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We all face many situations that require making career decisions. Everyone will manage these in their own way, as each career is unique.

It makes sense for each of us to take as much control of our careers as we can. In doing so, we’ll be better placed to generate our own career plan and make the decisions needed to put it into action.

Learning how to make effective career decisions is crucial. It will help you to:

  • manage and take control of your career
  • adapt to change
  • take advantage of career opportunities as they arise.

What’s your decision-making style?

Decision making can be complex. To reach a choice, we need to take account of our current values, interests, aptitudes and preferences as we try to make sense of the information, ideas and impressions coming from the world around us.

How do you make important decisions? Most people have their own preferences. These can range from working intuitively and according to what feels right, to doing things step-by-step in an ordered, rational and systematic way. Some people may keep things to themselves, weighing up decisions in their own head. Others will want to involve people they know, gathering and testing out their ideas and thoughts.

Reflect on the career decisions you made when you were selecting your senior subjects at school.

  • How certain were you about your next steps?
  • How did you go about making your decision?
  • Were there any important influences?
  • To what extent was it a well-thought through, conscious decision, based on research?
  • Did you collect a lot of information and generate a range of options?

3 obstacles to effective decision-making

Making decisions that affect your career can be complex for several reasons.

  1. The consequences of a decision can be significant – but it’s usually not possible to have all the information.
  2. There may be many alternatives, each with its own set of trade-offs and compromises.
  3. Career decisions can involve complex interpersonal issues arising from the involvement from other people, including our family, partners and friends.

Given these barriers, it’s not surprising that most of us have at some stage made career decisions that weren’t entirely rational and logical. Instead, circumstances and our emotions influenced them.

Good career decisions will depend on your readiness

It’s common for people to try to make career decisions without asking themselves whether they’re feeling ready to do so. Here are some reasons why you may not be ready to make a specific career decision:

  • You may lack motivation and feel that given enough time the ‘right’ career choice will ‘just happen’.
  • You may be indecisive and confused by decision making in general.
  • You may have beliefs and assumptions that aren’t based in reality. For example, ‘I believe there’s only one ideal career for me’ or ‘I only get one chance at making a career decision’.
  • You may find it difficult to commit to a specific career choice, fearing that you may miss out on a better option.
  • You may find it challenging to balance the importance of your ideas with the importance of other people’s ideas (especially of people close to you).

Getting ready to make an effective career decision begins with self-awareness. Put some time into reflecting on your decision-making style. What do you need to find out, do or have to make this particular decision? Time? Information? Skills? Commitment? Inspiration? Support? Confidence? Other resources? How might you make, develop or find what you need?

 

Source: https://myfuture.edu.au/career-insight/details?id=a-quick-guide-to-making-career-decisions#/

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The NRMA has bought Fantasea Cruising, operators of the Palm Beach to Patonga, Ettalong and Wagstaffe ferry service.

NRMA Group chief Mr Rohan Lund announced the acquisition on Thursday, October 25, as part of the NRMA’s aim to become Australia’s largest provider of transport and tourism services. “Today’s announcement of NRMA’s acquisition of Fantasea Cruising, 12 months after we bought Manly Fast Ferry, sees our fleet of vessels grow to 31 and boosts our capacity to unlock the potential of Sydney’s waterways, offer fantastic experiences to people wanting to enjoy our city and connect the Central Coast with Palm Beach,” Mr Lund said.

“When Sydney was born the majority of its transport needs were met by our sprawling harbour and network of waterways; 200 years later and the NRMA wants the city to again realise the potential of its waterways,” he said. Fantasea provides a range of transport and tourism services, harbour cruises, ferry services and yellow water taxis across Sydney Harbour in addition to the Palm Beach to Central Coast service.. The Fantasea fleet comprises 10 ferries and 10 water taxis.

“Fantasea has a diverse and modern fleet of vessels and their operational approach to customer service aligns with the NRMA,” Mr Lund said. “We welcome their staff to the NRMA family and look forward to working to deliver unique experiences to our customers in Sydney and the Central Coast,” he said. “As the NRMA group of businesses grows so too does our capacity to provide much-needed transport solutions to a community keen to get around faster and provide membership value to our 2.6 million members.” NRMA members currently get 20 per cent discounts on selected Fantasea services and the organisation will look to provide further member-exclusive offers and specials, Mr Lund said.

