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MICHAEL Cassel, it seems, is a man with more titles than Roger Federer.

He was tasked with leading the revitalisation of Newcastle and co-ordinating Newcastle’s light rail delivery. And now Mr Cassel will add another job title to his impressive curriculum vitae: chief executive officer of Central Coast Regional Development Corporation.

Planning and Housing Minister Anthony Roberts announced the appointment on Monday as the government released plans to revitalise and enhance the Gosford city centre.

Mr Cassel said he looked forward to working with Central Coast Council, Coordinator General Lee Shearer and other stakeholders to “help bring the bold vision for the region and its capital to life”.

Mr Cassel, the Revitalising Newcastle program director and chief executive of the Hunter Development Corporation, has overseen the Newcastle light rail construction.

Mr Roberts said Mr Cassel had been “instrumental in leading change and transforming Newcastle”.

Source: https://www.lakesmail.com.au/story/5332428/cassel-to-head-up-gosford-renewal/

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The first-ever Central Coast Festival of Women, held across several venues to celebrate International Women’s Day, was declared a success.

The festival recognised and celebrated the achievements and contributions of women on the Central Coast and raised awareness of gender issues still present in the community. The theme for the inaugural festival was ‘Press for Progress’. The Gosford RSL hosted the launch of the festival on Friday, March 2. The evening showcased the strong support for woman’s equality on the Central Coast, with many infl uential female leaders coming together to speak at the event. Among those present was Mayor, Jane Smith, Member for Dobell, Ms Emma McBride, Member for Robertson, Ms Lucy Wicks, Member for Gosford, Ms Liesl Tesch and Ms Anne Charlton, Labor’s candidate for Robertson. “There is more that unites us than divides us,” Ms Wicks said. “That is how we are going to press for progress, by focusing on the things that unite us,” she said. Mayor, Jane Smith, spoke about new initiatives being taken up by Central Coast Council to press for progress, including working toward becoming a white ribbon accredited workplace.

“That means a commitment from our leaders to update policies and procedures that will ensure a culture of respect and gender equality at all levels of our organisation,” Mayor Smith said. Ms McBride gave her speaking time to a 15-year-old student, Arabella, who overcame an issue of gender disparity at her school with the help of her local MP. Arabella was moved to tears as she described the feeling of empowerment and gratitude toward Ms McBride. “I was really taken back,” Arabella said. “There’s someone who actually cares. “It was incredible to realise that I had a voice and I could speak up,” she said. Ms Tesch reminded the audience that there is still work to be done, particularly in the area of Indigenous affairs. “I encourage everyone to walk alongside all of our Aboriginal sisters, because in that space, as women, we have a long way to go.”

Other events held as part of the festival included the International Women’s Day Lunch, hosted by the View Club Bateau Bay, at the Entrance Leagues Club, on March 6. The International Women’s Day Forum, hosted by Central Coast Community Women’s Health Centre, took place on March 7, followed by several International Women’s Day Breakfasts. The festival fi nished on Sunday, March 11, with the annual International Women’s Day Breakfast at the Reef Restaurant, The Haven, featuring guest speaker, Ms Joanne McCarthy, a Central Coast resident and Newcastle Herald journalist, whose investigation of child abuse in the Catholic church resulted in her winning the 2013 Gold Walkley Award for excellence in journalism. “I certainly hope this will become an annual tradition that we celebrate with great pride,” Ms Wicks said in concluding her remarks at the festival launch.

Source: Media release, Feb 12 Sally Jope, Central Coast International Women’s Day Organising Committee Event transcripts, Mar 2 Central Coast Festival of Women launch Olivana Smith-Lathouris, Journalist

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2018/04/festival-women-declared-success/

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When you’re a manager, your employees are constantly watching to see how you behave and what you say. As a result, it’s important to be intentional about your choice of words in any setting.

As the boss, there are certain things you probably shouldn’t say.

You’re probably aware of the more obvious statements, like:

“I’m only doing this because corporate is making me.”
“I really shouldn’t be telling you this, but…”
“I just need to vent to you about [Person]…”
However, in addition to these obviously-nots, there are a few others phrases that, although seemingly harmless, may end up hurting you and your team.

1. “Keep Doing What You’re Doing”

Leaders often say this to their high performers—the low-maintenance team members they know they can count on to deliver. It’s intended to encourage them to keep it up by letting them know they’re doing a good job.

Still, as an executive coach, I’ve heard time and time again from high performers how frustrating this type of feedback is.

Why? Because they’re often ambitious. They want to advance in their careers, and they crave feedback that will help them grow. The absence of constructive criticism sometimes exasperates them so much that they’re inclined to seek out other opportunities where they’ll get the mentorship they need to continue moving up.

A Better Alternative
To maintain your high performers (and keep them growing), try: “You’re excelling with X. Let’s give you an opportunity to stretch by giving you more chances to do Y.” Or, “You’re doing really well! Let’s explore your career goals so that I can make sure I’m coaching you to get you ready for your next step.”

2. “Was That Clear?”

While this might seem like a reasonable thing to say, it might not always give you an accurate picture of whether or not your team understands your intended message.

For example, I’ve often seen really bright leaders provide so much information that it overwhelms their audience. In those cases, people might not even know where to begin to respond to the question. Further, if this is posed in a group setting, people are less likely to speak up for fear of looking like the only person who’s confused.

Even in those cases in which your audience thinks that everything’s clear, they still might not be on the same page (like when you’re talking with a peer and realize that you’ve each walked away from a meeting with different conclusions).

A Better Alternative
Instead, say: “Let’s do a quick review of the key takeaways to make sure I articulated it clearly.” (Then, you can review them, or better yet, you could have other people in the room review them for you.)

3. “Failure Isn’t an Option”

While this might be something that’s appropriate for life and death situations, for most leaders this isn’t the sort of phrase you should be using too frequently.

Although it seems like it sets the bar high, the reality is that it’ll likely encourage mediocrity.

Think about it: If people are afraid to make mistakes, do you think they’ll be willing to experiment to see if they can make something better, or do you think they’ll stay safely within the bounds of what they know?

A Better Alternative
You can tell your team, “To be innovative, we’ll probably have to take some calculated risks. I don’t want us to make mistakes on purpose, but they’ll inevitably happen. Let’s make sure to learn from them so we can continue to improve.”

4. “Don’t Bring Me Problems, Bring Me Solutions”

This statement is usually meant to encourage problem-solving and proactivity. I’ve also seen it said by bosses who want to prevent employees from incessantly complaining about issues while doing absolutely nothing to solve them.

But according to Wharton professor Adam Grant, it can prevent people from speaking up about important issues they simply don’t know how to solve. This can result in leaders being unaware of where their team stands.

It can also create a “culture of advocacy” where people come to discussions highly invested in their solutions. As a result, they’re more concerned about selling their ideas than engaging with the group to work collaboratively.

A Better Alternative
To encourage your employees to speak up when needed, try: “To make this place better, we need to be aware of all problems—whether or not you know how to solve them. I’m also open to hearing your proposed solutions, too, so we can collaboratively improve our environment.”

To excel as a manager, you’ve got to be a great communicator. When you’re speaking, keep your goals in mind, and think critically about the messages you’re sending. With that sort of intentional communication, odds are you’ll have a positive impact on your team.

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/4-harmless-phrases-leaders-never-say-at-work?ref=recently-published-1

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You spend the last few months of 2017 saying, “Next year will be different.” And now it’s next year and you can’t really say that anything’s changed. You know what you want—it’s just that the closer you get to going after it, the more unsure you are.

You’re not alone in this feeling. But, instead of continuing to find every flaw in your idea, let’s first make sure that you’re not overthinking every step.

