

And, says Muse Writer Rich Moy, avoid blurting out things like “I didn’t realize that was wrong” or “It won’t happen again!”

2. Collect Your Accomplishments

Think you deserve a raise?

It’s so important to state your case by listing out your accomplishments (including how much money you’ve made for the company, the skills you’ve learned, the relationships you’ve built, and the projects you’ve completed) over the past six months or year.

3. Review Your Current Goals

Did you set goals at your last review? Or, do you have some personal ones of your own?

Either way, reviews are a great time to look back at what you were hoping to accomplish and see if you, well, actually did them.

If you met your goals, what did you learn along the way? Which ones are you most proud of? How can you build on them in the future?

And if you didn’t achieve them, how far did you get? Did your priorities change? What held you back? What can you do differently going forward?

Jot down some notes to discuss further with your manager when you meet. Which leads me to…

4. Set Some New Goals

Now that you know how far you’ve come, now you can decide where you want to go.

Do this by setting some realistic, yet ambitious goals. Consider the following:

What skills would you like to master by your next review?
What responsibilities do you want to take on?
What projects are you passionate about pursuing?
What weaknesses would you like to improve upon?
What goals would you like to continue to build on?
What role do you want to shoot for one to three years from now? What can you do now to put yourself in the running?

5. Prepare Any Lingering Questions

Especially if one-on-one time is rare in your office, reviews are super helpful for getting some of your most burning questions answered. It could be about the status of your team or department, or the goals of the company, or possibilities for career growth (like budget to get some professional development help).

6. Prepare for a Tough Conversation

Maybe your boss will bring up some serious concerns. Maybe you even seen a performance improvement plan coming. Or, maybe it’ll be a normal review on your manager’s end, but you’re going to have to raise your hand to discuss bigger issues.

For example, now’s a good time to talk about the fact that you’re bored in your role or you’d like to consider an internal transfer.

Having these conversations is hard! But being prepared makes it a little easier.

7. Pat Yourself on the Back

Finally, give yourself some credit for making it to this big milestone. Sure, it happens every year, and you may not even receive anything special except for a simple “Great work” from your manager, but you’ve made it through what was probably a busy, exhausting, or even tumultuous period—look back on it, pat yourself on the back for everything awesome you did, and know you’re going to kick even more butt after this review.

Now all you have to do is double-check your review time (in case you have a jam-packed day), lay out a slightly-nicer-than-usual outfit (it doesn’t hurt), and get some beauty sleep.

And no matter what happens, because you’ve prepared, you’re sure to handle it like a champ.
Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/7-things-to-do-the-night-before-a-review-if-you-want-it-to-go-well?ref=carousel-slide-1

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Can you get me a job at your company, please?

Do you know the CEO—and can I talk to her?

Want to see my resume? It’s awesome, I swear.

These are the things we’d like to say to people when we’re networking, but for obvious reasons can’t.

So, the question always becomes, what can we ask?

I recently read Molly Beck’s book Reach Out: The Simple Strategy You Need to Expand Your Network and Increase Your Influence. And in it, she breaks down the art of networking into bite-sized steps—one of which talks about good versus bad favours.

The concept is simple: Some things you choose to ask your network are better than others. And this means the difference between someone wanting to help you out and someone wanting nothing to do with your request.

If you read the quotes above and cringed at the thought of saying them to someone you knew, you already know what a bad favour is.

So, what makes a good favour?

“The key to a great favour is to ask a particular, definable question whose answer cannot be found on Google and can be answered easily in a paragraph or so via email,” says Beck in the book.

Let’s break that down a bit more:

 

It Should Be Specific

Your ask should be tailored to the person and not super open-ended. Beck gives the example “Can I pick your brain?” as both being way too vague and asking too much of someone (and for free, mind you). You’re better off saying something like, “What advice do you have for someone who wants to break into finance like yourself?”

 

It Should Be Non-Googleable

Don’t ask someone a question that you can look up yourself. Beck uses “What open jobs does your company have?” as an example that you could easily search on your own time.

 

It Should Be Short

Many of your requests will be sent over email to someone who’s already pretty busy, Beck points out, so they should be able to answer it without spending hours crafting a response.

 

Now of course, if the person seems excited to chat with you, you can ask to meet in person. But, Beck suggests, “If and when people say yes, keep in mind that you are working around their schedule, not yours, and you should be traveling to go to a place that’s easy for them to get to. Additionally, when you do meet for coffee or even a meal, you should be paying for them.”

Finally, the author says, every favour should come with a gift. Because this person is going out of their way for you, you should do the same—meaning you should include at least two beneficial things in your initial reach-out. Now, before you worry that you have to send a fruit basket and a bottle of wine every time you ask someone to grab coffee, don’t. It can be as simple as a compliment, a book recommendation, or an introduction to someone you think they would benefit from knowing.

(But if they end up helping you out in a big way, you might want to send them one of these thank you items.)

One of the most memorable favours I’ve ever gotten asked was when a reader of my blog emailed me to say that her friend was a big fan of my writing, and would I consider doing a birthday shout-out on the blog to her? It made my day that she and her friend thought so highly of my blog, and it was such a cool way to make someone feel special on their birthday. Of course I said yes. That super-unique favour opened up a great line of communication between all three of us.

