1

CENTRAL Coast doctor Michael Kale challenges anyone to frown while holding fairy floss and wearing a colourful, loud shirt.

“It’s just impossible,” he said.

Mr Kale and fellow Central Coast Local Health District doctor Benji Pfister were promoting the healthcare community through Loud Shirt Fairy Floss Friday last week.

Now in its second year, the event aims to raise awareness around the mental health and wellbeing of healthcare workers.

Mr Kale said the event started as a staff health promotion at Wyong Hospital, and had exceeded their expectations. The initiative has now become a registered national charity.

“It was never meant to be this huge movement, but we are so excited about it,” he said.

“We have expanded it to Wyong and Gosford, and now plan to package the event nationally.”

Mr Kale said the original idea for the event was influenced by his uncle Bruce Kale who lost his life to mental illness.

“My uncle ran an amusement ride business, so that’s where the idea of fairy floss came in,” he said.

“The fairy floss brings back nostalgic memories of childhood and innocence. Fairy Floss Friday encourages all members that make up the healthcare community to stand in solidarity against issues facing those who spend their lives saving the lives of others.”

Dr Pfister said there were other campaigns focused on the mental health and wellbeing of doctors and nurses, but few extended to all levels in the healthcare community.

Central Coast Local Health District chief executive Dr Andrew Montague said Mr Kale and Pfister had done an amazing job.

“One in five people in the community will experience issues with mental health, but this is higher for health care professionals,” he said.

“Rates of suicide are also higher with health care professionals, particularly doctors.”
Mr Montague praised the initiative for including all healthcare staff, from nurses to cleaners and administration workers.

“Mental health doesn’t discriminate, and it’s so important to highlight that it’s an issue which can face us all,” he said.

Source: https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/central-coast/loud-shirt-fairy-floss-friday-celebrated-at-coast-hospitals/news-story/a5ae96567de1bb5a5ef220bc51e57a2f

1

Let’s be clear: It’s innovate or die out there.

Ideas are the currency that buys you a starring role in today’s workplace. But too many people prioritize ownership over adoption, and watch their ideas waste away as a result. Truth is, you’ll be more effective if you work collaboratively with a team to turn ideas into action.

Here’s why you should ditch the old ideation silo and give your best thoughts to the group.

Team Buy-In Makes Things Happen
Ideas are often the prelude to change, and change generally rubs people the wrong way. So, how to get around the very human—but avoidable—friction that comes from shaking things up? Go out of your way to gain your team’s buy-in on the things that may affect them.

Especially if you’re a manager, inclusive decision-making may not only get you a better outcome by melding more minds during the ideation and decision-making processes, it ensures that the team understands the motives and considerations behind new ways of working. Ultimately that means less pushback, a deeper awareness about what led to decisions in the first place, and a more evenly distributed stake in the outcome.

Whether or not you’re a manager, this is a good way to conquer any resistance to change.

Tap Into a More Diverse Range of Opinions
A team brainstorm may be no better than a private one if everyone in the group thinks the same way. You need to mix it up.

Study after study has shown that diverse groups—gender, sexuality, race and ethnicity, age, etc.—produce better ideas and make better decisions. Cloverpop, a company that tracks companies’ decisions to help them manage the decision-making process, found in a two-year study that gender-mixed teams comprising a wide range of ages and geographic representations made better decisions than homogeneous teams 87 percent of the time.

Makes sense. People with different backgrounds have different outlooks, motivations and experiences that shape their contributions at work. Hearing their voices and ideas produces a more well-rounded exchange of thoughts vetted by a wider variety of perspectives.

You may have to do some work to get a good mix of people in the room, but it’s worth it. While you’re at it, don’t discount less obvious diversity factors, like years of experience and time at your company.

See How Ideas Hold Up Against Messy Human Stuff
We’re all human, and regardless of race or gender or any of the other factors above, we’re simply wired differently.

For example, think about Myers-Briggs psychological types. People have different ways of perceiving and interpreting information, different thought patterns and emotional reflexes. The idealists on your team will have different ideas than the cynics. The process-oriented people will see things differently from the gut-driven types.

Working through ideas with a mix of personalities will help you find middle ground and flesh out a plan of action that works for everyone.

Test Your Assumptions
Idea sharing can be a valuable vetting exercise if everyone’s encouraged to speak candidly. Ask people to poke holes in your logic, to prove why your proposal won’t work, and to name every single thing that could possibly go wrong. The harder to tear down, the better the idea. Use the feedback to reformulate your idea until you’ve patched the flaws.

If you’re a team lead, this is even more critical. Sometimes you have to design new ways of working but you’re not the best person to do so because you’re not the closest to the facts on the ground—the people who work for you are. They can probably see the peril that lurks in a new idea right off the bat, and they’ll respect you more for recognizing that and hearing what they have to say.

Turn Ideas Into Action
In some ways, the idea is the easy part. The real challenge is executing.

If you think of ideas not as inventions that come out of thin air but as innovative solutions to complex problems, you and your team will have a better foundation for brainstorming.

And in the end, you’ll have a much easier time activating ideas if they’re vetted by a diverse group willing to provide constructive criticism, even if it means swallowing some pride and surrendering credit for the outcome.

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/why-your-next-big-idea-should-come-from-a-team?ref=recently-published-2

Weekly Jobs Update

Posted by | February 11, 2018 | Weekly Update

Video content gets up to 10 times more reach and engagement compared to links and images.

Boost your job vacancy with a video campaign to reach even more of our Central Coast local job seekers.

 

Click on ‘Submit a Job’ to list your vacancy.  Don’t forget to upload your logo for inclusion in the advert and video and we will create a video job ad campaign tailored to your vacancy.

Weekly local jobs update

Posted by | February 5, 2018 | Weekly Update

woy woy fun run

A month in to the new year, it’s important to keep your career resolutions on track!  Now may be the time to revisit the career goals you set yourself and ensure that checking JobsOnTheCoast.com.au for the latest local opportunities is one of them.  Keep an eye out for your next big step by clicking here.

CC plan

Big gains in housing and job opportunities have been highlighted in the first Central Coast Regional Plan 2036 Monitoring Report.

Released in mid-December by NSW minister for planning and housing, Anthony Roberts, the report documents the first year of the government’s 20-year blueprint for the Central Coast.

“In its first year the regional plan has enabled the approval of about 1,600 homes and the construction of more than 1,000 for the people of the Central Coast,” says Roberts.