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2018/11/nrma-buys-palm-beach-ferry-service/

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The Australian Reptile Park has blitzed the Central Coast NSW Regional Business Awards, taking out four awards at this year’s ceremony.

The park took out the Excellence in Business and Regional Business of the Year Awards. The park’s, Amanda Woodbine and Tim Faulkner, also took out individual awards, with Woodbine picking up the Outstanding Young Employee Award, and Faulkner the Outstanding Business Leader Award. Other local businesses who took home honours on the night included: East Gosford corporate marketing firm, Milestone-Belanova, which took out the Employer of Choice Award;

The Start Up Superstar Award went to The Opportunity Collective, a Central Coast not-for-profit that supports young people and women to empower their careers and lives; Gosford Private Hospital took out the Excellence in Innovation Award; and, Gosford’s, Laura Prael, took out the Outstanding Young Entrepreneur Award, for her work with LEP Digital.

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2018/11/reptile-park-wins-four-regional-business-awards/

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One of the practices that contributes to Michael Phelps’ success as a swimmer takes place well before he gets into the pool. As part of his training regimen, Phelps visualizes every detail of his race—from responding to something going wrong (like ripping his suit) to crossing the finish line ahead of his competitors.

Phelps has used visualization (along with other training methods, of course) to achieve incredible things in his career, like winning 28 Olympic medals to become the most decorated Olympian of all time. But you don’t need to be a world-class athlete to borrow his tricks—and I’m living proof.

Visualization has played an absolutely essential part in hitting a number of my career goals, such as pitching high-profile clients with confidence, scaling my business to six figures, and tackling large, complex projects without feeling completely overwhelmed. My visualization practice has, in many ways, acted as the bridge between where I am in my career at any given moment to where I want to be—by allowing me to see and feel my future success before it actually happens.

“Think about building a jigsaw puzzle. Have you ever attempted to build one without having the box top to look at? It is extremely difficult to complete the puzzle without knowing what the outcome should look like,” says executive leadership coach Cynthia Corsetti. “You may fit pieces together, you may get bits and pieces of the puzzle done, but it will take longer, be more challenging, and possibly never reach completion.”

Corsetti believes the same is true of your career; the more clear and detailed you are when you visualize what you want from your career, the easier it will be to make it a reality.

Of course, while visualization can definitely help you improve performance, for the best results, you need to pair it with action. Phelps didn’t just visualize himself winning races—he also spent hundreds and hundreds of hours in the pool.

Want to give visualization a try? Here’s what you need to know to get started.

Visualization 101

What’s Visualization?

Before we jump into how visualization can completely transform your career, let’s quickly cover what, exactly, visualization is.

“Visualization is the ability to create a clear picture in your mind of the exact circumstance you wish to create,” says Corsetti. “It has also been called setting intention, attraction, and ‘positive thinking,’” she adds. It’s “an actual skill that a person can learn.”

Visualization is seeing, feeling, and completely embodying a future outcome—whether that’s snagging the corner office, completing a marathon, or buying your dream home—before it happens. By creating your desired future outcome in your mind in as much detail as possible, you can actually transform your visualization into reality.

The Science

How Does Visualization Actually Work?

When you visualize yourself hitting a specific goal, your brain interprets that imagery as reality—and, as a result, creates new neural pathways to support that reality.

“Visualization is effective at boosting performance because it activates the same regions of the brain that are activated when actually performing a task—athletic, academic, [or] anything else,” says Roselyn Smith, a licensed psychologist, hypnotherapist, and management consultant. “It actually changes the pattern of our electrochemical brain waves.”

In other words, by using visualization, you’re tricking your brain into acting as if your desired outcome—whether that’s nailing a presentation, landing a big promotion, or launching your own business—has already happened. And because your brain thinks your desired outcome has already happened, you’re more likely to take the actions necessary to align with your brain’s perceived reality.

Visualization can even cause physical changes. One study found that participants who visualized workouts were able to increase their muscle mass by 13.5% over the course of 12 weeks—even though they never stepped foot inside a gym. (Imagine how much more they’d have gained if they’d actually worked out!)

The Exercises

What Visualization Exercises Can I Do to Be More Successful at Work?

So research has shown that visualization can work. But how, in practice, do you use it to make you more successful? Here are a few exercises to get you started.

Start With Basic Visualization
If you’re just hopping on board the visualization train, you’re going to want to start with the basics. Carve out a few quiet minutes each day to sit down, close your eyes, and picture where you want to go, who you want to be, and what you want to do in your career. You can start small (like picturing yourself rocking an upcoming presentation) or go big (like celebrating your first six-figure year in business).