Your request may be simpler (or, even more complicated) than this, but that doesn’t mean it’s not worth asking. If you follow the guidelines above, you’ll make it that much easier for someone to say yes—and be excited about it, too.
Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/a-networking-expert-on-how-to-ask-people-for-career-favors-and-get-a-yes?ref=carousel-slide-3

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You know those days when you leave work feeling amazing, pumped that you were highly productive? On the flipside, I’m sure you have days that are just the opposite. Ones that leave you feeling frustrated, wondering whether you got anything done. What if there was a way to end every day knowing that it was successful?

Unfortunately, there’s no bulletproof formula to guarantee this, but there are certain practices you can follow that’ll help.

Here are five habits that, if practiced daily, can boost your success at work:

1. Keep a Gratitude Journal

Gratitude journals have grown wildly popular and I can understand why. Earlier this year, I started a journal and committed to writing down one thing I’m grateful for every day. At 159 days in, I’m still going strong. I found that expressing gratitude every morning before work gets me in the right mindset and helps me prepare for the day’s challenges.

But don’t take my word for it. A study by UCLA found that people who regularly wrote down what they were grateful for were more optimistic and cheerful than those who didn’t. Interestingly, they also had fewer doctor visits and fewer work absences. Expressing gratitude daily is a simple, quick practice that has a massive impact, and there’s even an app for it in case you’re not a fan of physical journaling like I am.

2. Reduce Context Switching

Context switching is when you jump between various, unrelated tasks. You’re heads down on a project but get interrupted by an urgent message. A few minutes later, a conversation between co-workers distracts you, and, after you finally refocus, you remember an email you should have responded to earlier in the day. Does this sound like your day?

While rapid context switching may seem like the norm of the modern worker, Jessica Harris from Trello explains how it comes at a high cost:

We spend an average of just one minute and 15 seconds on a task before being interrupted.

It takes an average of 25 minutes to resume a task after being interrupted.

Heavily multitasking can temporarily lower your IQ by up to 15 points.

You probably can’t eliminate context switching altogether, but being mindful of the productivity damage it causes will allow you to create rules to avoid distraction (more on that in a second).

3. Create “If/When-Then” Plans

I learned about this habit from Robert Cialdini’s book, Pre-Suasion: A Revolutionary Way to Influence and Persuade. Here’s how it works. You pick a cue, then pick a desirable action that you can link to that cue. Here are a few “if/when-then” rules I follow:

If/when I need to work without interruption, then I leave my desk and find a drop-by room.
If/when it’s time to eat lunch, then I order a salad. Boring, I know.
If/when I get a calendar invite for Thursday (when my company has a no-meeting policy), then I move the meeting to a different day.
Research suggests that people who use “if/when-then” planning are between two and three times more likely to achieve their goals. This type of planning is effective because you’re proactively creating automatic responses. When situations arise that might prevent you from reaching your long-term goals, you’ve already decided how you’ll act.

4. Exercise—Even if Only for a Few Minutes

You know you should exercise—the benefits are significant. But knowing isn’t the tough part—it’s finding time in your busy schedule to make it happen.

Running, cycling, or going to the gym may be ideal, but all you really need is a few minutes. One option is the 7-Minute Workout. It’s an intense workout you can do almost anywhere and is proven to deliver results.

Taking a short break to go on a walk is a great way to reduce stress. A few years back I committed to going on one walk in the middle of the workday.

These quick strolls elevated my heart rate, for just a few minutes, and it enabled me to go back to my work with renewed focus. So, even if you don’t have time to hit the gym, exercising for only a few minutes each day is still worth it.

5. Have a Shutdown Ritual

Eric Barker, a best-selling author who wrote an entire book on success, teaches the importance of having a “shutdown ritual” in which you take the time to close out the day’s business and prepare for tomorrow. His research found that the simple act of writing down the things you need to take care of the next day can settle your brain and help you relax.

My shutdown ritual includes making a concise list (no more than three) of the most important things I need to do the next day. Since committing to this practice I’ve found that I think less about work when I’m out of the office. My ritual also includes cleaning my desk and shutting down my laptop, practices signaling that my work day has come to an end.

It turns out that implementing this has been found to relieve anxiety and help you enjoy your evening.

One final thought. While each of these five habits is intended to help you be more successful, it’s important to also pause and take a moment to define what success means to you.

These are guidelines, and, ultimately, you’ve got to create your own standard of excellence and measure progress accordingly. Because real, lasting success comes by aligning your actions with what’s most important to you.

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/5-habits-thatll-ensure-youll-end-every-day-feeling-successful?ref=carousel-slide-0

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Time is running out to plant ideas with Central Coast Council for the 2018 Harvest Festival Central Coast.

Council is encouraging as many local producers as possible to be part of the popular event following a fruitful first year festival earlier this year.

Council Group Leader, Ms Julie Vaughan, said the inaugural Festival saw more than 10,000 people visit 23 events and activities over two days in June.

“This was a great way to launch the Festival, and we want to see it grow again next year,” Ms Vaughan said.

“We would love to have more farm gate sales and tours added to the 2018 program.