“We’ve also identified more than 1,800-hectares of industrial land that could lead to $66-million in investment to generate new local jobs.”

First-year achievements include:

  • Issuing Gateway Determinations (decisions on planning proposals) with potential for 420 jobs and 800 dwellings
  • The Government Architect tasked to oversee the revitalisation of the Gosford CBD
  • The Gosford Hospital Health and Wellbeing Centre and the University of the Newcastle Central Coast Medical School and Research Institute received $350-million in funding

Source: http://www.architectureanddesign.com.au/news/nsw-government-releases-central-coast-regional-pla

bad habits
  • Nobody’s perfect – most of us have picked up a bad habit or two at some point.
  • Most of the time, a bad habit won’t wreck your whole life.
  • Still, it’s probably best to avoid these success-sabotaging tendencies.

Bad habits may not seem like a big deal on their own, but sometimes they can seriously drag you down in your life and career.

Of course, no one is perfect. In most cases, bad habits only result in relatively minor problems. So if you recognise one of these compulsions as your own, you probably have nothing to worry about.

However, in more extreme cases, certain tendencies can actually thwart you dreams of success.

Here are the top nine habits of unsuccessful people:

1. You’re always tardy

Sure, things happen, but consistent tardiness is typically unacceptable in a professional setting. Showing up late makes you look careless and unreliable.

As Laura Schocker wrote for the Huffington Post, one San Francisco State University study linked ” chronic lateness and certain personality characteristics, including anxiety, low self-control and a tendency toward thrill-seeking.”

2. You hold grudges

You don’t need to walk around singing kumbaya. It’s fine and normal to dislike and distrust certain people in your life.

But holding intense grudges is just a waste of your valuable time and energy. In an article for Web MD, Mike Fillon cited one Hope College study that found that holding a grudge can even have negative health effects.

So learn to let things go.

3. You conform

Conforming was a survival tactic in middle school, but you’re an adult with a career now. Stop caring intently about what others think and falling in line just for the sake of getting along. Do what works for you.

If you devote all your time to blending in, you’ll never stand out.

4. You overspend

If money’s always burning a hole in your pocket, you’re setting yourself up for longterm financial woes. Saving money is crucial for your financial future.

Beat this habit by learning to identify psychological triggers for overspending.

5. You procrastinate

I’ll tell you all about the downsides of procrastination later.

Just kidding. Seriously, though, indecisiveness could lose you time, money, and even the respect of those around you.

6. You lie

This one’s pretty simple. Be honest. It’s easy to fall into the trap of weaving small untruths that stretch into bigger and bigger lies. Break that habit.

Yeah, there are horror stories about cheats and liars who schemed their way to the top. But that doesn’t mean you should develop a dishonest streak yourself.

7. You burn bridges

Listen, in life and your career, it’s necessary to burn some bridges, if the person on the other side is toxic. However, those cases should be the exception, not the rule. As you move through different phases of your career, don’t alienate the people you come into contact with.

That could seriously come back to bite you if you cross paths with them later on.

8. You don’t take care of yourself

You could have all the success in the world, but it won’t mean much for long if you don’t maintain your health. Don’t allow stress to drive you to neglect exercise, eat poorly, and neglect yourself. Sooner or later, those choices will catch up to you and might just derail your life.

9. You have bad body language

Body language makes a big difference in how people perceive us – it’s often more important than what you verbally say.

That’s why bad body language habits – like poor eye contact and slumping posture – are so damaging. You could be sabotaging your opportunities before you even open your mouth.


Source: https://www.businessinsider.com/habits-of-unsuccessful-people-2018-1#ymbcO3ZCmgfXQsYY.99

Weekly Local Jobs Update

Posted by | January 29, 2018 | Weekly Update

woy-woy-bridge

Is Jobs On The Coast the bridge between you and your next job?  There’s one way to find out!  Click here to see the latest local jobs and your next career move.

1

Being stuck in a rut sucks. If there’s one thing I could wish for you, it’s that you never have to deal with a situation that holds you back from being happy, successful, or fulfilled.

That, unfortunately, is an unrealistic wish (even more unrealistic than wishing I could turn everything I touch into chocolate). Because like failure, ruts are inevitable. And the good news about that not-so-fun fact is that they ultimately help make us stronger, smarter, and more successful individuals.

Just look at a few people in your life who you admire—how many of them went through a struggle that forced them to reevaluate their goals or path?

Since I’m someone who doesn’t love surprises (except the birthday kind), I’m going to tell you right now exactly which ruts you’ll find yourself in throughout your career.

1. Being Bored
No matter how much you love your job, how many hours you work, or how large the pile of to-dos is on your desk, there will come a time when you will find yourself suddenly underwhelmed, unmotivated, or unstimulated at your job for days on end.

It could be for a number of reasons. Maybe your boss has stopped challenging you. Or, maybe you’re making the mistake of not seeking out challenges, or looking for exciting projects. Or, maybe you’ve found yourself in a new role that isn’t as exciting as you thought it would be.

Whatever the reason, boredom is usually pretty fixable. You can ask your boss for better projects, or see if you can chip in on what other teams are working on, or find ways to keep learning, like taking online classes or attending conferences related to your industry. If that still leaves you no better than you were before, it may be time to move on and find a role that’s more engaging.

2. Feeling Unhappy
Unhappiness is a more serious sign to keep an eye on.

Why is it so much more common than we realize? Because for one, we’re fickle beings—we’re always changing our minds and shifting our priorities. Which means the things we want in our careers now may change one, two, five years from now. That’s OK!

The other reason is because sometimes we’re really bad at recognizing when we’re miserable. We’ll place the blame on other things (woke up on the wrong side of the bed, had a bad commute, a crazy boss) rather than accept that something bigger is affecting us.Figure out what is making you unhappy and use that information to decide what your next steps will be.

Maybe it means transferring roles internally, changing companies, or switching industries entirely. Or maybe it’s even more simple than that. Maybe it’s talking to your boss about an overwhelming workload. Or asking your co-worker to stop talking to you when you’re working at your desk.

Whatever the cause, take the time to identify it and start making moves to solve it.

3. Doubting Your Career Path
Unless you’re very lucky, you won’t find yourself satisfied in the same role in the same industry throughout your entire career.