 

1. Every Time You Think About Doing Something Awesome in Your Career, You Immediately Think “I Shouldn’t…”

Are there times when something isn’t right? Sure, of course. But if every time you see an opportunity, you immediately think “I shouldn’t” or “I can’t” then you’re definitely overthinking it.

Here’s what to do instead: Let’s put your amazingly smart brain to action, and think about all the reasons why you actually can do something.

For instance: You think to yourself “Ugh, I’m way overdue for a raise. But I shouldn’t ask for one, I don’t want to be that person and I know my boss is busy.”

Which leads to you feeling terrible and nothing good happening.

Instead, why not try a phrase that starts with “I can” and is followed by “Here’s how.”

Let me give you an example. Start by saying: “I can ask for a raise.” And then add: “Here’s how: I’ll start by writing down all of the work I’ve done and make my case on paper. Then I can also make sure I schedule a time that works for her, so it won’t be a problem to sit down and have a conversation about this. Finally, I can focus on the fact that asking for a raise is a normal thing to do, as long as I’m polite and focused and positive, things will be OK.”

The combination of those two phrases does something magical to your brain. It distracts you from all the reasons why not, and gets you thinking about the good stuff like how it can be possible.

2. Whenever Your Friends Ask About Your Career, You Change the Subject

Have you ever been out with your friends, and someone asks you “How that’s job search going?” And you mumble something quickly and immediately move to another topic?

You aren’t alone! Frankly, we’ve all been there. Sometimes you just aren’t ready to talk about a big career move.

And sometimes you’re just plain scared of change, so instead of facing up to the fact that you’re beyond overdue, you keep changing the subject.

So, to determine which camp you fall into, ask yourself this question: “Is this just a tough moment, or am I honestly avoiding this question all the time?”

If the answer is “I’m avoiding this all the time” then chances are you’re over-thinking your next step and it’s time to face up to the fact that it’s 100% okay to ask for a raise, or to meet with your boss to talk about a promotion, or to even want a completely different job.

Usually, we dread the idea of something more than the thing itself, so the easiest way over the hump is to talk about your next steps with someone you trust. Even saying something like “I really want to change jobs, but I’m terrified of ending up unemployed” can help you move past the analysis paralysis and into action.

And action is where the magic happens.

3. You Endlessly Research Options, But Can’t Seem to Make Yourself Actually Do Anything

Have you ever researched…and researched…and researched…

And just when you feel like you have a solution or an idea for your career, you decide the right answer is “more research.”

You know, just to be safe.

If your answer to “What’s next in my career?” is always “more research” then you’re definitely over-thinking and it’s time for action.

Here’s what you do: Commit to researching two to three good options, and once you have your options in hand, it’s time to take action on them, instead of going back for more information.

So, for example, here’s what that can look like: You decide you want a new job. So you research several different companies but you can’t make yourself apply.

Instead of going back for more research, review all of the work you’ve done to date and then choose your best two options in terms of potential companies. Commit to applying to jobs at both. Don’t panic! Applying doesn’t mean “taking” but it does mean making progress.

 

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/signs-overthinking-career-change-new-job?ref=the-muse-editors-picks-2

Weekly local jobs update

Posted by | April 9, 2018 | Weekly Update

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Feeling inspired to achieve great things by our team at the Commonwealth Games?  Well, you may have just won gold in your job search, by clicking here to view the very latest job vacancies on the Central Coast.  Let Jobs On The Coast be your inside track to your next career opportunity!

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When I first started working, I never understood why people hated meetings so much. I love people, I love brainstorming conversations, and I love an excuse to not stare at my computer for several hours—how could they not be anything but great?

Of course, over time, I started to understand why they get a bad rap. Take away the fact that most meetings are inefficient, if not unproductive and a waste of time, it takes around 23 minutes and 15 seconds to get focused back on what you were working on before a meeting (which is why we’re big fans of turning unnecessary ones into emails).

As someone who’s (and knows many people who have also) had days of back-to-back meetings, I know how tough it can be to get all your other work done. Here are some tips for how to get through the day the best you can, if cancelling isn’t an option.

The Day Before

Prep for the Meeting
Chances are you know a couple days ahead of time when you’re going to have a day full of meetings. So, use that prep time to get organized.

Make sure you have everything you need to present or run each meeting. If you’re an attendee, go over any documents or agendas your colleagues have sent out to get a sense of what you need to bring and what’ll be discussed (if you have none of this, ask for it!).

Knowing what’s coming up will save you from scrambling day of to find files, or track down information, or waste any mental energy on being shocked at what you’re learning

Get Work Done Ahead of Time
Look at what you have coming up the day after the meeting. Is there anything you can get done in advance? By working through your lunch or staying just 30 minutes later than usual the day before, you can knock off some tasks and not end your meeting-filled-day feeling like you’re way behind.

Plan on How You’ll Take Advantage of Those Bits of In-between Time
Sometimes meetings end early. Sometimes they start late. And sometimes they get cancelled. (And sometimes the presenter spends the first 10 minutes trying to hook up their computer.)

Get ready to use those spare moments wisely.

Make a list of everything that can be done in under five minutes. Then turn to that list (and not social media) when you find yourself with minutes to spare.

Block Off Any Free Time You Do Have
Another no-brainer trick is to physically block off any time you have between meetings on your calendars.

The Day Of

Work in the Meeting (When Possible)
OK, I’m not giving you permission to not listen in the meeting, but I also realize that everyone does this at some point. And I also know that fires come up that you have to address, no matter how important the discussion is.

So, if there’s a lull in the conversation, you’re merely an observer in the meeting, or you’re certain you’re not needed in that moment, I give you permission to tackle any of those low-hanging fruits on occasion—whether it’s responding to a Slack, answering an important client email, or filling out a quick document.

Actually Eat Lunch
If it’s not completely taboo in your office, please eat lunch during the meeting. And, take bathroom breaks, even if it means leaving in the middle or running late to the next one. Oh, and, bring water and a snack with you so you don’t feel famished or dehydrated.

This will help keep your energy up so you can tackle stuff later on (more on that below).

Plan on it Being a Long Day
If your day’s going to be completely packed, then it might be worth getting into the mindset that you probably won’t be leaving when you ideally want to. It sucks to have to work outside your regular hours, but knowing that it’s coming will make it a little less painful.

Cancel Your Plans That Night
With that said, don’t make your day longer by having after-work plans. Not only will this put a deadline on how late you can work, but it’ll also just mean you end the day more exhausted than necessary. Instead, make it a self-care night that’s relaxing and stress-free.

Get in Early
Set your alarm a bit earlier than usual and get to the office before everyone else. This leaves you with plenty of distraction-free time to focus before the day really starts. And this goes for night owls too—even if you get in early and just spend the first hour making a to-do list for the day, you’ll feel better.

The Day After

Avoid This in the Future
You can try following these tips to cut down how many meetings you have to attend in the future.

Or, going back to the whole “blocking off your calendar idea,” you can make sure you block off two to three hours every day for your work. This helps to ensure that you will almost always have time to work. While you’ll of course have to move those blocks to accommodate other people and deadlines, it’s a great start.

No doubt about it that having a meeting-full day stinks. However, it’s not impossible to survive a day like this and still do your job (after all, if I can do it, you can, too).

 

Source:https://www.themuse.com/advice/how-to-survive-meetings-still-do-work?ref=recently-published-1

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The Central Coast could be heading for an education crisis as the region’s schools are pushed to beyond capacity by rampant residential development.

Literally thousands of major new residential units are either under construction or approved across the region. Hundreds more are proposed and pending decisions either from Central Coast Council or the Joint Regional Planning Panel.