“Feedback we received shows visitors want to have a look beyond the gate and see how our local farms work – how it’s grown, produced and harvested, from the farm to the plate.

“We understand some produce won’t be in season in June, and that’s ok. It’s about telling the story of your farm and the hard work involved – how long it takes to grow an avocado, why we have horse farms or information on living sustainably.

“We have some great farms in our mountains and valleys – citrus, pecans, beef, macadamia, avocadoes, native foods, horses and much more, so let’s work together to tell your story to the Coast and beyond.”

Events will be held across six hubs at Peats Ridge, Calga, Somersby, Mangrove Mountain, Kulnura and Yarramalong. The program is designed to encourage festival-goers to follow an event trail supporting visitation at multiple hubs.

The Festival highlights the hidden gems of the valleys and mountains while celebrating the fantastic local produce and the producers on the Central Coast, showcasing their diversity through a range of events and activities.

“There are also a number of other producers on the Coast who have farms outside of our festival site. We have plenty of opportunities for all producers to get involved and showcase your produce – whether its oysters, fruit or wine,” Ms Vaughan added.

“Get in quickly with your ideas. Talk to us today about how you can help grow the Harvest Festival.

“Come along to our information night which will be held on Monday 11 September, 6pm at Mangrove Mountain Memorial Club to find out more information on how you can be involved.”

Expressions of Interest (EOI) close on Friday 22 September to participate in the 2018 Festival – which could be as simple as farm gate sales, markets, dining experiences, music events, art installations or community events.

Source: https://www.centralcoast.nsw.gov.au/help-showcase-central-coasts-produce-producers-annual-harvest-festival/

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Acclimating to a new company can be both exhilarating and daunting. You want to jump into the role with enthusiasm, come across as a fast learner, and prove that hiring you was 110% worth it.

I know: I returned to work after 10 years away and put a lot of pressure on myself to adjust as quickly as possible. While my re-entry was through a fairly unique 10-week returnship program (a.k.a., an internship program for mid-career professionals who’ve taken a break), I was subject to the same uncertainty anyone would feel upon going back to the workforce after time away.

Fortunately, in addition to my background in front-line business roles, I’d had experience in leadership and professional development, so I realized that assessing the landscape and “fitting in” would be critical to my success.

With that in mind, here are my four best tips for adjusting:

1. Pay Attention to Company Culture

The role of culture can’t be overstated: Cultural norms can span the range of high-level company values to very specific action steps. They usually come in the form of unwritten rules.

For example:

Are senior leaders approachable, or is there a more formal channel that you need to be aware of?
Do colleagues eat lunch at their desks, or use that time to meet and network?
Do people leave at a reasonable hour or is facetime important?
Are they “always on” (through emails and logging in), even when they’re out of the office?
Culture’s the outcome of encouraged and accepted behaviors. And sometimes, there are aspects of culture that aren’t discovered until you make a mistake. For example, early on in a new role, I mentioned “business development” when referencing a topic. The senior leader in the room stopped the meeting to inform me that our firm never engages in selling, therefore the proper term was “client development.”

It didn’t count against me: Mistakes happen! But one way I was able to fit in and move beyond my faux pas was to make a note of it and use the preferred terminology moving forward.

2. Be Open to New Experiences

Regardless of your most recent role, changing companies means you’re entering a new situation. And this new group will inevitably do things differently.

Rather than fight to do things the way you’re used to, embrace the opportunity to adopt new approaches. For example, if your new team seems more focused on output than on strategy and analysis, learn more about the associated business impact before trying to change direction.

Or, if your boss is heavily focused on a thorough analysis of ROI before moving forward with a new program, make your best attempt to understand the drivers of that need.

Try it the new way at least once. That way you’ll give yourself a chance to determine which battles are worth fighting (and which aren’t).

3. Take the Time to Build Your Network

Your co-workers will be key to your success at your new company. Achieving results will require knowing whom to reach out to—at every level.

Figure out who has the insights, time, or interest to help you and introduce yourself. You’ll find that most people are happy to share their expertise if you ask. And take the time to see if you have skills, insights or contacts that would be of help to your new colleagues. It never hurts to build good will. The stronger your internal network, the easier time you’ll have when you need help.

Bonus: You can also build your overall network, by updating your online profile with your new role. It’s a natural reason for people to reach out and reconnect, which is always worthwhile.

4. Learn All You Can

The benefits of exposing yourself to multiple perspectives and new experiences are vast. If you remain open-minded and park your ego at the door, you’re bound to benefit from an amazing amount of learning.

Seriously, by just carrying around a notebook your first few days, jotting down questions, and seeking out answers, you’ll pick up so much more knowledge than you had before. It doesn’t matter if you think you’re supposed to know this—the fact is that you don’t and the more quickly you learn, the more at ease you’ll feel.

Above all, it’s important to remember that you’re entering a group of established professionals and they’ll respect you for taking the time to understand how everything works.

While you may feel an urge to share your past (and possibly lofty) experiences with your new team to establish yourself, resist the temptation to brag. Rather, use time with your colleagues to understand what they do and what they see as priorities. There will be plenty of time to add your perspective once you’ve gotten a more complete picture and have the data you need.