Don’t beat yourself up if you’re unsure about what you want to do next—even if you’ve spent 10 years in your role and are now doubting everything. The good news is that it’s never too late to make a change, whatever that means for you. The even better news is that you don’t have to have it all figured out when you’re 30, 40, 50.

As Benjamin Franklin said, “When you are finished changing, you’re finished.” Don’t be finished.

4. Feeling Like Nothing’s Going Right
Ever have those months when nothing’s going right? You keep messing up basic tasks, your manager keeps sending your work back with heavy revisions, your co-workers keep shutting down your ideas?

It could be your fault—if you’re job searching, for example, and getting nowhere, it might be worth reconsidering you’re approach.

But it could also be due to external forces, like a company restructuring or a bad boss. If so, it’s worth figuring out whether these can be fixed, and if not, what steps you can take to better set yourself up for success.

5. Having to Deal With a (Big) Change
Your company just went through a huge merger, half your department got laid off, you got laid off, they brought in a new boss, or oyou’ve moved to an entirely new city for a job.

One day, something major will happen that will shake up how you do things and think about your career. While it’s practically impossible to prepare for something like this, remember that it’s common. And, that it’s salvageable. And, that the feelings of loss and doubt and frustration and sadness won’t last forever. And, that you’ll come out stronger and more equipped to handle anything that comes your way. If you don’t believe me, read this.

The last thing I want to emphasize is that it’s easy to feel alone when you’re in these ruts, or that no one understands what you’re going through. But I can confidently tell you that everyone experiences these. Why else would I write this article?

So, don’t be afraid to admit when you’re in one—if you don’t, you’ll regret not making a change sooner. And if you still feel like the only one, chat with people just like you (and get some reassuring advice) on our Stuck in a Rut discussions platform.

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/career-ruts-everyone-will-get-into-some-point?ref=recently-published-1

1

In their pursuit to keep the Central Coast feeling well, moving well and performing well, leading provider of Allied Health & Sports Medicine services, Coast Sport, has recently partnered with Wyong Lakes Australian Rules Football Club

The Magpies, or ‘Pies’ as they are affectionately known, are most excited to have a premium health care partner on board and look forward to a long- term partnership with the Tuggerah based Allied Health provider.

Located in the Mariners Centre of Excellence Building in Tuggerah, Coast Sport is the leader in provision of Physiotherapy, Podiatry, Exercise Physiology, Sports Nutrition, Clinical Pilates and Massage Therapy services to Central Coast communities. The team at Coast Sport work closely with many elite sporting teams and organisations including the Australian Dolphins Swim team, Central Coast Academy of Sport, Central Coast Mariners FC & Academy, Central Coast Heart Netball, Central Coast Crusaders, NSW Basketball and more.

The team at Coast Sport will be providing physiotherapy coverage at all home and away matches for the senior women’s and Black Diamond Cup Teams as well as providing pre-season screenings to senior players. Coast Sport recognises the importance of education for players, coaches and their families when it comes to things like injury prevention and management as well as nutrition and optimal training and recovery for performance. “We will be providing a number of educational sessions to ensure players are performing at their best and are fully supported to minimise injury occurrence” states Coast Sport Director, Brett Doring.

As part of their partnership commitment, Coast Sport will also be providing access for players to their state-of-the-art and highly equipped gym along with the latest technology and techniques that they utilise on all their elite athletes. Coast Sport Physiotherapist and Director, Mathew Cranney highlights the importance of “nurturing local talent and providing them with the best opportunity to shine in the future’, at Coast Sport we genuinely care about our athletes and work closely with them on their sporting journey, helping them to achieve their goals and dreams”.

Established in 1975, Wyong Lakes Australian Rules Football Club pride themselves on providing a fun family atmosphere for players of all ages. The club is currently working hard towards developing and growing its junior base, which now also includes two female squads. Senior numbers have also stabilised, and the club is looking to further grow numbers. Fostering a culture of inclusiveness and respect for each other, the ‘pies’ warmly welcomes new players. For more information about this great local sporting team visit the Wyong Lakes Australian Football Club website.

 

Source: https://www.centralcoastaustralia.com.au/news/coast-sport-selected-to-service-wyong-lakes-australian-rules-football-club/?current-news

Weekly Jobs Update

Posted by | January 25, 2018 | Weekly Update

australia day umina

Happy Australia Day, Central Coast!  Here are the latest jobs available in this fantastic region – could this long weekend be your opportunity to connect to a great new role in 2018?  Click here to see what’s available.

gosford arts

The Member for Gosford and the Deputy Mayor have both greeted the New Year with a renewed resolve to fight for a regional performing arts centre on the Gosford waterfront.

Member for Gosford, Ms Leisl Tesch, said she would like to see the remaining former Gosford Public School land returned to the community.

It was sold to St Hilliers by Property NSW and is currently used for access and machinery storage related to the development of the State Finance building.

“I would love the remaining school land to be returned to the community or at least include a development dedicated to the community, but after the government sell-off of our community land, I am not confident that this is going to occur,” Ms Tesch said.

She said she was pleased that Central Coast Mayor, Jane Smith, had stated Council was discussing options with St Hilliers, the Central Coast Coordinator General, Ms Lee Shearer, and the Government Architect.

“Timing is critical, because the next NSW State Election is in March 2019, which is only a little over a year away, and depending on the outcome of the election, the pledged $10m for the regional performing arts centre could be lost,” she said.

“The next Federal election is also within the next two years, and could also be at any time, and that would be another $10m at risk.”

Ms Tesch said she hoped the New Year would also herald greater levels of transparency from the NSW Government-appointed coordinator general who has been charged with the revitalisation of the Gosford CBD.

“I have met the coordinator general and I have been told there would be more meetings down the track” she said.
“If the plan is to incorporate previous work and community consultation, including the segmentation of the CBD into precincts, then there needs to be more communication and a greater effort put into giving the community that information.”

Deputy Mayor, Chris Holstein, said progressing the promised delivery of a regional performing arts centre on the Gosford waterfront was also one of his priorities for 2018.

“The regional performing arts centre and what will happen on the Gosford waterfront is very much on my agenda, but there are a range of players down there,” Clr Holstein said.

“There are several things that will need to take place to ensure the project goes ahead,” he said.
“I am very supportive of the performing arts centre.

“There have been umpteen plans for the revitalisation of Gosford, some good and some bad, but there are components of all of that that will be beneficial, and that is what I hope that Coordinator General, Lee Shearer, will achieve,” he said.