In Gosford alone, the number of new units — and potential extra students – could be substantial. The Waterside development will contain 500 units when completed. John Singleton’s Bonython Tower will add 56 units. The recently proposed five tower residential complex at North Gosford will contain 400 more if approved. Other unit blocks are underway around Gosford Railway Station and in Hill Street.

All these fall within the catchment of Henry Kendall High School and Gosford Public School and are just one example of the coming major demographic shifts likely to impact on local schools.Central Coast P and C president Sharryn Brownlee warned that existing Central Coast schools would struggle to cope with a major influx of students unless there was a massive investment in permanent new classrooms, buildings and teaching resources, and even in new schools.

Mrs Brownlee said there was a real danger of schools becoming clogged with demountable buildings and outdoor spaces disappearing under “pop up” school buildings as the education department tried to deal with the problem.

She said school bus transport currently could not cope with transporting overflow numbers to nearby schools, adding to major traffic congestion problems.

“Henry Kendall High School as it is now could not accommodate extra children around Gosford without significant investment in new classrooms, buildings and teaching resources — you cannot have a demountable city just plonked down on the site,” Mrs Brownlee said.

“It can’t happen, its not educationally sound. It would destroy the learning environment — that’s the truth of it,” she said.

“Even relocating extra students to other high schools or bussing them temporarily is fraught with problems — Narara Valley High School is a long way from where the developments are and Lisarow High needs a huge upgrade just to cope with the existing students.”

Mrs Browlee said Gosford Public School was already at capacity and limited by the site.

“There was no forward planning around the relocation of that school — no extra land provision or thinking ahead,” Mrs Brownlee said.

LACK OF PLANNING
Mrs Brownlee said planning for development in greenfields sites in the north of the Central Coast had been better with a new primary school planned for that area, and a community consultation process in place.

“The question is — will that one school be enough and what are the department’s plans around high schools for that area?”

“We are concerned there have been no new school builds up here for years and capital investment is really behind where the population is,” she said.

“Wamberal is 20 years overdue for an upgrade, Point Clare is ten years overdue. Gosford Public School was rebuilt but with no future provision.

“The Department of Education demographers fought kicking and screaming to not build Kariong Mountains High School — which now has nearly 800 students enrolled.

“It’s a substantial, functional, quality high school — can you imagine if those 800 students were also added to Henry Kendall and those kids were commuting down there by bus?”

Mrs Brownlee said there should be an education impact statement with every new residential development.

“There is nothing more important than the mandatory 13 years of schooling but the impact of new developments on education is not properly considered in the DA process,” Mrs Browlee said.

“We don’t know what the education plans for the Central Coast are because there is a complete lack of transparency and no cohesive plan.”

Source: https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/central-coast/development-boom-could-lead-to-schools-crisis-says-central-coast-pc-council/news-story/c71403fee2c8d82360dfb7b645649b03

Weekly Local Jobs Update

Posted by | March 26, 2018 | Weekly Update

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HOW do you rate your quality of life on the Central Coast?

According to a Central Coast Council survey, 91 per cent of residents rate their quality of life as “good to excellent”.

The council has released community survey findings, which will go towards development of its first ever Community Strategic Plan.

Council’s connected communities director Julie Vaughan said the surveys followed on from the initial engagement where council received more than 33,000 ideas and opinions about what would make the Coast a better place to live.

“The community was asked to rate their overall quality of life living on the Central Coast with 91 per cent of survey respondents saying they had ‘good’, ‘very good’ or ‘excellent’ quality of life, which is fantastic for the Coast,” she said.

Ms Vaughan said quality of life appeared to trend upwards with age and was impacted by location of residence, employment status, level of education and home ownership.

“Lifestyle and community, including attributes such as safety, sense of community and opportunities to participate in community life were the key drivers of quality of life,” she said.

Coasties identified transport and movement around the Coast as top issues to be addressed over the next 10 years.

During the survey, council approached over 1200 community members and key stakeholders through a phone survey, community workshops and meetings.

Mayor Jane Smith said the community strategic plan would be a “true representation of what our community think, feel, want and value”.

The draft Community Strategic Plan will be going on exhibition in April.

 

Source: https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/central-coast/central-coast-council-survey-rates-quality-of-life-on-the-coast/news-story/9cb54d51d1445ed63b587d933f4f3696

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Unemployment or changing jobs or being stuck in a career rut is stressful no matter how you look at it, but when you multiply it by two, it can really take a toll on you and your relationship.

When my husband and I lost our jobs within six weeks of each other, we were in shock—and found ourselves spending a lot of time together, for better or for worse. During that harrowing period, we attempted to reinvent ourselves as professionals without losing who we were as a couple.

Now that we’re both collecting paychecks again, it’s easy to see many of the mistakes we made as we navigated the rocky road back to full-time employment together. The following is my hard-won wisdom on how to handle joint career stress without losing your peace of mind or your relationship in the process.

Respect Each Other’s Methods

Remember the old “opposites attract?” Well, my husband and I approached our job searches from completely different angles. I regarded it as a numbers games, sending my resume far and wide, while my husband was more strategic, cultivating connections and networking with everyone he’d ever met.

When I tried to convince him to give my way a go when some of his leads didn’t pan out, he insisted his strategy would eventually bear fruit. Likewise, when he suggested I get back in touch with people I hadn’t spoken with in years, I hesitated. Though we were skeptical of each other’s methods, neither of us was right nor wrong.

Respect your partner’s approach to their career, and if you can borrow what’s working for them and incorporate it into your own game plan, all the better. Because, ultimately, both tactics led us to new positions.

Work as a Team

During a rough career patch, you can definitely feel isolated and alone. If there’s an upside to facing it as a couple, it’s that you’ve got a partner who is attempting to overcome the same hurdle, which means your relationship has probably never been filled with more empathy. Use that compassion to cheer each other on and be encouraging on those dark days when your inboxes seem to overflow with rejection emails.

In addition to providing emotional support, you can benefit from having a ready and willing interview partner. Trust me, it’s a lot better to make mistakes in a mock interview with your significant other than with your would-be boss.

Be Gentle With Each Other

When you’re feeling raw and vulnerable during this time, something as small as a sideways glance can feel like a devastating slight.

Though it might be tempting to offer advice, sometimes your partner may just want to vent and know that their feelings are heard and valid. It’s important to keep communication open and figure out what makes each of you feel supported.

When my husband was passed over for a position we were almost certain he’d get, I found myself saying things like, “I don’t understand. How could you not have gotten it?” This ultimately wasn’t helpful for either of us. People process these life events in different ways, so treat each other with care.

Put Away Your Pride and Get Help if You Need It

There’s no denying that a career bump can cause your confidence to plummet while your stress level skyrockets. These factors can wreak havoc on even the most rock-solid relationship. Just remember, you’re not alone.

From career counseling to marriage counseling, if this period is taking a toll on your mental health or your relationship, seek help. Having a professional third party provide strategies for navigating this difficult period can assist you in getting back on track.

Though it may not feel like it while you’re in the thick of it, you will come out on the other side, and when you do, your relationship may be stronger for having weathered this challenging period nobly together.

 

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/how-to-deal-relationship-rough-career-change?ref=recently-published-0

Weekly Local Jobs Update

Posted by | March 19, 2018 | Weekly Update

Hawksbury_River_estuary_at_sunset._Sydney_Australia

Here is the place to see all the latest jobs on the beautiful Central Coast.

If you’re looking to live and work locally, take a look at our latest vacancies by clicking here!

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The Central Coast is the first region listed on the NSW Government’s new Regional Investment Prospectus, according to Member for Terrigal, Mr Adam Crouch.