Before long, you’ll stop feeling like “the new person” and start feeling like someone who’s been there forever—in the best way possible.

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/4-tips-thatll-make-easing-back-into-office-life-a-little-easier?ref=carousel-slide-1

Bouddi

The Central Coast has shared in the success of the Sydney College Cup, with visiting American media adding time to their travel itineraries to capture the beauty of the region, and share it with fellow US travellers.
TV documentary series, ‘In Season’, NFL blog, ‘The Blonde Side’, and online travel and entertainment magazine, ‘CultureMap’, visited Sydney to cover the NFL game, but set aside additional time to experience the famous lifestyle of the Central Coast.
‘In Season’ is a travel TV show that features destinations through the eyes of sports enthusiasts.
‘In Season’ filmed horse riding and quad biking, pelican feeding, and bush walking in the Bouddi National Park.
It will air in the US in mid-2018.
Parliamentary Secretary for the Central Coast, Mr Scot MacDonald, said the coverage resulting from these media visits will encourage American millennials to travel to the region.
“I am delighted that the beautiful Central Coast will be featured in the American media,” Mr MacDonald said.
“The broadcast and online stories will showcase our stunning beaches, national parks, and great food and wine scene, to encourage overnight visitation and boost the local economy,” he said.
“Leveraging major events and showcasing regional NSW helps the NSW Government towards its goal of doubling overnight visitor expenditure by 2020.”

Source: http://coastcommunitynews.com.au/2017/09/central-coast-delights-to-be-presented-to-usa-audiences/

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The Central Coast Council’s biodiversity certification proposal for land south of Sparks Rd, Warnervale, within part of the Wyong Employment Zone, may be ready for exhibition in late 2017.

Council lodged the application for biodiversity certification with the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage at the end of 2016. Wyong Regional Chronicle asked Council for an update on the status of the proposal. In a written statement, Council said that it was “in the process of preparing additional documentation to enable the plan to be publicly exhibited later this year. “The biodiversity certification proposal identifies areas of highvalue vegetation and habitat for permanent conservation and protection,” the statement said. “In addition the proposal will streamline the development approval process and assist with planning for the expansion of development opportunities in the southern portion of the Wyong Employment Zone. “Once biodiversity certification is granted, development may proceed without the usual legislative requirements for site by site threatened species assessment, providing any requirements of the biodiversity certification are met.

“It will also assist with the planning for the expansion of development opportunities in a location where significant employment and infrastructure investment is expected to occur over the next decade,” the statement said. The Central Coast Greens said that they remained opposed to the entire biodiversity certification process across the State. “It is a blatant gift to the property development industry, so that the normal process of checking for threatened plants and animals can be avoided, and hectares of important habitat bulldozed for profit,” a written statement from The Greens, Central Coast said. When the NSW law relating to bio-banking changed in late 2016, Greens MP, Dr Mehreen Faruqi, said in Parliament: “We have totally incomplete legislation; we have no fi nal codes; we have no biodiversity offset methodology; we have no native vegetation map; we have no codes of practice for managing wildlife interactions; and we have no urban vegetation State environmental planning policy… “A paper by John Hunter, an ecologist and lecturer at the University of New England, found that the automated mapping system that uses pattern-recognition technology delivers just 17 per cent accuracy in identifying and determining individual plant communities in the Upper Hunter Valley,” Dr Faruqi said.

“Yet it is this automated mapping, and self-certification, that lies behind the biodiversity certification that the Council, under an Administrator, seeks,” Dr Faruqi said. “Biodiversity offsets are often not even established before the environment is ruined. “In fact, it could take hundreds of years before an offset replaces a destroyed ecosystem, if ever. “The evidence is there; it is just that biodiversity offsetting has become a very convenient and fl awed answer to a vexed question, and creates a false illusion that we can continue with business as usual and the environment will not suffer.” The Greens council candidates said that they did not support “this fl awed system which is all about making property development easier, and not about protecting the environment”.

Source: http://coastcommunitynews.com.au/2017/08/biodiversity-certification-proposal-may-ready/

1

If you want to be more productive in your life, you’ll have to change some of your current habits.

Self-awareness is key, so you first need to be aware of the things you do (or don’t do), the toxic impact that they may be having on your life, and where they could be holding you back from accomplishing your goals.

These four habits can absolutely damage productivity, but there’s a clear path on how to break all of them.

1. Texting Every Five Minutes

On average, we spend over four hours a day on our phones, which includes 85 texts that we send (for adults under 45).

Pretty crazy, right?

The reality is, every time you reply, you’re resetting your focus and hindering optimal productivity.

How to Break It

The first step to help text less is to turn off notifications to keep you from being distracted when new ones come in.

If you’re too tempted, commit for a specific duration of time (for example, one hour) to not look at your phone—you’ll get used to this over time.

2. Saying “Yes”

Saying “yes” certainly has its benefits, especially when presented with an opportunity that’ll show the depth of your capabilities. But this can be an unbelievably slippery slope.

Once you become stretched too thin, you’ll no longer be able to deliver quality work across various projects, and they’ll all begin to suffer. On top of that, while your intentions may have been in the right place, it may prevent future opportunities from coming across your plate.