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2018/01/regional-performing-arts-centre-to-be-a-priority-for-2018/

1

Worried what your boss thinks of you—if they like you, trust you, and think your contributions match up to their expectations?

If so, you’re not alone. Considering you’ll end up spending 10 years of your life at work, getting along with your boss is not only critical to succeeding in your career, but matters for your overall happiness and engagement at the office.

With that in mind, here are three easy ways to develop an effective, productive, and mutually rewarding relationship with your manager (even if they’re a tough cookie to crack):

1. Stop Using Email to Have Important Conversations
Is email your go-to forum for everything? In certain cases, it could be hurting your relationship. Even if it’s your manager’s favorite medium, it’s time to break the pattern of always relying on this.

Opt for in-person meetings if the conversation’s beyond a task or agenda-setting item—for example, if you’re asking for something or apologizing for a mistake. Not only is it just polite, it’ll most likely lead to a more productive discussion and help ensure you and your boss are truly on the same page.

“All of us are the worst possible version of ourselves in digital media,” adds Celeste Headlee, journalist and author of We Need to Talk: How to Have Conversations That Matter. “We might think we are persuasive in email, but scientifically, we are so much more persuasive in person.”

2. See Your Relationship With Your Boss as a Two-Way Street
Too often, we see ourselves as the executors and our managers as the creators of work, forgetting that our manager is also responsible for their own assignments.

So, if you want to immediately improve your relationship, ask them this simple question: “What can I do for you?” By opening up this conversation, you open the door for them to delegate projects they may not have otherwise considered. And, taking on stretch assignments can improve your visibility and lead to career advancement.

3. Be a Good Recipient of Feedback (and Ask Pointed Questions)
Get in the mindset that you want actual, honest feedback—and be physically ready for it.
Even if the feedback seems insensitive, kindly explain how the approach hurt your feelings, but then ask questions to get at the root of the problem, making it clear you really do want to improve. If you’re a good feedback recipient, your boss will be more likely to share valuable advice with you, which will ultimately help you grow.

And, if you’re finding that you only getting positive feedback, ask your manager to be more specific, or try mentioning something you wish you’d handled differently.

“If you open a dialogue with self-reflection, you give your boss—who might be uncomfortable giving you criticism—the opportunity to go on the learning journey with you,” advises Denise Cox, VP of Technical Services at Cisco Systems.

Finally, don’t wait for periodic reviews to get constructive feedback. If you can, ask your manager to schedule time to meet one-on-one weekly or monthly.

Research by Gallup shows that 50% of employees leave their job “to get away from their manager to improve their overall life at some point in their career,” which means building the right kind of relationship with your boss can make a real difference to your job satisfaction and career progression. Plus, it’ll make your friends and family find you much more enjoyable to be around outside of work.

 

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/tips-creating-productive-relationship-boss?ref=recently-published-0

Weekly Jobs Update

Posted by | January 15, 2018 | Weekly Update

central-coast-attractions-the-entrance

We have local Central Coast jobs added to our site every day.  Click here to see the latest opportunities!

1

Client engagement and call centre staff will be the two main groups of ATO employees to occupy the new Gosford waterfront tax office, according to Deputy Commissioner, Ms Sue Sinclair.

Ms Sinclair was in town for the Hello Gosford event.

“Basically it is called Hello Gosford, and we have run similar ones to these around various Australian states, and they have proved very popular,” she said.
“We invite the community, including tax agents, businesses and individuals to give them information about the taxation office, our services and an idea of how we can help them.
“It includes information for new small businesses, we offer a lot of support on digital services that we can showcase to make their lives easier,” she said.
Ms Sinclair said it was 2014 when the Federal Government announced it would build a new federal office in Gosford, with the ATO as lead agency.
She said the site was chosen due to proximity of transport and the opportunity to forge strong connections with the University of Newcastle.
“It fits the bill for us,” Ms Sinclair said of the new location.

She said 80 employees would be working out of the office before Christmas.
“In January, there will be a surge of people joining us,” she said of the New Year intake of 260 employees.
Another 115 will be due to start in May, after which another 150 jobs will be advertised.
“The majority of the people who started with us are actually the experienced people from the ATO, many of whom live locally, but some have been drawn from Parramatta and other localities in Sydney,” she said.

The ATO’s Gosford workforce would be a mixture of full time, part time, casual and non-ongoing employees.
“Even though next year we will be getting up to 600 people, there will be a continual churn, and opportunities for the local community with casual and part-time positions coming up all the time.
“It is a very modern office and we have a big reliance on being very well connected with technology.
“We’ve got a very sophisticated tele-presence site which enables us to do direct communication with all of our offices nationally via tele presence.
“We also have flexible working arrangements, so the office is geared up to enable different styles of work.
“We have areas suitable for working on projects, areas for collaboration and then some more traditional spaces.
“We will have a call centre operating here in Gosford.”

Ms Sinclair said she did not know the exact number of operators but they would be one of the biggest groups of employees based in Gosford, followed by the client engagement group.

Those two categories of employee would account for 45 per cent of the overall ATO workforce based in Gosford.
The ATO is sharing the building with the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) Group.

“We are taking the whole space except for the NDIS Group, which has a lower part of the building and a separate entrance to us,” Ms Sinclair said.
“We are negotiating with another state agency, but I am not sure where that will land.”
She said the intake of new employees to the building was being staggered because they were mostly brand new employees who needed induction and training.
Ms Sinclair said she was unable to state exactly what percentage of employees would be local, but said they would definitely be the majority.

“The sort of work they are doing is customer service, dispute resolution, so we have a presence of legal teams, advice work and corporate advice, basically a replica of a traditional ATO office.
“Call centre and client engagement are the group that look after engagement with clients from an advice and help and assist point of view, and they are a big part of our organisation.
“They look after things like superannuation, small business and individuals.”

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2017/12/call-centre-staff-will-be-the-largest-group-of-ato-employees/

1

The prospect of returning to work after years away from my career was daunting. I faced a host of challenges: a lack of recent and relevant experience, outdated corporate skills, and uncertainty about my Baby Boomer place in a Millennial-focused world.

I still thought, however, based upon my early career success and an advanced degree in my field, that I’d get a great offer in no time. It didn’t happen. My strategy—jumping into a role that was the wrong fit (and later leaving), followed by picking up consulting gigs here and there and then trying to explain it all in a resume with gaps and changes—was failing. I needed a strategic shift.