Mr Crouch said he believed the recently-launched Regional NSW Investment Prospectus could attract national and international investment to the Central Coast. Launched by the Deputy Premier, Mr John Barilaro, the prospectus highlights the benefits and opportunities associated with domestic and international investment across regional NSW. Mr Crouch said the Investment Prospectus was an interactive online tool designed to attract national and international investment in regions across NSW, including the Central Coast. “The aim of this new Investment Prospectus is to highlight to investors the huge number of benefits associated with doing business and creating businesses in regional areas, including my electorate of Terrigal,” Mr Crouch said.

“Indeed, I am very pleased that the Central Coast is the first region listed on the new Investment Prospectus website,” he said. “With our region expected to grow by 75,000 people over the next 18 years, attracting investment is vital to ensuring that the Central Coast community has job opportunities on offer, and becomes an even more vibrant place to live.” Mr Barilaro launched the prospectus in the company of Consuls General and Trade Commissioners from 15 different countries. Mr Barilaro said he was thrilled to launch the website in front of a trade delegation of such size and stature as they toured regional NSW. “We want people from overseas to look at regional NSW and think, what a great place to start or grow a business, and that is what the Investment Prospectus is all about,” Mr Barilaro said. The Investment Prospectus will focus on supporting businesses that are expanding and developing new market opportunities, setting up greenfield operations, or planning to relocate to regional NSW.

 

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2018/03/investment-prospectus-features-central-coast/

Recruiters spend an average of six seconds reviewing a resume before they make the initial decision on candidates, according to research conducted by TheLadders, an online job-matching service for professionals. That means you have to win them over fast.

To get a better idea of what makes a resume great, we reached out to Amanda Augustine, career expert at TheLadders. She created an example of an excellent resume and allowed us to share it.

While resumes should be tailored to the industry you’re in, the one below offers a helpful guide for entry- and mid-level professionals with three to five years of relevant work experience.

What makes this resume so great? Augustine outlines the following reasons:

1. It includes a URL to the jobseeker’s professional online profile.

If you don’t include URLs to your professional online profiles, hiring managers will look you up regardless. Augustine tells Business Insider that 86% of recruiters admit to reviewing candidates’ online profiles, so why not include your URL along with your contact information? This will prevent recruiters from having to guess or mistaking you for someone else.

2. It uses consistent branding.

“If you have a common name, consider including your middle initial on your resume and online professional profiles to differentiate yourself from the competition,” says Augustine. For example, decide if you’re Mike Johnson, Michael Johnson, or Mike E. Johnson. Then use this name consistently, be it on LinkedIn, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook.

3. It includes a single phone number and email address.

“Choose one phone number for your resume where you control the voicemail message and who picks up the phone,” she advises. The same rule applies to an email address.

4. It does not include an objective statement.

There’s no point in including a generic objective about a “professional looking for opportunities that will allow me to leverage my skills,” says Augustine. It’s not helpful and distracting. Ditch it.

5. Instead, it includes an executive summary.

Replace your fluffy statement with an executive summary, which should be like a “30-second elevator pitch” where you explain who you are and what you’re looking for. “In approximately three to five sentences, explain what you’re great at, most interested in, and how you can provide value to a prospective employer,” Augustine says.

6. It uses reverse chronological order.

This is the most helpful for recruiters because they’re able to see what you’ve been doing in recent years immediately, says Augustine. “The only time you shouldn’t do this is if you’re trying to transition to another career altogether, but then again, in this situation, you’ll probably be relying more on networks,” than your resume, she says.

7. It uses keywords like “forecasting” and “strategic planning.”

Many companies use some kind of screening process to identify the right candidates. You should include the keywords mentioned in the job posting throughout your resume.

“Identify the common keywords, terminology, and key phrases that routinely pop up in the job descriptions of your target role and incorporate them into your resume (assuming you have those skills),” advises Augustine. “This will help you make it past the initial screenings and on to the recruiter or hiring manager.”

8. It provides company descriptions.

It’s helpful for recruiters to know the size of the company you used to work for, advises Augustine.

“Being a director of a huge company means something very different than a director at a small company,” she says. You can go to the company’s “About Us” section and rewrite one or two lines of the description. This should be included right underneath the name of the company.

9. It does not list achievements in dense blocks of text.

Recruiters receive so many resumes to scan through at a time, so make it as easy as possible for them to understand why you’re perfect for the job. Dense blocks of text are too difficult to read, says Augustine.

10. Instead, achievements are listed in three bullet points per job.

Under each job or experience you’ve had, explain how you contributed to or supported your team’s projects and initiatives.
“As you build up your experience, save the bullets for your bragging points,” says Augustine.

11. It quantifies achievements.

“Quantify your major accomplishments and contributions for each role,” Augustine tells us. This can include the money you saved or brought in for your employer, deals closed, and projects delivered on time or under budget. Do not use any more than three to five bullet points.

12. Accomplishments are formatted as result-and-then-cause.

A good rule is to use the “result BY action” sentence structure whenever possible. For example: “Generated approximately $US452,000 in annual savings by employing a new procedure which streamlined the business’s vendor relationships.”

13. White space draws the reader’s eyes to important points.

Recruiters do not spend a lot of time scanning resumes, so avoid dense blocks of text. “The key is to format the information in a way that makes it easy to scan and recognise your job goals and relevant qualifications,” Augustine tells us.

14. It doesn’t use crazy fonts or colours.

“Stick to black and white colour,” says Augustine. As for font, it’s best to stick with the basics, such as Arial, Tahoma, or Calibri.

15. It does not include pronouns.

Augustine says you should never write your resume in third person because everyone knows you’re the one writing it (unless you go through a professional resume writing service).

Instead, you should write it in first person, and do not include pronouns. “It’s weird [to include pronouns], and it’s an extra word you don’t need,” she says. “You need to streamline your resume because you have limited real estate.”

16. It does not include images.

“Avoid adding any embedded tables, pictures, or other images in your resume, as this can confuse the applicant-tracking software and jumble your resume in the system,” says Augustine.

17. It doesn’t use headers or footers.

It may look neat and concise to display your contact information in the header, but for “the same reason with embedded tables and charts, it often gets scrambled in an applicant tracking system,” says Augustine.

18. Education is listed at the bottom.

Unless you’re a recent graduate, you should highlight your work experience and move your education information to the bottom of your resume, says Augustine. Never include anything about your high-school years.

19. It doesn’t say “references upon request.”

Every recruiter knows you’re going to provide references if they request it so there’s no reason for you to include this line. Again, remember that space on your resume is crucial so don’t waste it on a meaningless line, Augustine tells us.

 

Source: https://www.businessinsider.com.au/why-this-is-an-excellent-resume-2013-11

Weekly local jobs update

Posted by | March 12, 2018 | Weekly Update

Brisbane_Waters,_Koolewong_(39065174414)

If you want to find work on the beautiful Central Coast, you’ve found the place to start your search!  Click here to see the latest job vacancies this week.

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A GROUP of young secondary school students on the Central Coast are finding out that small actions can make a big difference to the community.

MacKillop Catholic College in Warnervale launched a new community service program called JUMP (Josephites Undertaking Mission Projects) with its Year 7 students last year and it is already seeing a change in attitudes.

While some previous programs at the school had been seen as a chore, students are going above and beyond to get involved in this program, clocking up many more hours of volunteering than the required 15 hours annually.

Samuel Wolscher, 14, and now in Year 8, has already clocked up 40 hours since last term.

One of his key activities has been helping cook meals for the homeless at Coast Shelter in Gosford.

“Also, last year I did a food drive and packed baked goods and sent them to the shelter,” he said.

“You get to see what other people’s lives are like and it really puts things in perspective.

“You see how many people actually need help, and you feel really good that you’re making a difference.”

Another student, Charlotte Hannan, 13, has been painting office walls and murals at the Oasis Youth Centre in Wyong, and preparing for an upcoming ANZAC Day service on the Coast.