The key to this exercise is being as specific as possible. See what’s going to happen clearly in your mind. Home in on all the small details, from what you’re wearing to the way you’re speaking. And let yourself experience the emotions that go along with the visualization (so, for example, the sense of pride you’d feel when landing a raise or the rush of excitement you’d get when you launch a new product). The more realistic you can make your visualization, the more effective it’ll be.

Picture the Worst-Case Scenario

There are bound to be obstacles on any career journey. With visualization, you can anticipate what they’ll be—and come up with a plan so you know exactly how to handle them when they arise.

Let’s say, for example, that you’re gearing up to pitch a new project idea to your team. Visualize all the things that could go wrong—your presentation crashes, you forget important information in the middle of your pitch, your team says they’re not interested—and, more importantly, how you’ll handle them.

Entrepreneur Tim Ferriss calls this “fear-setting;” basically, you spend time imagining all the potential worst-case scenarios and how you’d navigate them. This way, you’ll be prepared and have a game plan if and when it happens, and you’ll be much more likely to succeed as a result.

Focus on Specific Skills or Goals

As the previously mentioned study showed, practicing a task in your mind can yield measurable results—even if you never practice that task IRL.

Want to become a better public speaker? Spend time visualizing yourself speaking to large crowds. Want to increase the number of potential clients you speak to each day? Picture yourself hitting the phones and connecting with tons of prospects each day. The point is, the more you practice the skill in visualizations, the better you’ll be at said skill in reality.

Write it Down

Have a hard time visualizing things in your mind? No worries! Writing down your visualizations can be just as effective as picturing them in your head—perhaps even more so.

“I have my clients write a story that describes in detail what they want their future to look like—down to the pictures on the wall of their office,” says Corsetti. “Adults learn by using all their senses. By writing the exercise they are using their thoughts as well as the physical activity of writing which seals the idea and makes it more concrete.”

The Next Steps

What Else Do I Have to Do?

Clearly, visualization is a powerful tool. But here’s an important reminder: If you want to see real results, you need to pair it with tangible actions. You can visualize yourself calling up 100 client prospects a day—but if you never actually pick up the phone, you’re not going to get the results you’re looking for.

It’s “more than just ‘think about it and it will happen,’” says Corsetti. “You see, when you visualize yourself as a leader, or as an entrepreneur…you have to start to respond [and act] as you would in that role.”

So, for example, if you’re visualizing yourself landing a coveted promotion, in addition to picturing yourself in this new role, you need to start acting as if you’re already in it, whether that means taking on more responsibility, mentoring newer members of your team, or logging extra hours at the office.

And when you pack this one-two punch—visualization and action? “Opportunities begin to present themselves. You attract people and circumstances that will help you get there,” Corsetti explains. “It literally steps up your game on a daily basis.”

Visualization is like a roadmap for that old saying—if you can dream it, you can achieve it. Because the right exercises can help you imagine the career you want. And with that vision, plus the corresponding actions, you can start making it a reality.

 

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/visualization-exercises-boost-career

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A Pearl Beach restaurant has been awarded a Chef’s Hat in the 2019 Good Food Guide for the fourth year running.

Pearls on the Beach proprietors Scott and Melissa Fox received the Hat at the Good Food Guide Awards held on October 8. “We’re the only hatted restaurant on the Central Coast and we’re really proud to be recognised as one of the best restaurants in the country for the fourth time,” Mr Fox said.

Mr Fox describes Pearls as a contemporary Australian restaurant with an international menu, nestled right on the sand of Pearl Beach. He attributes Pearls’ success to his and his wife’s understanding of what makes a good dining experience, their expert team and a refusal to pigeonhole Pearls into any one box. “Melissa and I moved to the Coast after growing tired of living in Sydney,” Mr Fox said.

“We wanted a sea change and there were no doubts about moving to the Coast,” Mr Fox said. The Foxs’ have been running Pearls ever since and celebrated 16 years as owner-operators back in June. “Melissa and I are both country kids. “We grew up knowing that food tastes better when you pick it out of the ground, not off a shelf, and I think that’s always been refl ected in our menu,” Mr Fox said. Unlike others, their menu is not fixed and instead changes, sometimes weekly, depending on the quality of produce that season.