So I changed everything, from how I was approaching the job search process to my end goal. As a result, I applied for and landed a returnship, with Goldman Sachs. (If you’ve never heard of it, a returnship is an internship for people returning to the workforce.) It enabled me to add current and substantive experience to my resume, and reset my career path so I could once again move forward.

Here are the six most important lessons I learned in my quest to get back on track.

1. Update Your Online Presence
Being a somewhat tech-savvy boomer, I had a LinkedIn profile.

But too many people have ones that are lackluster or outdated. If that’s you, place this at the top of your to-do list. Both recruiters and hiring managers use the site to find and screen candidates.

I left off dates for my degrees to minimize age bias, and truncated my experience to the past 10 to 15 years (I recommend you do the same!).

2. Network—Always
You may think that networking is just for young professionals who need to meet new people. That’s simply not true. It’s beneficial regardless of your age.

For example, I had a friend put in a good word for me, and I know that helped me to be considered for the role at Goldman.

Here are four things you should start doing (if you’re not already):

Periodically touch base with professional contacts. Be memorable by sending a personal note and an interesting article once a month.
Let the other person know that you respect their time by being specific when you have an “ask.” Say (or write): “I’d really appreciate your perspective—can we speak/meet for 15 minutes?” And then stick with that time commitment.
Extend your network. Ask your contacts to connect you with their contacts.
Follow-up with a thank you note, every time. Take it to the next level by offering to be of help if they ever need your perspective or expertise.

3. Make it Easy for People to Help You
If you’re asking someone to refer you, give them everything they need, so they can simply send along your details.

So, if you’re applying to a role at their company, this includes the job name, job number, your resume, and bullets outlining what skills and experience you’d bring that match the requirements for the role.

People are busy, and so if you give them a complete email they can simply forward, it’s a lot more likely it’ll get passed on.

4. Refine Your Elevator Pitch
When you’ve had a lot of experience, it’s important (though often hard) to be clear about your objectives.

What are your areas of expertise?

What type of role are you looking for?

It’ll be tempting to rattle off everything you’ve done in the past, or say, “I can really do anything.” But a long speech can be overwhelming for listeners—and can make you look overqualified—and unfocused. So, cut it down and zero in on one thing you want the other person to come away with. My rule of thumb is that it should be no longer than 30 seconds.

5. Practice Self-Care
Unreturned emails, closed doors, and rejection all sting. But, it happens to pretty much everyone, especially when you’re outside the “sweet spot” of hiring prospects.

There’ll be surprises for better and worse: People that you’d have bet would be right there to help aren’t; and people you barely knew will do all they can.

So, it’s all the more important to be kind to yourself: go the gym, meet friends, and see a movie! That stuff may seem frivolous when you’re job searching, but it’ll help you feel happier—and keep you from letting your identity be wrapped up in your professional life.

6. Pay it Forward
Once you’ve landed in your new role, do what you can to help a colleague or friend of a friend. It could be at work, like offering to mentor junior employees.

Or, it could be that someone contacts you seeking your advice. Remember how you felt when you were job searching and do your best to find the time!

And of course, when you’re hiring in the future, give those who’ve had winding career paths a second look.

After my 10-week returnship program ended, I was asked to stay on for another year—and I did, happily. When my role recently came to an end, leaving Goldman Sachs was bittersweet.

But one thing that made me feel better is that I knew I was ready to find my next, more permanent position. On this search, I have not only a solid and recent accomplishment to leverage, but all of the lessons I’ve learned the last time around, as well as some new and treasured Millennial friends.

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/the-6-best-job-search-lessons-i-learned-after-10-years-away-best-of?ref=the-muse-editors-picks-1

Weekly Jobs Update

Posted by | January 9, 2018 | Weekly Update

Fireworks NYE greeting

Happy New Year!   If one of your resolutions is to find a job closer to home, this is the place to look!  Here’s to your success in 2018!

1

Lasercraft Australia is celebrating 30 years of operating a manufacturing business in West Gosford that employs disabled workers.

Lasercraft makes and sells corporate recognition awards, plaques and business gifts to major companies and government departments.
It also makes survey pegs for construction firms and surveyors.
It is a not-for-profit company and registered as a charity.
Revenue from its sales goes toward employment of supported workers with disabilities.

It currently employs 23 supported workers and provides training and workplace skills.
General Manager, Mr Peter Britton, said: “I love working with the supported workers.
“It is a delight to see them flower by gaining skills, having a normal work routine, increased socialisation and feeling accepted.

“Our aim is to create more places for supported workers, but this is only possible if we increase sales revenue.”
The supported workers are paid wages, and all have NDIS plans.

 

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2017/12/30-years-of-operating-a-manufacturing-business-that-employs-disabled-workers/

1

Whether you consider this fact disheartening or motivating, you can’t deny its truth: You probably spend more time with your co-workers than you do with anyone else.

When you’re in the office at least 40 hours per week, the people you work with become a big part of your life. So it pays to have solid relationships with them.

Not only does that give you a strategic advantage in the workplace (hey, it never hurts to be well-liked!), it also makes work that much more enjoyable.

If you don’t consider yourself particularly close with your colleagues, don’t worry—cultivating a more caring and supportive atmosphere at work doesn’t need to be a complicated undertaking.

Here are four super simple things you can do to show your co-workers that you care and, as a result, make your office a place that you look forward to spending time in.

1. Offer Help

Think of the last time you were struggling at work. Maybe you were swamped and overwhelmed, or perhaps you were stuck on a challenging project.

Wouldn’t it have been nice if someone had stopped by your desk and provided some advice? Or even offered to take something off your plate? Wouldn’t that alone have made you feel so much more valued and supported?

Absolutely. So, why not do that same thing for a colleague? When you see someone who’s stressed or confused, just ask: Is there anything I can do to help?

Even if your co-worker doesn’t actually take you up on your offer, just the fact that you recognized the challenge and wanted to do something about it goes a long way in fostering a more empathetic culture.

2. Get Personal

No, you don’t need to get too personal—after all, you’re still in the office.

But, even though you’re in a work setting, aim to forge a relationship with the whole person—not just a job title.

This means that the more you can get to know about your colleagues’ interests and passions outside the office, the easier it will be to connect with them on a more human level.

Whether it’s asking about his marathon training or admiring her desktop background featuring a photo from her recent vacation, don’t neglect to strike up the occasional small talk. Doing so will demonstrate your investment in them, while also giving you common ground that you can use to connect even further.