“I think it’s a good idea,” she said. “It gives you so many opportunities to reach out and help in the community.

“There are so many things out there you can step out and help with.”

School outreach co-ordinator Michelle Baxter said the program showed students that no matter their background, or whether they were sporty or academic, they could get involved.

“I think for them to hear the stories of other people is important,” she said.

“Another great thing with this program is that our students all get to be a part of it.

“This program is for everybody — everyone can contribute, everyone can make a difference.”

Mrs Baxter said the program would be rolled out as each new cohort of Year 7 students started at the school.

MacKillop Catholic College has been taking part in Catholic Schools Week.

The school is holding a Kinder and Year 7 enrolment information night for existing and prospective parents on Wednesday, March 21 at 6.30pm.

Upcoming Catholic school open days

Primary Schools

St Patrick’s, East Gosford, Monday, April 9, 6.30pm

St Brendan’s, Lake Munmorah, Tuesday, March 27, 9am – 10.15am & 6pm – 7pm

Our Lady Star of the Sea, Terrigal, Tuesday, March 27, 6.30pm

Our Lady of the Rosary, The Entrance, Tuesday, March 13, 9.30am – 11am & 7pm – 8.30pm

St Mary’s, Toukley, Monday, March 26, 7pm

St John Fisher, Tumbi Umbi, Tuesday, May 1, 10am – 11am & 7.30pm
St John the Baptist, Woy Woy, Tuesday, April 3, Enrolment information, 7pm, Wednesday, April 4, Under 6 Morning, 9.30am

Our Lady of the Rosary, Wyoming, Friday, March 9, 4.30pm – 7pm, Tuesday, March 20, Kindy Parent Information Evening, 7pm – 8pm, Wednesday, March 21, Under 6 Fun Morning, 9.15am – 10.45am

St Cecilia’s, Wyong, Tuesday, April 10, 7pm, Wednesday, April 11, Open Day/Fun Morning, 9.15am

Secondary Schools

St Brigid’s Catholic College, Tuesday, March 13, 1pm – 5.30pm

St Peter’s Catholic College, Monday, March 12, 4pm
Source: https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/central-coast/year-7-students-make-a-change-in-the-community/news-story/88016b23226a38b2a9d98839c24b8d1b

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20 years ago, you probably would’ve laughed if someone said your life would one day be irrevocably changed by a company called Google. What’s a google?

But, as you know, Google’s become the largest entity in one of the biggest tech companies in the world. And it’s giving you a glimpse inside its robust research on what makes a great manager.

It’s no secret that being a good manager can make all the difference in how happy your team is and how well it performs. Google not only proved this to skeptics years ago, but also identified eight (later updated to 10) behaviours of its best managers. So why not learn from one of the most successful data-driven companies out there?

1. “Is a Good Coach”

Employees need and appreciate a manager who takes time to coach and challenge them, and not just when they’re behind.

As Muse contributor Avery Augustine put it, “When it comes to clients, the squeaky wheel usually gets the grease.” The same is true, she said, of employees you manage.

But “I realized that every employee needs to be managed—star performer or not,” she wrote. “And simply leaving some employees to do their jobs without any type of feedback or guidance was detrimental to their career development.”

2. “Empowers Team and Does Not Micromanage”

Micromanaging’s a common mistake managers make without even realizing it, one that discourages and frustrates employees.

But Google’s research found that its best managers don’t, instead offering the right balance of freedom and advice, showing they trust their direct reports, and advocating for the team, according to a sample breakdown from an internal presentation included in a 2013 Harvard Business Review article.

3. “Creates an Inclusive Team Environment, Showing Concern for Success and Well-Being”
In the first iteration of the list, this was described as “expresses interest in and concern for team members’ success and personal well-being.”

Several years later, the company’s updated this entry to reflect research on psychological safety that allows for risk-taking—which Google identified as an important characteristic of effective teams—and unbiasing, or the process of becoming aware of and combatting unconscious biases.

It’s not enough just to have a diverse team, good leaders and managers strive to create an inclusive environment every day.

4. “Is Productive and Results-Oriented”

Employees don’t want to work for a lazy boss. They’d rather be part of a team that’s productive and successful, and that’s hard to do if the leader doesn’t set the tone.

Former Muse editor Adrian Granzella Larssen explained that becoming a boss means you have to be on model behavior.

“As a manager, you’ll be looked to as a role model,” she wrote. “You can’t expect people to give their best at work if they don’t see you doing it, so be sure you’re always on your A game.” That means putting in the effort and getting results.

5. “Is a Good Communicator—Listens and Shares Information”

Communicating effectively is one of the basics of being a good manager (or a good employee for that matter). But it’s also important to remember that great managers prioritize listening.

“Focused, curious listening conveys an emotional and personal investment in those who work for us,” according to Muse contributor Kristi Hedges. “When you listen to people, they feel personally valued. It signals commitment.”

6. “Supports Career Development and Discusses Performance”

Google recently added the “discusses performance” component to this behaviour. The company pointed to research from Gallup that found only half of employees know what expectations they should be fulfilling at work.

“To free employees to take initiative and inspire high performance,” Gallup concluded, “managers need to set clear expectations, hold employees accountable for meeting them and respond quickly when employees need support.”

In other words, managers should not only help their team develop skills and advance their careers, but also be clear about expectations and give honest feedback about performance.

7. “Has a Clear Vision/Strategy for the Team”

Stephanie Davis, who won one of Google’s Great Manager Awards, told HBR that feedback reports helped her realize how important it was to communicate team vision in addition to company vision.

“They wanted me to interpret the higher-level vision for them,” she said. “So I started listening to the company’s earnings call with a different ear. I didn’t just come back to my team with what was said; I also shared what it meant for them.”

A clear and shared vision can also help members of your team work well together.

 

8. “Has Key Technical Skills to Help Advise the Team”

When Google first released its list of behaviors, the findings were somewhat anti-climactic. “My first reaction was, that’s it?” Laszlo Bock, then the Vice President of People Operations, told The New York Times in 2011.

The entries on the list may’ve been obvious, but their relative importance wasn’t, as Bock’s team found out when it ranked the behaviours.

“In the Google context, we’d always believed that to be a manager, particularly on the engineering side, you need to be as deep or deeper a technical expert than the people who work for you,” he said. “It turns out that that’s absolutely the least important thing. It’s important, but pales in comparison.”

So all hope isn’t lost if you find yourself managing people who know more than you.

9. “Collaborates Across Google”

Google recently extended its list by two when its employee survey found that effective cross-organization collaboration and stronger decision-making were important to Googlers.

Whether you’re at a large corporation, an early-stage startup, or a nonprofit, managing your team and leading it to success can depend at least in part on how well you can work with other teams.

Muse contributor Rebecca Andruszka gave some tips for improving communication with other departments for “the collective betterment of the company” (and, as she wrote, to avoid feeling like you work in Congress).

10. “Is a Strong Decision Maker”

Google’s last addition is a reminder that while it’s important for a manager to listen and share information, employees also appreciate one who can make decisions.

Muse Founder and President Alex Cavoulacos urged managers to go one step further and tell their teams not only what decision they’ve made, but also why they’ve made it. The small extra effort helps the team understand context and priorities, improve their own future decision-making, and stay engaged as well as informed.

One of the reasons this research was so effective was that it used internal data to prove what makes managers great at Google (and the company’s re:Work website provides some first steps for others who want to try to replicate its approach).

But that doesn’t mean the list isn’t helpful for people who don’t work there. After all, Google did go from being a made-up word to a household name in just a few years. People and companies now look to it as an example, not only in innovation, but also in its approach to management.