“We try to build our menu around the best and freshest produce on the market. “We don’t do signature dishes and instead focus on putting out food that inspires us and I think that gives us an edge over other restaurants on the Coast. “We like to keep our menu open and that helps us appeal to more diners.”

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2018/10/restaurant-wins-fourth-chefs-hat/

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So, you’ve got a gap in your resume? Maybe you decided to travel, or go back to school, or maybe you looked after a sick relative, or you took time out to be a parent yourself. Whatever the reason, you’re probably feeling like your job hunt is going to be that much harder. Surely any recruiter looking at your resume is going to run a mile away.

Not necessarily.

Most employers nowadays recognize that it’s rare for anyone to stay with just one or two companies for their whole career. Plus, job security isn’t what it used to be (unfortunately).

As a recruiter, I’ve interviewed my fair share of candidates, and if there’s one piece of advice I can give you, it’s this. Think about how to present your gap. With a little foresight, you can turn a potentially tricky interview situation into a masterclass in personal branding.

1. So, You Lost Your Job
Some people find it embarrassing to talk about being laid off, but it’s unlikely to elicit anything but sympathy from your interviewer. It’s fairly commonplace these days. Just remember not to badmouth your past company or boss. Instead, focus your response on all the positive things you achieved while you were there.

Don’t Say
“That #!&$! company had it in for me from day one. I probably would’ve left anyway.”

Do Say
“Unfortunately, the company had to implement some budget cuts and, due to their ‘last-in, first-out’ policy, I was made redundant. However, I’m proud of what I achieved during my time there, something which can be reinforced by my previous manager, who’s one of my referees.”
2. So, You Quit Your Job and Traveled the World
The key with this one is to focus on how traveling contributed to your personal development, rather than how much fun you had schlepping around the world with nothing but a backpack and a smile. If you took on any paid or volunteer work during this time, concentrate your response on the additional personal and professional skills it’s given you.

Don’t Say
“Well let’s face it, partying in Thailand is a lot more fun than going to work. I’m pretty sure I had an awesome time, but I can’t actually remember most of it.”

Do Say
“I spent a number of years working at a company in a very demanding job, in which–as you’ll see from my references–I was very successful. But I’d reached a stage in my career where I wanted to focus on my personal growth. The time I spent traveling taught me a lot about how to get along with people of all ages and cultures. Now I feel more than ready to jump back into my career with renewed energy and focus and I feel this role is the ideal way to do that.”

3. So, You Went Back to School
This is perhaps the easiest one to explain. Particularly if what you did is relevant to your chosen career. Even if not, it’s easy to put positive spin on something that requires a certain level of intelligence and hard work.

Don’t say
“I’m still trying to figure out what I want to do with my life, so I stayed in school rather than getting a job. I am still uncertain if this career path is right for me.”

Do Say
“I wanted to expand my career options by completing some training/getting a qualification in x. Now that I’ve achieved my educational goals, I’m looking forward to using my qualifications to benefit the company I work for. This role is the perfect way for me to do that because…”

4. So, You Took Time Off for Health Reasons
Brevity’s key here. The interviewer won’t expect (or want) you to go into painstaking detail about an attack of depression or a serious back operation. Prepare a straightforward explanation that you’re comfortable sharing. Mention how proud you are that you were able to overcome your health problems and then move the conversation swiftly into the present day by discussing the relevant skills you have to offer this company.

Don’t Say
“Whoa, yeah, things were pretty bad there for a while..”

Do Say
“I went through a tough time emotionally/physically due to… and I took some time out to concentrate on getting better, so I could get back to work as quickly as possible. I’m pleased that I overcame that challenge because it’s made me a stronger person but now I’m fully recovered and ready to focus on the next stage of my career.”

5. So, You Had to Take Care of Your Family
Remember, caring for the sick or elderly and raising a family are tough jobs that require a huge range of skills, which you now have in abundance. No interviewer should make you feel like your decision to prioritize family over career reflects badly on you.

If you had time to keep your skills and industry knowledge up to date, make sure you mention this. End the discussion by telling the interviewer that you’re excited to recommit yourself to your career. And remember, any company worth your time and effort should recognize what an all-round superhero you clearly are.

Don’t Say
“I live the closest to my mom so I drew the short straw in having to take care of her. I just couldn’t handle looking after her and holding down a job!”