How to Break It

When presented with a new project, stop and think for a minute before saying “yes.” Consider the short- to long-term impact, and start getting comfortable with saying “no.”

Trust me, your boss will appreciate the fact that you’re being honest, especially if various projects could be negatively impacted.

3. Getting By With Being Disorganized

Personally, this has been the bane of my professional existence. Sure, a messy workspace could mean you’re a genius, but if you’re organizationally struggling, it can be damaging to your productivity where you’ll be left playing a perpetual game of “catch up.”

How to Break It

First, you should declutter, physically and digitally. If you’re willing to part with the messy desk, it’ll be a cathartic exercise to actually have a fresh space to work at.

Next, think about how you’re prioritizing and what tools you’re using to monitor all the tasks you have. Over the years, I’ve become intimately familiar with the likes of project management tools like Basecamp, Trello, and Asana, but have also upgraded my notes and to-do lists with the likes of Evernote, Todoist, and Dropbox Paper.

Regardless of what you use, do some “grooming” and prioritize by those tasks with the highest weight.

4. Living Without a Schedule

It’s 9 AM Monday morning, and you’re digging yourself out of the abyss that is your email inbox.

But five minutes later, you get pulled into an urgent meeting that ends up lasting two hours while there was a time-sensitive email that you missed.

Ever happen?

Where there are definitely intangibles that you can’t get away from, taking an extra step to control what you can with a schedule you create will pay long-term dividends (especially for your sanity, too).

How to Break It

Spend 30 minutes on a work night (or Sunday) to plan out your day. Check your email, plan your to-do list, and know exactly where you’re going to allocate your time. Block out 30- to 60-minute time slots on your own calendar to ensure you stay on-schedule and on-task.

With the additional visibility, you can plan ahead fewer surprises, and if something unplanned does happen, you’ll know exactly where you need to pick things back up.

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/4-habits-you-need-to-ditch-if-you-plan-on-being-productive-today?ref=carousel-slide-1

somersby

THE Central Coast has long considered the Blue Mountains and Hunter as major tourism competitors but now the region is joining forces with neighbouring areas to boost international visitation.

A new tourism body stretching from the Blue Mountains to the Upper Hunter is on a mission to double visitation to the region by 2020.

Destination Network Sydney Surrounds North, one of six new regional tourism bodies, will have three staff based in the Gosford Smart Hub on Mann St as it looks to “package” the best of the Coast with other unique experiences in nearby areas.

“We’re keen to see more big events on the Central Coast, over and above the ones already on the calendar,” network chair David Fellows said.

“We’ll be close to all the local tourism stakeholders by being based at Gosford, and we see the staging of more big events as one of the key ways to growing tourism here.

“We also believe we can package up four or five-day experiences for international tourists arriving in Sydney, where they can spend some time in this region soaking up the great beaches and other unique parts along with, say, diving with dolphins at Port Stephens and a day at the wineries in the Hunter.”

Central Coast Parliamentary Secretary Scot MacDonald said the State Government was still considering whether to allow the expansion of Warnervale airport and pave the way for direct international flights.

The government left the airport off its latest regional plan for the Coast and has been considering for more than a year whether to repeal the Warnervale Airport (Restrictions) Act 1996. Despite this, Central Coast Council is already pushing ahead with major general-aviation plans.

Mr MacDonald said the Coast’s $844 million tourism industry would “greatly benefit” from the new network’s presence in the region.

“With Sydney Surrounds North stretching from the Blue Mountains to the Upper Hunter, more activity across our regions means more jobs and boosted local economies,” he said.

Former Coffs Coast tourism boss Glenn Caldwell has been appointed as the local network’s general manager.

 “Glenn comes to this important role with more than 15 years’ experience in tourism and major events management, having worked in both corporate and government environments,” Mr Fellows said.

The next major event in Gosford will be on October 14 when king of pop Lionel Richie says hello to Central Coast Stadium.

Source: http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/central-coast/destination-network-sydney-surrounds-north-sets-up-base-in-gosford/news-story/ecca586d528850544918820213fe8550

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You’re ready to make a career move—maybe you’re looking for a new job, launching a side business, or eyeing a promotion. In all of these instances, boosting your personal brand can help you achieve your goal.

That’s because a strong personal brand is a carefully designed message that’s compelling and attracts the right people. It helps you stand out for who you are and what you do best.

You’re probably nodding along, because you already know all of this. You don’t need to be convinced how valuable personal branding is: What’s holding you back is the time commitment.

That’s why you have a LinkedIn Profile, even though you haven’t updated it since you set it up. After all, who can devote hours each week on top of working or job searching? Well, believe it or not, 30 minutes is all you need to take your efforts to the next level. Here’s how to spend them:

Minutes 1-10: Evaluate What Makes You Stand Out

The first thing you want to do is perform a self-assessment. This step is often overlooked, but it’ll be super helpful as you find your voice in a sea of professionals with similar experience.

This evaluation helps you have a clear vision of your USP, or “unique selling proposition,” which is just a fancy term for the value you offer to your target audience.