 

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/10-behaviors-make-great-google-manager?ref=recently-published-2

Weekly local jobs update

Posted by | March 5, 2018 | Weekly Update

Ourimbah Creek | Doug Beckers

Whilst it may be true that money and jobs don’t grow on trees, Jobs On The Coast has plenty of local job listings to kick off your search.  Click here to take a look!

 

 

 

Photo: Ourimbah Creek by Doug Beckers
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The NRMA has applied to upgrade a number of its cabins at its Ocean Beach holiday park. The cabin upgrades will involve three new elevated cabins each with two bedrooms.

They will be located on six dwelling sites (numbers 34 to 39) that will be amalgamated to form three new sites, according to the application lodged with Central Coast Council. The NRMA has asked that each cabin is permitted to have two ensuites, a living room, kitchen and deck. “In total, the proposal intends to add 10 toilets, 10 shows and 10 sinks for the use of temporary guests at the holiday park,” said a report submitted with the application.

“As the land slopes slightly in this location, there may be the need for a 600mm high retaining wall parallel to the road. “The installation of the retaining wall is exempt development and does not form part of this application,” the report said. The applicant has argued that the proposed development would be minor and does not require any removal of trees or earthworks, it claimed there would be no impact on the natural or built environment. “The development will have a positive social and economic impact as it will improve the park’s facilities for guests and potentially attract more tourists to the area. “In addition, the works will provide short-term employment.”

SOURCE: Gosford DA Tracker, 20 Feb 2018 DA53741/2018, Central Coast Council

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2018/02/nrma-applies-upgrade-cabins-ocean-beach/

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A Government-sponsored community housing project has been officially opened in Woy Woy on February 22 by Member for Terrigal, Mr Adam Crouch.

Talia on Chambers was developed by in a joint venture between local community housing provider Pacific Link Housing, and Evolve Housing, which will see the development of more than 80 new dwellings across three sites on the Central Coast and Western Sydney. Talia on Chambers is the first completed project by Evolve Pacific Developments which contains 31 studio apartments, including two accessible and eight adaptable apartments for people with disability.

The building also contains accommodation for an onsite caretaker. Speaking at the opening, Pacific Link Chairman, Mr David Bacon, said the development model for the provision of new social and affordable housing was an excellent way forward in addressing the chronic shortage of housing for people in need.

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2018/02/community-housing-project-officially-opened/

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So, you’ve got a gap in your resume? Maybe you decided to travel, or go back to school, or maybe you looked after a sick relative, or you took time out to be a parent yourself. Whatever the reason, you’re probably feeling like your job hunt is going to be that much harder. Surely any recruiter looking at your resume is going to run a mile away.

Not necessarily.

Most employers nowadays recognize that it’s rare for anyone to stay with just one or two companies for their whole career. Plus, job security isn’t what it used to be (unfortunately).

As a recruiter, I’ve interviewed my fair share of candidates, and if there’s one piece of advice I can give you, it’s this. Think about how to present your gap. With a little foresight, you can turn a potentially tricky interview situation into a masterclass in personal branding.

1. So, You Lost Your Job
Some people find it embarrassing to talk about being laid off, but it’s unlikely to elicit anything but sympathy from your interviewer. It’s fairly commonplace these days. Just remember not to badmouth your past company or boss. Instead, focus your response on all the positive things you achieved while you were there.

Don’t Say
“That #!&$! company had it in for me from day one. I probably would’ve left anyway.”

Do Say
“Unfortunately, the company had to implement some budget cuts and, due to their ‘last-in, first-out’ policy, I was made redundant. However, I’m proud of what I achieved during my time there, something which can be reinforced by my previous manager, who’s one of my referees.”

2. So, You Quit Your Job and Traveled the World
The key with this one is to focus on how traveling contributed to your personal development, rather than how much fun you had schlepping around the world with nothing but a backpack and a smile. If you took on any paid or volunteer work during this time, concentrate your response on the additional personal and professional skills it’s given you.

Don’t Say
“Well let’s face it, partying in Thailand is a lot more fun than going to work. I’m pretty sure I had an awesome time, but I can’t actually remember most of it.”

Do Say
“I spent a number of years working at a company in a very demanding job, in which–as you’ll see from my references–I was very successful. But I’d reached a stage in my career where I wanted to focus on my personal growth. The time I spent traveling taught me a lot about how to get along with people of all ages and cultures. Now I feel more than ready to jump back into my career with renewed energy and focus and I feel this role is the ideal way to do that.”

3. So, You Went Back to School
This is perhaps the easiest one to explain. Particularly if what you did is relevant to your chosen career. Even if not, it’s easy to put positive spin on something that requires a certain level of intelligence and hard work.

Don’t say
“I’m still trying to figure out what I want to do with my life, so I stayed in school rather than getting a job. I am still uncertain if this career path is right for me.”

Do Say
“I wanted to expand my career options by completing some training/getting a qualification in x. Now that I’ve achieved my educational goals, I’m looking forward to using my qualifications to benefit the company I work for. This role is the perfect way for me to do that because…”

4. So, You Took Time Off for Health Reasons
Brevity’s key here. The interviewer won’t expect (or want) you to go into painstaking detail about an attack of depression or a serious back operation. Prepare a straightforward explanation that you’re comfortable sharing. Mention how proud you are that you were able to overcome your health problems and then move the conversation swiftly into the present day by discussing the relevant skills you have to offer this company.

Don’t Say
“Whoa, yeah, things were pretty bad there for a while..”

Do Say
“I went through a tough time emotionally/physically due to… and I took some time out to concentrate on getting better, so I could get back to work as quickly as possible. I’m pleased that I overcame that challenge because it’s made me a stronger person but now I’m fully recovered and ready to focus on the next stage of my career.”

5. So, You Had to Take Care of Your Family
Remember, caring for the sick or elderly and raising a family are tough jobs that require a huge range of skills, which you now have in abundance. No interviewer should make you feel like your decision to prioritize family over career reflects badly on you.

If you had time to keep your skills and industry knowledge up to date, make sure you mention this. End the discussion by telling the interviewer that you’re excited to recommit yourself to your career. And remember, any company worth your time and effort should recognize what an all-round superhero you clearly are.

Don’t Say
“I live the closest to my mom so I drew the short straw in having to take care of her. I just couldn’t handle looking after her and holding down a job!”

Do Say
“After a lot of thought, I decided that my top priority was my child/elderly parent/sick spouse. However, I made sure to keep my professional skills up to date during that time. Now I’m in a position to refocus on my career and I’m looking forward to utilizing all the additional soft skills I’ve learnt.”

Lastly, remember that lying on your resume or in interview is a really bad idea. When you’re asked about a gap in your employment, take a deep breath and acknowledge the interviewer’s concern. Stay composed and don’t get defensive: it will reassure the interviewer that you’re confident and comfortable with your reasons so there’s no reason why they shouldn’t be too.

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/explain-resume-gap-interview-right-way?ref=the-muse-editors-picks-1

CC Festival

The Lakes Festival is celebrating its fourth year in November, and Central Coast Council is looking for new and exciting event ideas to join the 2018 Festival Program.

The Lakes Festival is a 10-day event which celebrates the beautiful waterways across the Central Coast. In 2017, the Festival attracted over 60,000 patrons over the 10 days, with over 600,000 people reached via a strong marketing campaign including print, outdoors, social media and radio. “Do you have an innovative idea?” a Council spokesperson said. “Think outside the box and get involved. “Examples of ideas we are looking for include art based events, major events, sculpture events/ projects, digital media and installation events/ projects, or any other innovative event you can think of. “Events are assessed by the committee on their potential to involve the local community and visitors to the region,” a Council spokesperson said. Events must incorporate the lake, either via location or theme, and should be located around one of the below event hubs: McKenzie’s Reserve, Budgewoi, Canton Beach Foreshore, Long Jetty Foreshore, Picnic Point, The Entrance, Gosford Waterfront, Ettalong Beach and any other waterways on the Central Coast (pending approval).