3. Provide Recognition

Everybody loves to get a pat on the back for a job well done—that’s universal. But gratitude and adequate recognition can easily fall by the wayside when we’re wrapped up in the chaos of our everyday lives.

Step up and be that colleague who always applauds the hard work of your team members. Maybe that involves sending a quick Slack message to let her know how much you enjoyed her presentation. Or, perhaps it means highlighting your co-worker’s contributions when your boss commends you for your own hard work on a recent project.

These sorts of comments might seem small, but they can make a huge impact when it comes to helping others in your office feel valued.

4. Do Something Nice

Little acts of kindness won’t go unnoticed—particularly in the office. So, when’s the last time you did something nice just because you felt like it?

Go ahead and pick up some bagels on your way into work one morning (when in doubt, free food is always effective). When you’re heading out for lunch, ask that colleague who looks insanely busy if you can get anything for him.

Your co-workers are sure to appreciate those little niceties and treats that you sneak in every now and then. Plus, as an added bonus, doing these sorts of things makes you feel good too!

These four strategies are great for showing your co-workers that you actually care about them. And they’re incredibly simple and take almost zero effort on your part.

So, if you’re eager to forge better, more supportive relationships with your colleagues (and if you aren’t, you definitely should be!), put these four tips to work. You’re sure to become one of the most-liked people in your office—while simultaneously cultivating a more positive atmosphere for your entire team.

 

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/4-easy-things-you-can-do-to-show-your-coworkers-you-care?ref=recently-published-1

Weekly Jobs Update

Posted by | December 18, 2017 | Weekly Update

Christmas starts

The team at Jobs On The Coast look forward to continuing to connect job seekers with local job opportunities in our beautiful region in 2018.

Take a look at our last update for 2017 here.

Wishing you a very Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

Weekly Jobs Update

Posted by | December 11, 2017 | Weekly Update

mt penang 3

Wouldn’t it be great to find a job in your own backyard, especially when our region has some pretty spectacular ones like this?  Click to here to find the latest opportunities on the Central Coast.

1

THE rail maintenance facility in Kangy Angy is forging ahead in a matter of weeks, despite ongoing protests from residents and Central Coast Council.

Central Coast Parliamentary Secretary Scot MacDonald announced today that work will begin in early 2018 on the controversial New Intercity Fleet Program Maintenance Facility to prepare for the arrival of the $2.3 billion New Intercity Fleet.

“We have awarded a key contract for the detailed design and construction of a new maintenance facility to service the trains at Kangy Angy,” Mr MacDonald said.

“Infrastructure and property group John Holland will now begin pre-construction activities with major construction expected to start early in 2018.”

Last week, Central Coast Mayor Jane Smith led the charge to call on Transport for NSW to move the facility from Kangy Angy to Warnervale. However, Deputy Mayor Chris Holstein said from all indications the facility was “in concrete”.

Mr MacDonald said the project is expected to generate 300 jobs on the Central Coast, including local apprenticeships during construction and 200 jobs ongoing once in operation.

Kangy Angy residents have been fighting the facility for more than two years, concerned about flooding, impact on wildlife and proximity to local properties.

Source: https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/central-coast/construction-to-start-on-kangy-angy-rail-facility-in-early-2018/news-story/3a228e35e3064e2ff950b92ec44070cc

interview1

Job interviews can be damn intimidating. You spend ages psyching yourself up to even apply for the thing and then you get the call offering you an interview, go you!

Full disclosure; the first time I had a job interview (it was for a Brumby’s bakery you guys) was also the first time I discovered my body is capable of producing sweat from many new places, including, (but not limited to); the front of my shins and tops of my hands. I get how much of a challenge this can be.

However, the thing that got me through that interview, and all the ones since, was prep.

Even if you haven’t prepped for the questions you actually get asked, you’ll still have visualised yourself answering something and had a go at getting your words out straight… which is a massive win!

So here are some questions you might be asked, and how you might want to go about tackling them.

Q: Tell us about your strengths and weaknesses?

Do: BE HONEST. I mean, as honest as is appropriate for a professional setting. Spend some time prior to the interview reflecting on what you might bring to the job and what your personal challenges might be.

If you’re having some trouble maybe ask a friend or family member to tell you what they think your strengths and challenges might be. Remember to try and keep it relevant to the job.

For example, if it’s a customer service type job talk about how you love people and are friendly and social. If it’s a tech or digital job, talk about how you’re passionate about problem solving and detail. It is likely that if you’re drawn to a job it suits your strengths in some way so bring them to the surface.

Don’t: Pretend you don’t have any weaknesses. It actually demonstrates that you have average self awareness more than anything. If you’re struggling to come up with weaknesses that aren’t super private maybe try and think of a strength and flip it.

For example, if your strength is that you’re great at coming up with big ideas, the flip side might be that sometimes you aren’t as task or detail focused. You can talk about this with self awareness and also talk about your own strategies for managing it  like ‘I sometimes struggle with details  so I have gotten into the habit of keeping really good to do lists and reviewing them before I begin my tasks each day’. Smoooooth.

Q: Tell us about how you work in a team?

Do: Think of a time you’ve worked in a team and use it as an example.

For example, ‘Last year when I was helping to organise our school art show I found that I played xxxx role for the group’.

Don’t: Give a wishy washy answer like ‘yeah, good’.

Think about the different roles you’ve played in groups throughout your life, even friend and family groups. Some roles might be; the clown, the leader, the peacekeeper, the logistics guru, the problem solver, the cheer squad. Have a think about what fits for you and come up with an example to illustrate it. It’ll be great!

Q: Tell us about a time you’ve overcome a challenge?

Do: Prep an example for this one, it is great if it’s one that highlights your strengths.

For example: ‘When I was working on a group assignment we found that everyone was getting confused with emails going back and forth and people were starting to get frustrated. So I asked the group if they would be willing to use a google doc or facebook group to get organised and everyone was on board. I set it up and left an initial post offering how we might want to use it and it worked really well’.

The above example highlights someone who is organised, perceptive and a leader, all good things.

Don’t: Say nothing. It might be tough to think of a challenge on the spot so don’t let it catch you off guard and make sure you prep for this question.

You can use whatever example you think will work, what you’re really trying to show the interviewer is that you can reflect and adapt when you need to.