Here are some questions to get you started:

  1. What are you passionate about? You want to think about what excites you, and what things you truly enjoy doing.
  2. What are your core beliefs? This is important because it’s like a mission statement. It’ll help you relay your personal approach to getting things done.
  3. What are your top four strengths? This’ll help you share what you do better than anyone else, to set you apart from the competition.
  4. Are you a good leader or a good doer—or both? This is good to know because it’s a way to identify and highlight the kind of roles that complement your strengths.
  5. What do others say about you? Ask around! You may have strengths you’re unaware of, or talents you need to put more emphasis on so people know they exist.

To be clear, I don’t expect you to answer these questions with witty taglines. This exercise is to help you target your branding efforts. So, answer the question(s) that inspire you by jotting down notes, and honestly writing what comes to mind.

Minutes 10-20: Compare That to What You Already Have

Now that you’ve done some reflection on what you want to say, it’s time to see how it stacks up against what’s already out there.

If someone were to read your LinkedIn profile, tweets, or personal website, would they see messaging that points them toward the answers you came up with?

You might be thinking: Wait, I only have 10 minutes, that’s not enough time to read my whole website or review my LinkedIn line by line. But, here’s the thing, people who click into one of your social profiles or visit your website are probably going to spend a fraction of that time looking at it.

So, you want to look for things that shout what you do. On LinkedIn, that means moving beyond filling out the basics and adding links to media, writing posts, and getting endorsements for skills. On your website, that might mean building a portfolio. On Twitter, it’s about not just following influencers, but composing tweets, too.

This step is about comparing what you want to highlight to what you have and asking yourself: What’s missing? What can I add?

Minutes 20-30: Create a Schedule

Truth talk: Personal branding isn’t a “set it and forget it” kind of thing. Once you’ve figured out what you want your message to be and how you can share it more effectively, you’re going to need to start posting—consistently.

A helpful way to be consistent is to set a schedule that you can use as a guide. It shouldn’t feel like a chore, but if you’re anything like me, if you don’t schedule it, it could get back-burnered. All I ask is that you give it 10 minutes a day!

Here’s an example of a schedule you can start with:

  • Monday: Make (or update) a list of people you’d like to engage with more (a former manager) or simply connect with (an industry influencer).
  • Tuesday: Reach out to someone from that list. If it’s someone you’re reconnecting with, try one of these ideas. If it’s a stranger, you can test out this Twitter trick, or, if you’re brave, just send a cold LinkedIn invite using these templates.
  • Wednesday: Spend time looking for industry-related articles in publications popular in your field and share one. Or, alternatively, comment on someone else’s post (or at a minimum, share it).
  • Thursday: Make (or update) your list of improvements you’d like to make to your online presence. Break it down into baby steps. For example, you wouldn’t write, “Build personal site.” You’d write, “Look into site designers” and “write copy for personal site bio.”
  • Friday: Spend today looking yesterday’s list and knocking just one thing off.

Of course, you can tailor your plan to whatever works best for you. Honestly, if you just do the five things above even once a month, you’ll see traction. Regardless of the schedule you choose, feel free to switch it up, and see what gets the best response. You won’t see results overnight, but, that’s OK.

My final piece of advice is to avoid being misled by the term “personal branding.” What I mean is: The most successful brands aren’t just about you. Take the time to know your target audience, and listening to what’s on their minds as well. Genuinely connect and build relationships! As best-selling author Dale Carnegie said, “To be interesting, be interested.”

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/how-to-create-a-personal-branding-plan-in-30-minutes-even-if-you-hate-personal-branding?ref=carousel-slide-1

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Knowing exactly what you’re doing at work is a great feeling. You’re confident, full of ideas, and ready to tackle anything.

Except—lately, you’ve noticed your co-workers seem to be avoiding you. They’re not extending invitations for group projects and you’re pretty sure you caught them rolling their eyes when you speak.

What gives?

The harsh answer is, to quote an old cliché: “nobody likes a know-it-all.” The more nuanced one is that they want to feel good at their jobs, too, and if you swoop in with the right answer all the time, they don’t have that chance.

So, it’s not enough to have the best ideas—you need to pay attention to how you deliver them, too.

On the bright side, a few simple shifts can help you salvage your reputation, and once you do, you’ll have the complete package of good ideas plus thoughtfulness.

Here are three changes you can start making today:

1. Be Patient

When you share your ideas first—especially if they’re strong—you eclipse your teammates’ ability to contribute. Yes, they can still build on what you’ve said or add something different, but your behavior sends a signal that you don’t really care what they have to say. After all, if everyone agreed to go with your plan, there’d be no reason (read: opportunity) to hear anyone else out.

Conversely, when you let others speak first, you’re giving them a chance. It shows that you think they have ideas worth listening to as well.

This strategy does run the risk that someone else will have the same brilliant thought as you, and he or she’ll get credit for it. But, that’s a good thing! If you agree, you can amplify it by saying, “I like Tina’s suggestion,” which’ll go a long way toward repairing the impression that you only value your opinions.

2. Be Open to Questions

One time you have to speak first is when you’re the one leading a discussion. But, as we all know, there are two ways to go about presenting an idea and asking for feedback.

The first is to share your idea and follow up with: “Can’t we all agree this is the best strategy?” Sure, this is a question—but the only answer you’re going for is a one-word “yes.”