“This year you will be able to apply for funding via Central Coast Council’s grants program to assist with getting your idea/event off the ground,” a Council spokesperson said. “The two types of grants you can apply for are a Community Partnership Grant or a Place Activation Grant. “The Community Partnership Grant aims to support existing local community events and projects, and you can apply for funding for between $5,000 and $20,000 (combined cash and in-kind). “It is specifically designed for activities and events that have grown and are of interest to a particular community or provide benefit to the Central Coast Community.

“Eligible applicants for this grant include a legally constituted not-for-profit organisation, a group auspiced by a not-for-profit organisation, and a business.” A Place Activation Grant is provided to support individuals, artists, community organisations, members and businesses to deliver activities in the areas of Place Making, Creative Industry and Social Enterprise. “You are able to apply for funding up to $5,000 under this grant, with the grant focusing on a new activity that enhances our local community, creates public artwork, or helps develop a social enterprise that is unique and creative”, the Council spokesperson said This is open to community groups, a business, artists or individuals. Applications close on Wednesday, Feb 28. Source: Media release, Feb 14 Central Coast Council Media.

 

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2018/02/new-ideas-sought-lakes-festival/

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You know the feeling. You’ve been selling for a few years, you’re regularly hitting your numbers, and you think you’re ready for a promotion. But sales is a labour-intensive job. The day-to-day stress can be deflating, and most of the time, it takes everything you’ve got just to meet your goal.

So, how do you get to the next level without taking your foot off the revenue pedal? Not by working an extra three hours every day—that’s only going to burn you out. Instead, do a few little things every day to flex your leadership muscles and still meet goals.

Here are five smalls tasks to incorporate into your daily workflow to build towards a promotion. And remember, it’s not about getting the position, it’s about becoming the person who deserves the position.

1. Help Your Colleagues
You might not have the title of sales leader, but by helping your co-workers you can start being a leader on your floor today. After all, a title won’t make people follow you, their trust and belief in you will—and you don’t need a title to build that.

New reps always need help when they start. Ask if you can help them ramp up and find success. It might be as simple as telling them how to access certain software or letting a new rep listen to a few of your calls. Or, offer to do a few ride-alongs.

When you have small talk with co-workers, ask them how they’re doing and really listen to their response. Then, ask to help.

A few months ago, I noticed a recently promoted colleague struggling to perform. We decided to review a few call recordings and see if we could identify gaps. Turns out, an hour of my time was enough to kick his performance into high gear.

2. Stop Eating Alone
If you’re like me, you’re glued to your computer and phone most of the day, spilling lunch on your keyboard and slurping down quick mugs of coffee on your way back from the kitchen.

Instead of staring at your screen for 10 straight hours, use lunch or coffee breaks to network. If you sell for a company with multiple sales teams, meet with reps and leadership in other teams to learn what their segments are experiencing.

Learn how they made it to where they are today. What was their first job? Did they attend any special trainings or classes? What was their big break, and what did they do once they got there? Pick someone who’s career you’d like to emulate and ask them what steps you should take to achieve the same type of growth.

3. Understand the Skills You Need
And find out how to get them. Be honest with yourself—you’ll need to know how to do more than hit an individual quota when it comes to managing a team.

If you’re a great salesperson but don’t know how to interview people, ask your boss, “If I hit 115% of goal, can I sit in on your next interview call?”

Have hiring down but need to be better at running efficient meetings? Ask for the opportunity to run your team’s weekly call review if you exceed next month’s goal. Need to work on one-on-one coaching? Ask if you can mentor someone on the sales team.

It might be hard in the beginning, but telling your boss you’d rather receive these opportunities than a bonus will show how serious you are about making it to the next level.

4. Solve a Problem
To find growth opportunities, look for company or team gaps and fill them. Is there a communication gap between sales and marketing? Find out how to fix it. Does your company have a major initiative coming up? Get ahead by solving potential pain points.

I knew someone who kept getting crushed by competitors when he was a sales rep. He was selling software that was difficult to install, and his competitors beat him every time because they had partnerships with software implementation specialists.

Instead of taking this problem to his boss and complaining, he made his own deal with an implementation company and started winning business—a lot of business.

His company took notice of the increased volume and asked for his secret. When he told them what he’d been doing, they decided to scale his partnership framework and put him in charge.

5. Always Be Learning
Leadership requires a broad skill set, and reading gives you the alternative strategies you need to excel in your daily work. If you’re not reading sales books and blogs, you should be.

Think you don’t have time? Load up on sales and leadership podcasts or audiobooks on your commute or while you’re cooking dinner.

And, if your company offers class reimbursement, take advantage and enroll in local or online seminars.

Lastly, regularly attend meetups or other networking events in your city. You can learn as much from other people facing similar challenges as you can from the pages of a book.

It’s one thing to want a promotion and another thing to work for one. Start by incorporating these five strategies into your workflow, and see your manager and co-workers take notice.

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/how-to-get-a-promotion-in-sales?ref=recently-published-0

Weekly local jobs update

Posted by | February 19, 2018 | Weekly Update

pearl-beach-005

Summer is in full swing and it isn’t only the weather that’s heating up!  This time of year is also when we see the jobs market warm up.  Click here to see our latest local jobs on offer in our beautiful region.

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New smart planning should mean less cars

There has been some discussion lately about the future of the Peninsula with mayor Cr Jane Smith and Peninsula Chamber of Commerce president Mr Matthew Wales talking about the need for a renewed urban design.

This may be so, but what is the chamber’s real vision? The Peninsula needs an urban design that benefits the whole community and would include low-rise, mixed-use buildings with active street frontages, more trees and open spaces that will create a better urban amenity than currently exists. It doesn’t need more traffic lights and more layers of car parking. One of the main points of a coherent urban design is the transport system. The Member for Gosford, Ms Liesl Tesch, is on the right track in relation to transport (Peninsula News, January 29), although what is required is future thought on transport and living spaces around the Peninsula that reflects projected climate change, sea level rise and technology.

The Peninsula needs a complete solution involving vertically integrated public transport for residents, commuters, school children and the elderly, not one-off projects. One possibility is the implementation of a light rail. Research by a Canberra university has shown utilisation of rapid transit can be successful in urban and regional areas of lower density and can be city-shaping, transforming communities when combined with long-term strategic urban planning.

A trackless light rail such as the ART in China could deliver considerable financial, social and environmental benefits to the area. This includes a flow-on effect to diversifying the economy, improving livability for the community and sustaining the environment by reducing traffic congestion and transport disadvantage, and increasing value capture and health via more walkable suburbs that are connected across the Peninsula.

Smart cities provide active transport, reliable sustainable public transport and urban design that responds to population growth but enhances the livability of locations. The money suggested to be spent on any major car parking project should be utilised in establishing a transport-orientated design project that services the whole of the Peninsula, looking at reducing traffic volumes rather than old engineering paradigms of more cars, more spaces to park them in and more traffic lights.

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2018/02/new-smart-planning-mean-less-cars/

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I feel like I need more than just a traditional resume or cover letter in order to stand out to the tech companies I want to work for. What else can I do to separate myself from the competition that’s applying to these innovative companies?

Dear Desperate to Stand Out,

You really hit the nail on the head. Competition’s tough across the board and tech is leading the way.

Your first step to getting noticed is to get in the right mindset. What does that mean? Don’t think like a recruiter, but more like a marketer. Your product is your experience. Here’s how a marketer would sell it.