Do Say
“After a lot of thought, I decided that my top priority was my child/elderly parent/sick spouse. However, I made sure to keep my professional skills up to date during that time. Now I’m in a position to refocus on my career and I’m looking forward to utilizing all the additional soft skills I’ve learnt.”

Lastly, remember that lying on your resume or in interview is a really bad idea. When you’re asked about a gap in your employment, take a deep breath and acknowledge the interviewer’s concern. Stay composed and don’t get defensive: it will reassure the interviewer that you’re confident and comfortable with your reasons so there’s no reason why they shouldn’t be too.

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/explain-resume-gap-interview-right-way?ref=the-muse-editors-picks-2

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Cowra Business Chamber has been officially announced among the finalists for the 2018 NSW Business Chamber State Business Awards.

The NSW Business Awards celebrates business excellence in entrepreneurship, innovation, export, business growth, sustainability and employment practices.

The State Finalists represent the category winners from 16 regions across NSW.

Winners will be announced at the NSW Business Awards Gala dinner on Friday 23 November 2018 at Luna Park, Sydney.

The finalists in the Local Business Chamber category alongside Cowra are:

Wyong Regional Chamber of Commerce, Central Coast.

Cooma Chamber of Commerce, Far South Coast.

Tomaree Business Chamber, Hunter.

Corrimal Chamber of Commerce & Industry, Illawarra.

Croydon Park Business Chamber, Inner West Sydney.

Campbelltown Chamber of Commerce & Industry, Macarthur.

Port Macquarie Chamber of Commerce, Mid North Coast.

Deniliquin Business Chamber, Murray-Riverina.

Gunnedah and District Chamber of Commerce and Industry, New England North West.

Riverside Business Chamber, North Eastern Sydney.

Evans Head Business and Community Chamber, Northern Rivers.

Double Bay & Districts Business Chamber, South Eastern Sydney.

Sydney Hills Business Chamber, Western Sydney.

 

Source: https://www.cowraguardian.com.au/story/5718479/cowra-business-chamber-named-as-a-national-finalist/

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The ability to sell yourself, develop new skills and offer relevant experience are just some of the ways you can stand out in today’s jobs market.

You should also prepare, dress appropriately and listen to the questions asked to avoid common jobseeker mistakes.

Many jobseekers are failing to stand out and do themselves justice in today’s market. For instance, when an employer recruits, they want a proven performer who can hit the ground running and add immediate value to the business.

This means you need to consolidate the experience you have. Use your skills and experience to show potential employers you are a tried and tested candidate.

If you are a graduate, professional work experience completed during your study is a huge benefit that will help you stand out from the crowd. Even a few weeks completed during semester break gives you an advantage over fellow graduates who have not taken the initiative to gain relevant experience.

Our top five tips to stand out:
1. Write an impressive resume: Make a good first impression. Use a common program, such as MS Word, and start with your contact details. List your education and qualifications and then your work experience in reverse chronological order, beginning with the most recent. If you have your own website profiling your work, include the URL, but do not submit it instead of a resume. Proof-read your resume and take the time to get it right.

2. Sell yourself: Highlight one or two unique selling points to differentiate yourself in your resume and in an interview. For example, were you one of the highest achievers in your university degree? Have you improved customer retention levels or led a project successfully? Have relevant examples and statistics at your fingertips.

3. Experience: The most valuable skill a jobseeker can have is relevant experience. For seasoned professionals, this means matching your existing skills and experience with the job requirements. For graduates, this means gaining relevant industry experience through volunteer work or a study placement.

4. Use your networks: Contact a recruiter, search job websites, use social media sites such as LinkedIn and talk to your networks, industry bodies and university alumni.

5. Develop new skills: Stay on top of industry trends to demonstrate to an employer that as their industry and business moves forward, you are moving forward with it.

Our top five mistakes to avoid:
1. Arriving late for your interview: Interviewers have heard every excuse when it comes to candidates arriving late. There should be no excuse. Anticipate traffic or public transport delays and leave the house earlier than you normally would. Often, you will only get one chance to get your foot in the door.

2. Failure to prepare: Another common jobseeker mistake is to fail to research the organisation prior to your interview. A company’s website, professional bodies, annual reports, your networks, and your recruitment expert will help you gain a better understanding of the business and how your experience and skills match. Use this to prepare for likely interview questions and prepare questions to ask at the end of the interview.

3. Dressing inappropriately: You should look professional, act professionally and dress professionally for your interview.