The second option is to encourage your teammates to revise your work, by saying, “I’d love your thoughts on this: Do you see any areas for improvement?” Unlike a know-it-all who only looks for people to agree and execute their vision, you’re going out of your way to make a space for others to make valuable contributions. (If you want to dig into this a bit more, I lay out the right and wrong way to ask for feedback here.)

3. Be a Team Player

Truth talk: There’s usually more to being seen as a know-it-all than an excess of good ideas. It often comes with a side of arrogance.

It’s good to be ambitious and push yourself to contribute as meaningfully as possible, but it shouldn’t be at the expense of making your teammates feel like a bunch of runners-up.

So, ask yourself: Do you acknowledge when someone else has a good idea? Do you concede when you’re wrong, and back down when it doesn’t make a difference?

Where you’ve previously searched for holes in people’s ideas, challenge yourself to look for—and comment on—their strengths.

As someone who struggles to avoid coming off this way, I know the insecurities that come along with reining it in. You worry about downplaying all you know, and losing out on opportunities because of it. Or you don’t want to step back from a leadership role in a discussion—even once. Or you’d feel overlooked if someone else gets credit for an idea you were thinking and had forced yourself to hold in.

Here’s the thing: I’m not telling you to silence yourself or hide your genius. If you have an idea and you want to speak up and first, go for it. If you feel strongly about taking a project a certain direction, say so. Just realize you don’t have to operate at that speed all the time. If you pick your moments, you won’t just give others a chance—you’ll find they’ll be more supportive of you, too.

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/how-to-share-your-brilliant-ideas-at-work-without-coming-off-like-a-knowitall?ref=carousel-slide-0

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IT’s a beer lover’s paradise and it’s getting bigger every year.

The sixth annual Central Coast Craft Beer and Cider Festival will take over the Kincumber Hotel this Sunday­. Last year’s event attracted more than 1800 people and this year, weather permitting, that number should be broken.

The Central Coast’s own Six Strings Brewery and Block ‘n Tackle as well as dozens of brewers from all over Australia will be showcasing more than 100 craft beers and ciders with everyone from beer enthusiasts, cider connoisseurs, craft novices and home brewers invited to discover their new favourite brew.

Kincumber Hotel events manager Claudia Grati said the event was “awesome”.

“I think it has resonated with the public because of the varieties available at one place at one time,” she said. “There are a lot of differences among them.

“Microbreweries are stepping out from what beer traditionally is and has been and people love the variety and individuality that comes from that.

“People love to be surprised and we bring as many brewers as we can from all around the country so locals can find a new flavour that they love.”

Ms Grati said the festival also offered a winery style tasting experience.

“People can get up close and personal with the brewers and ask questions like why they made it a certain way or what inspired them to add unique flavours together. The intimacy of the festival is one of its best features.”

She said in terms of flavour combinations two from previous years had stood out for her.

“Yenda do a vanilla and chocolate stout beer — it was like a dessert, it was beautiful,” Ms Grati said.

 “Last year’s winner was also very unique blending a malt-based stout with smoked oysters which was called Black Pearl. It was unreal.”

The festival will run from 11am to 5pm. There will be live entertainment, street food stalls, loads of exhibitors, merchandise, competitions, the James Squire brew marquee and the Yenda Kombi van brew-bus.

Source: http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/central-coast/biggest-central-coast-craft-beer-and-cider-festival-yet-at-kincumber-hotel/news-story/ec221472d6ad8657c8d528bd1e792279

 

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To understand what it means to be driven by your passion, one need only speak with Sarah Osman, a successful account executive by day and an ambitious entrepreneur and creative by night (and on weekends!). Basically, whenever Osman isn’t making things happen at her day job, she’s devoting time and energy to her side gigs.

Yes, that’s plural gigs: Osman is the founder of Made Simple by Sarah, a lifestyle and nutrition program, and, more recently, she and Jenna Sands, a friend she reconnected with, co-founded Wellness Meet Up NYC—more on that later.

Osman’s sales background has come in handy lining up sponsors for the events, suggesting the powerful impact transferable skills can have on your side gig.

The following is an edited excerpt from our conversation:

You’re Currently Wearing a Lot of Career Hats. You Work in Sales, but You’re Also a Nutritionist? How Does This All Work?

Yes, I’m an account executive at a media company, and three years ago I went back to school and I got my degree in nutrition, so I’m also a health coach—on the side—and for a while I was seeing clients and posting and sharing recipes. I’m still doing that, but I’ve tapered my nutrition clients to focus on the Wellness Meet Up events.

Tell Me About That: How Did You Conceive of the Meet Ups? And What Are They Exactly

I became connected with an old friend, Jenna, who was working for a granola company, and we got to talking about how there was this weird world of social media, where people know what someone ate for breakfast or what their favorite workouts are, but they’ve never actually met in person.

We sought to bring the community together: connect the influencers and the community members outside of the social media world and into real life. To do so, we started in-person events, based on a different wellness theme and influencer.

How Do the Wellness Meetups Work?

We started Wellness Meet Up NYC back in October 2016. Since then, we’ve been doing monthly meetups with a different curated theme and host. We’re doing multiple events per month now and are branching out into different cities. It’s a nice extension of what I was doing on my own from a nutrition space [with Made Simple by Sarah], and a way to reach more people with the limited time I have. Because this is very much a side hustle.