1. Focus on Presentation
Maybe you’re not a graphic designer, but that shouldn’t be stand in the way of creating an eye-catching resume. There are plenty of tools that make design easy for everyone—many even offer templates designed by experts.

And don’t just stop there. Think of all the other points of contact a recruiter could have with you—including your LinkedIn profile, other social media handles, a blog, an online portfolio, and so on. Make sure they are all polished and contribute to a cohesive personal brand.

2. Spread the Word
A solid resume or cover letter doesn’t accomplish anything if the right people don’t see it. One surefire way to stand out is to proactively put it in front of the right people and to make it easy for them to notice it.

For example, there’s a story of a candidate who used Snapchat geo filters to advertise his portfolio in front of creative directors at the agencies he wanted to work for. You may not want to go that far, but that core idea has some merit. Think of how you can make yourself discoverable.

Don’t be intimidated. This can be something as straightforward as finding an acquaintance who works at the company and asking for a referral, or even dropping a friendly note to the hiring manager on Twitter or LinkedIn.

3. Make it Personal
Anything that starts with the dreaded, “To Whom it May Concern” will find it’s way to the trash can in a hurry. But, it’s hard to ignore a message when it’s highly targeted and personalized.

Start by showing that you took the time to get to know both the hiring manager and the company. Stand out from the competition by finding unique themes, attributes, projects, values, or needs you have in common and then incorporating those into your application materials.

Proving that you’ve done your homework on the role and the company empowers you to present yourself as a seamless fit, while also demonstrating your high level of interest in that opportunity.

Getting the job you want with the company you want to work for can be challenging. But, the right mindset and approach will help you reach your goals faster.

This article is part of our Ask an Expert series—a column dedicated to helping you tackle your biggest career concerns.

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/stand-out-against-tough-job-search-competition

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CENTRAL Coast doctor Michael Kale challenges anyone to frown while holding fairy floss and wearing a colourful, loud shirt.

“It’s just impossible,” he said.

Mr Kale and fellow Central Coast Local Health District doctor Benji Pfister were promoting the healthcare community through Loud Shirt Fairy Floss Friday last week.

Now in its second year, the event aims to raise awareness around the mental health and wellbeing of healthcare workers.

Mr Kale said the event started as a staff health promotion at Wyong Hospital, and had exceeded their expectations. The initiative has now become a registered national charity.

“It was never meant to be this huge movement, but we are so excited about it,” he said.

“We have expanded it to Wyong and Gosford, and now plan to package the event nationally.”

Mr Kale said the original idea for the event was influenced by his uncle Bruce Kale who lost his life to mental illness.

“My uncle ran an amusement ride business, so that’s where the idea of fairy floss came in,” he said.

“The fairy floss brings back nostalgic memories of childhood and innocence. Fairy Floss Friday encourages all members that make up the healthcare community to stand in solidarity against issues facing those who spend their lives saving the lives of others.”

Dr Pfister said there were other campaigns focused on the mental health and wellbeing of doctors and nurses, but few extended to all levels in the healthcare community.

Central Coast Local Health District chief executive Dr Andrew Montague said Mr Kale and Pfister had done an amazing job.

“One in five people in the community will experience issues with mental health, but this is higher for health care professionals,” he said.

“Rates of suicide are also higher with health care professionals, particularly doctors.”
Mr Montague praised the initiative for including all healthcare staff, from nurses to cleaners and administration workers.

“Mental health doesn’t discriminate, and it’s so important to highlight that it’s an issue which can face us all,” he said.

Source: https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/central-coast/loud-shirt-fairy-floss-friday-celebrated-at-coast-hospitals/news-story/a5ae96567de1bb5a5ef220bc51e57a2f

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Let’s be clear: It’s innovate or die out there.

Ideas are the currency that buys you a starring role in today’s workplace. But too many people prioritize ownership over adoption, and watch their ideas waste away as a result. Truth is, you’ll be more effective if you work collaboratively with a team to turn ideas into action.

Here’s why you should ditch the old ideation silo and give your best thoughts to the group.

Team Buy-In Makes Things Happen
Ideas are often the prelude to change, and change generally rubs people the wrong way. So, how to get around the very human—but avoidable—friction that comes from shaking things up? Go out of your way to gain your team’s buy-in on the things that may affect them.

Especially if you’re a manager, inclusive decision-making may not only get you a better outcome by melding more minds during the ideation and decision-making processes, it ensures that the team understands the motives and considerations behind new ways of working. Ultimately that means less pushback, a deeper awareness about what led to decisions in the first place, and a more evenly distributed stake in the outcome.

Whether or not you’re a manager, this is a good way to conquer any resistance to change.

Tap Into a More Diverse Range of Opinions
A team brainstorm may be no better than a private one if everyone in the group thinks the same way. You need to mix it up.

Study after study has shown that diverse groups—gender, sexuality, race and ethnicity, age, etc.—produce better ideas and make better decisions. Cloverpop, a company that tracks companies’ decisions to help them manage the decision-making process, found in a two-year study that gender-mixed teams comprising a wide range of ages and geographic representations made better decisions than homogeneous teams 87 percent of the time.

Makes sense. People with different backgrounds have different outlooks, motivations and experiences that shape their contributions at work. Hearing their voices and ideas produces a more well-rounded exchange of thoughts vetted by a wider variety of perspectives.

You may have to do some work to get a good mix of people in the room, but it’s worth it. While you’re at it, don’t discount less obvious diversity factors, like years of experience and time at your company.

See How Ideas Hold Up Against Messy Human Stuff
We’re all human, and regardless of race or gender or any of the other factors above, we’re simply wired differently.

For example, think about Myers-Briggs psychological types. People have different ways of perceiving and interpreting information, different thought patterns and emotional reflexes. The idealists on your team will have different ideas than the cynics. The process-oriented people will see things differently from the gut-driven types.

Working through ideas with a mix of personalities will help you find middle ground and flesh out a plan of action that works for everyone.

Test Your Assumptions
Idea sharing can be a valuable vetting exercise if everyone’s encouraged to speak candidly. Ask people to poke holes in your logic, to prove why your proposal won’t work, and to name every single thing that could possibly go wrong. The harder to tear down, the better the idea. Use the feedback to reformulate your idea until you’ve patched the flaws.

If you’re a team lead, this is even more critical. Sometimes you have to design new ways of working but you’re not the best person to do so because you’re not the closest to the facts on the ground—the people who work for you are. They can probably see the peril that lurks in a new idea right off the bat, and they’ll respect you more for recognizing that and hearing what they have to say.

Turn Ideas Into Action
In some ways, the idea is the easy part. The real challenge is executing.

If you think of ideas not as inventions that come out of thin air but as innovative solutions to complex problems, you and your team will have a better foundation for brainstorming.

And in the end, you’ll have a much easier time activating ideas if they’re vetted by a diverse group willing to provide constructive criticism, even if it means swallowing some pride and surrendering credit for the outcome.

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/why-your-next-big-idea-should-come-from-a-team?ref=recently-published-2

Weekly Jobs Update

Posted by | February 11, 2018 | Weekly Update

Video content gets up to 10 times more reach and engagement compared to links and images.

Boost your job vacancy with a video campaign to reach even more of our Central Coast local job seekers.

 

Click on ‘Submit a Job’ to list your vacancy.  Don’t forget to upload your logo for inclusion in the advert and video and we will create a video job ad campaign tailored to your vacancy.

Weekly local jobs update

Posted by | February 5, 2018 | Weekly Update

woy woy fun run

A month in to the new year, it’s important to keep your career resolutions on track!  Now may be the time to revisit the career goals you set yourself and ensure that checking JobsOnTheCoast.com.au for the latest local opportunities is one of them.  Keep an eye out for your next big step by clicking here.