 

Source: https://www.fya.org.au/2015/10/27/how-to-nail-the-job-interview/?gclid=Cj0KCQiAsK7RBRDzARIsAM2pTZ-eCQgzbYPi-pW5FrA9ndUZxUFFBPZcAG7ga7NYxBwHy4R_a3hPap0aAuRJEALw_wcB

Weekly Jobs Update

Posted by | December 4, 2017 | Weekly Update

crack-neck-lookout-01

Well, summer is here and it’s time to get out and enjoy our wonderful region.  Now you just need to nail that perfect job to make this summer unbeatable!  Click here to see the latest opportunities!

1

Construction has begun on the site of the new Tuggerah Lakes Private Hospital

Delegates from hospital operator Healthe Care Australia joined local MPs and business leaders yesterday to turn the first sod on the $23 million project.

The new hospital, located on the corner of the Pacific Highway and Craigie Avenue in Kanwal, directly opposite Wyong Public Hospital, will create up to 50 jobs and include 3 operating theatres, 14 recovery bays, 6 recovery chairs, 20 inpatient overnight beds and consulting spaces.

The first stage of the project will see up to 60 construction workers on-site each day.

Once completed, the facility will cater for Day Surgery and short stay patients for multiple specialties including orthopaedics, gastroenterology, ENT, plastics, urology, general surgery, and vascular among others.

The hospital will be supported with shared services from Gosford Private Hospital, as well as specialist consulting suites on its ground floor.

Matt Kelly, Central Coast Healthe Care Regional Manager Matt Kelly said he was excited the project was underway.

“It’s an extremely positive development for the region, and along with the many new developments at both Gosford Private and Brisbane Waters Private recently, will help to increase our capacity and the range of services we can offer right here on the Central Coast,” he said

The Hunter and Central Coast Joint Regional Planning Panel unanimously approved the hospital back in September.

Source: https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/central-coast/tuggerah-lakes-private-hospital-construction-work-starts/news-story/a87834a1ac77860a2a3e2180675830cf

1

Meetings are expensive. Not because you’re charging people to attend (obviously), but because they use people’s time; time that could be spent doing lots of other revenue-generating things. In fact, one study found that a recurring meeting of mid-level managers was costing one company $15 million a year!).

$15 million a year!

Not to mention, you also need to take into account the prep time as well as the context-switching time. Professor Gloria Mark at University of California, Irvine found that it takes an average of 25 minutes for a worker to return to their original task after an interruption.

Knowing these stats means that when I’m debating whether I need to call a meeting, I ask myself what it’s worth (literally). Is this the best use of everyone’s time, mine included? And not so infrequently, the answer is “nope.”

So, what to do then? Easy! Send a simple but critical email to keep everyone informed and on track.

What to Include

There are three key things you need to cover:

Logistics: why the meeting was cancelled and, if it’s a recurring meeting, what to expect for next time
Action: any critical action items completed or pending
Information: any updates or general FYIs for the group

Note: Don’t fall into the trap of putting the action items and logistics last. Having the most critical information higher up ensures that it’s seen when your colleagues skim their email. Oh, and a bonus tip for you: Put people’s names in bold if they need to do anything to make triple sure they notice.

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/turn-meeting-into-an-email-template

Weekly Jobs Update

Posted by | November 27, 2017 | Weekly Update

summer 1

Summer is just around corner, but before we start heading off to soak up the fun and sun, there’s still a few more weeks to get those applications in for your new role in the new year!  Click here to see the latest opportunities.

1

A company that started life in a Central Coast garage is on the brink of a major global expansion after signing an agreement to supply alpaca quilts to Chinese e-commerce giant JD.com.

Central Coast family-owned Bambi Enterprises manufactures a range of luxury natural fibre quilts at it’s West Gosford factory and is a leading supplier of bedding to major Australian retailers including Harvey Norman, Snooze and 40 Winks.

Last week Bambi hosted a delegation from JD.com at its factory — another step in the relationship with the Fortune Global 500 listed internet retailer which is expected to buy at least $1.5 million worth of locally made quilts annually.

Bambi Managing Director and founder Peter Witney said supplying a retailer like JD.com heralded a major expansion for Bambi including a bigger factory, more employees and possibly 24-hour operation.

Mr Witney said the first order of 1500 quilts had already been filled and the company was now looking at future expansion into Asia.

“We’re very excited about it and hopefully this will just be the start,” Mr Witney said.

Bambi Enterprises was founded by Mr Witney and his wife Jan 35 years ago and started off making wool baby-seat covers in their garage at Tascott.

Their product range expanded over the years and a factory was eventually built in Dell Road at West Gosford. The factory has already doubled in size and is set to expand again.

Bambi uses a range of natural materials in it’s quilts including wool, alpaca, Tencel (plant fibre), and Ingeo (corn fibre).

It’s a true family affair with son Greg as General Manager, daughter Emma handling customer relations, and another son Tim previously involved in sales.

There are 30 people currently employed by the company.

JD.com is a Chinese online retailer based in Beijing. It is one of the two largest such companies in China and as of September 2017, it had 258.3 million monthly active users.

JD.com is also a leader in high tech and artificial intelligence delivery systems using drones, autonomous vehicles and robots. It has recently started testing robotic delivery services and building drone delivery airports, and has unveiled its first autonomous delivery truck.

Source: http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/central-coast/bambi-enterprises-signs-agreement-to-supply-alpaca-quilts-to-jdcom/news-story/fd6bc256d7f35de4bb496c01edffc472

1222_interview_650x455-300x210

In the market for a new job? You’ve probably been urged to “pursue your passions,” “leverage your network,” “tailor and tidy up your resume,” “do your homework,” and “dress for success”—among other things.

“These are foundational aspects to job seeking that are timeless,” says Teri Hockett, the chief executive of What’s For Work?, a career site for women.

David Parnell, a legal consultant, communication coach and author, agrees: “Much of this has been around long enough to become conventional for a reason: it works,” he says. “If you take a closer look, things like networking, research, and applying to multiple employers are fundamental ‘block and tackle’ types of activities that apply to 80% of the bell curve. They hinge upon casting a broad net; they leverage the law of averages; they adhere to the fundamentals of psychology. It’s no wonder they still work.”