If Money Were No Object, Would You Be Pursuing This Full-Time?

Before this job, I would’ve said yes. I was in another sales role I didn’t like, selling a product I didn’t like. It would’ve been no question. But now, I love what I’m selling. It’s such a cool time for me to be in the industry. Besides food and nutrition, I love media, and it’s a great fit.

For me, it’s not about money, I just need more hours in the day. It’s not if money were no object; it’s if time were no object.

It Sounds Like You’ve Had Some Not-So-Great Work Experiences? What’s the Worst Job You Ever Had?

An intern in fashion. I’d sit there and glue stuff that had fallen off of clothes. I’d wait on Fridays for a delivery guy who often never showed up! Thankfully, it was just a summer stint.

What Advice Do You Have for People Who Want to Pursue a Side Gig?

Give it your all. Give it 100%, and you’ll know if it’s something you truly and really love. If you have absolutely no free time, and you’re making sacrifices, and it still feels worth pursuing, you’ll know it’s what you’re meant to be doing.

I’ve accepted the fact that I have no free time, and that’s what my passion is worth to me.

What’s Next?

Well, our next Wellness Meet Up—a females and fitness event—is on June 21st in New York City. More info here if you want to learn more.
Osman’s path is one way of understanding how a side gig functions. Deciding whether to return to school, however, is a big decision and not one to make lightly. In fact, you can often gain experience in a new field without seeking another degree. In this article, career expert Scott Anthony Barlow explains how to do just that.

And if you’re simply unsure of a side hustle’s potential, this article, “Here’s How I Made $10K on Side Gigs (and How You Can Too)” may be just the thing you need to read.

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/this-is-how-i-manage-a-demanding-side-hustle-on-top-of-a-fulltime-job?ref=carousel-slide-4

CC stadium

GOSFORD  faces a “litmus test” as host of the world’s biggest music stars when pop icon Lionel Richie says hello to Central Coast Stadium later this year.

In a major-event coup for the region, Richie — who has sold 100 million albums worldwide since leaving The Commodores in the early 1980s — will be dancing on the ceiling at Gosford stadium on Saturday, October 14, for his only regional show on his seven-concert All The Hits national tour.

Concert promoter Paul Dainty, who counts rock gods Rolling Stones, Bon Jovi, Iron Maiden and Guns N’ Roses among his clients, said if Coasties partied all night long in big numbers with Richie, “this could be a start of a number of top-class international acts coming to Gosford”.

“This could be the springboard to something very big for the Central Coast,” Mr Dainty said from London this week.

“We just don’t want to be Sydney-centric with our big concerts.

“We’re kicking off with Lionel, and if we get a good turnout at Gosford, then we’ll know the people there would like us to bring more big-name international acts.

“This concert will be breaking new ground for the region.”

Multiple Grammy-award winner Richie said he was pumped about bringing his biggest hits including Hello, Easy, Truly and Dancing on the Ceiling to the Coast.

“I am beyond excited to be coming to the beautiful Central Coast Stadium along the Gosford waterfront this October,” he told the Express Advocate.

“The concert really will be something special.”

Mr Dainty said Gosford could become a regional mecca for the world’s best entertainers “if locals come out to support this show”.

“We’ve been looking at where we could expand our markets in Australia,” he said. “I had looked at (Central Coast Stadium) some years ago, but we’re keen to trial it now.

“The venue is potentially great for concerts in a wonderful setting by the waterfront.

“We’ve got our production team working on where the stage will go, but our expert team will make sure it’s in the right position for the right experience.”

‘BIGGEST MUSIC ACT TO EVER HIT COAST’

CENTRAL Coast Council is confident Lionel Richie’s concert will help transform Gosford stadium into a hub of sport, music and entertainment.

Council director Mike Dowling described the Richie concert as “a real coup” for the region.

Mr Dowling said the council was working hard to attract a wide range of events to Central Coast Stadium which has a 20,000-seat capacity­.

“This is the type of event we’ve been looking for, allowing us to showcase the amazing and versatile venue we have right in our own backyard,” he said.

“This event forms part of Central Coast Council’s long-term strategy for the stadium following lengthy negotiations with world-class promoters, NRL clubs and other event organisers to bring to the community a range of events for the whole family.

“Lionel is arguably the biggest music act to perform on the Central Coast and only the start of things to come.

“The Coast will see more NRL games than ever before, more concerts and community events as well as our ongoing and valued long-term relationship with the Central Coast Mariners.”

In a worrying trend, events at the stadium dried up after Gosford Council took over its management from John Singleton in 2014.

Major stadium drawcards including the Crusty Demons (2008, 2010) and concerts featuring some of Australia’s biggest acts — Killing Heidi, The Whitlams, Grinspoon and country acts Adam Brand, Gina Jeffreys and Lee Kernaghan (2000) — have not been seen again at Gosford.The council will shortly unveil its program of events for the stadium for the next 12 months.

Source: http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/central-coast/pop-icon-lionel-richie-to-play-concert-at-central-coast-stadium/news-story/f8cccfe85f436fd249eeb9c0beb6067b