But some of it “does get old and overused, because job seeking is as unique and creative as an individual,” says Isa Adney, author of Community College Success and the blog FirstJobOutofCollege.com. “When you ask any professional who has achieved some level of greatness how he or she got there, the journey is always unique, always varied, and rarely cookie-cutter. Most have, in some capacity, followed their passion, used their network, and had a good resume–but those things are usually part of a much bigger picture, and an unpredictable winding path. Instead of always following the exact by-the-book job seeking formulas, most were simply open to possibilities and got really good at whatever it is they were doing.”

We’re not saying you should discount or disregard traditional job seeking advice altogether. But it can’t hurt to mix it up and try less conventional approaches until you achieve your goals, Hockett says.

“Times are always changing and while it’s always good to follow the basic advice, we also have to get rolling with the times,” says Amanda Abella, a career coach, writer, speaker, and founder of the Gen Y lifestyle blog Grad Meets World. “For instance, group interviews are making a comeback, we’ve got Skype interviews now, or you may interview in front of a panel. All this stuff didn’t happen as often before–so while the same basic stuff applies, we have to take into account all the new dynamics.”

Hockett agrees and says if you are going to try some unconventional job seeking methods, you should “always be grounded with solid research and a clear direction of your intentions; then you will be ready for any opportunity to make a connection resulting in a positive impact on a hiring manager.”

Parnell says generally speaking, unconventional methods should be used sparingly, judiciously and only when necessary. “And when you do decide to use them, factor comprehensively by recognizing things like industry standards, personalities involved, and the general ilk of the position’s responsibilities, before strategizing.”

Here are 10 unconventional (but very effective) tips for job seekers:
1. Be vulnerable. It’s okay to ask people for advice! “Too often we think we have to sell ourselves as this know-it-all hot-shot to get a job, but I have found the best way to build relationships with people whom you’d like to work with (or for) is to start by being vulnerable, sharing your admiration for their work, and asking for advice,” Adney says. “I recommend doing this with professionals at companies you’d love to work for, long before they have a job opening you apply for.”

2. Don’t always follow your passion. “Follow your passion” is one of the most common pieces of career wisdom, says Cal Newport, author of So Good They Can’t Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love. “It’s also wrong.” If you study people who end up loving their work, most of them did not follow a pre-existing passion, he says. “Instead, their passion for the work developed over time as they got better at what they did and took more control over their career.”

Adney agrees to some extent. She doesn’t think job seekers should completely disregard their passions–but does believe that “challenging this conventional wisdom is vital, especially since studies still show most Americans are unhappy in their jobs.”

3. Create your position. Don’t just sit around waiting for your “dream job” to open. Study the industry or field that you’re looking to move into, and determine a company or two that you’d like to work for, Hockett says. “Then figure out their challenges through relationships or public information. With this, you can craft a solution for them that you can share directly or publically through a blog, for instance. The concept here is to get noticed through offering a solution to help them with no expectation of anything in return.”

4. Learn how to listen. Job seekers are so caught up in conveying a certain message and image to the employer that they often fail to listen.

“Powerful listening is a coaching tool, as well as an amazing skill to have in your life,” Abella says. “The art of conversation lies in knowing how to listen– and the same applies to job interviews. Know when to talk, when to stop talking, and when to ask questions.”

When you practicing for interviews, don’t just rehearse your answers to questions like, “can you tell me about yourself?” “why do you want this job?” and “what are your greatest strengths and weaknesses?” Practice listening carefully and closely without interrupting.

5. Start at the top and move down. We learned from Chris Gardner (played by Will Smith) in The Pursuit of Happyness (the biographical film based on Gardner’s life) that you need to start from the top and move down. “Why approach human resources in hopes that your resume makes it to the hiring authority?” Parnell says. “Just get it there yourself. Be careful to use tact, respect and clarity during the process, but nevertheless, go straight to the decision maker.”
6. Build a relationship with the administrative assistant. While you want to start at the top (see No. 5), you’ll eventually want to build strategic relationships with personnel at all levels.

“A terribly underutilized resource is an employer’s administrative assistant,” Parnell says. “As the manager’s trusted counterpart, there is often only a slight social barrier between the two. They know the manager’s schedule, interests, responsibilities and preferences. Making friends or even engaging in some quasi-bartering relationship with them can make all the difference in the world.”

7. Don’t apply for a job as soon as you find it. The worst part about job hunting is the dreaded scrolling of an online job board, applying for job after job, and never hearing back, Adney says. “When you find a job online that you’re really interested in, applying is the last thing you should do. Instead, research that company and the professionals who work there, and reach out to someone at the company before you apply for the job, letting them know you admire what they do and would love their advice.” Then, ask questions via e-mail or phone about what they like and find challenging at their job, and ask if they have any tips for you. “Most likely they will personally tell you about the job opening (you should not mention it) and then you can ask them about getting your application and resume into the right hands,” she says. “It is a great way to keep your applications from getting lost in the black hole of the Internet.”

8. Focus on body language. You’ve probably heard this before—but job candidates don’t take it seriously enough. “Body language is incredibly important in job interviews,” Abella says. “Watching yours (posture, your hands, whether or not you’re relaxed, confidence) will help you exude confidence,” she explains. “Meanwhile paying attention to the interviewer’s body language can let you gauge whether or not you’re on the right track.”

9. Don’t focus on finding a job you love now. Don’t obsess about how much you’ll enjoy a particular job on day one, Newport says. Most entry-level positions are not glamorous. “The right question to ask when assessing an opportunity is what the job would look like in five years, assuming that you spent those years focusing like a laser on developing valuable skills. That’s the job you’re interviewing for.”

Adney agrees. “When choosing a job early in your career or early in a career change, focus less on how much you would love doing the functions of the job and focus more on where you will have the greatest opportunity to add value to the company, network with top people in your industry, and have the ability to get your foot in the door of a company that mostly hires internally.”

10. Become their greatest fan. Once you find a company you’d love to work for, become their biggest fan. “Becoming a brand loyalist may lead to becoming an employee,” Hockett says. “But of course, you have to establish or participate in a forum where you’re constantly communicating that message; one they will see.” Organizations ideally want employees to love their company and be enthusiastic about their job. Loyal fans are passionate as consumers, and often make great employees because of this, she concludes.

Source: forbes.com

Weekly Jobs Update

Posted by | November 20, 2017 | Weekly Update

28753166 - photo of business people hands applauding at conference

If you’re looking for a job on the Central Coast, we applaud your decision in choosing JobsOnTheCoast.com.au to start your search!  Click here to start searching for jobs in this beautiful region!