4. Inability to listen: Listen carefully, give the interviewer your full attention and answer the questions asked. If you are asked behavioural questions, such as “Describe an occasion when …” you need to answer with a relevant real-life example. Do not evade the question as it is more obvious than you think.

5. Inappropriate use of social media: A growing number of employers are now extending their vetting process to include social media, particularly when they feel a candidate might not be what they are portraying themselves to be in an interview. Change your privacy settings and be sensible in the content you post online. Failure to be aware of your digital footprint is a huge mistake in today’s market.
Source: https://www.hays.com.au/career-advice/job-search/HAYS_238194

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Anyone who has built a career knows that finding your first job is a real challenge. There’s no class in college called, “How to Find a Job That Will Make You Happy,” and many stumble to carve out their own paths in those first couple of years.

When you’re on the verge of graduating, it’s tempting to get buried under online applications and advice from career counselors, all the while forgetting there’s one untapped resource right at our fingertips. Remember those people who raised you?

Your parents are a great resource for the job search process, serving as consultants who help you hone in on your strengths, tap into a wider network, prepare for an interview, and evaluate an offer. But don’t just take our word for it, we spoke with Campus Recruiters at Philips, Brett Romary and Rebecca Abrahams, about how to leverage your parents’ wisdom to make that big jump into your first job a great one:

Get Their Feedback
Your parents, it turns out, know you better than almost anyone. They’re a great resource to help you understand your strengths and passions. And luckily, parents are always there (remember when you couldn’t get away from them fast enough?). They can help with the job search process from the very beginning—from figuring out what cities you want to live in, to what kind of role you want to pursue.

As you consider the route you want to take—and the opportunities that arise from there—parents are a great sounding board to help you process this big life change. Rebecca says, “Young professionals and their parents would benefit from having a good conversation about each opportunity. Is this something that’s aligned with what you did in college and your interests?” You can be a bit more vulnerable (hopefully) with your parents than with your career counselor, which will help you to honestly examine how you feel about a certain opportunity.

That said, make room for your own instincts, too. Sometimes, parents want to sway you in a certain direction; building awareness around that will help you strike a balance between benefiting from their support and making independent decisions.

Tap Into Their Network
Parents have networks, even if they’re informal. These communities may be the key to making inroads into your first job, and they’re worth tapping into. “Making professional introductions is huge,” says Brett. “Parents probably have connections somewhere, whether they work in this field or not. They can really help candidates learn more; the possibilities of these connections are endless.”

Don’t dismiss your parents’ network just because they don’t work in a field related to your interests. Although it’s hard to believe, your parents are social beings. Maybe a neighbor, PTA member, or friend of your dad’s has your dream job. So, ask your parents to mention to their friends (and acquaintances) that you’re looking for a role—you never know what will come of it.

As Brett notes, “These communities often serve as the bridge between students who are just graduating and a job.” And, your parents’ network is one of the easiest ways to get your hat into the ring—you know your parents are dying to brag about your qualifications!

Ask for Professional Prep
Many parents have worked in a professional setting for years, if not decades, so they have a wealth of information about how to navigate a new job. Talk to your parents about the most important career lessons they’ve learned along the way. “Parents can really help their children develop business acumen within the field,” Brett says.

In no situation is this truer than in the interview process. “Young professionals are really nervous because they’ve never interviewed before,” says Brett. “We tell them to practice; if their parents can help prep them at all, it’s a huge plus.”

Set aside time to do a few mock interviews with mom or dad. This kind of exercise will make it easier to get comfortable when you’re in front of a hiring manager, and ask your parents to give you helpful tips to improve your pitch.

Evaluate Compensation
When you’re evaluating a compensation package, it’s difficult to know where to even begin. You probably don’t know the difference between HMO and PPO insurance plans or have a clear sense of expectations for vacation days.

Online research can be really helpful, but if your parents have experience negotiating compensation packages, they could be your best resource. Rebecca says, “It can become really overwhelming to assess your first package because you’re not sure what’s the norm. That’s why we encourage students to talk to their parents.”

Beyond helping you assess the package itself, they can give you insight into whether the compensation is something you could really live on. Work with your parents to create a budget around your potential salary to make sure you can cover daily expenses, have savings, and plan for retirement.

As a young professional, you’re in the driver’s seat. But use the knowledge and experience of your parents, and give yourself a boost when you need one most. We bet your parents are going to give you unsolicited advice anyway, so why not solicit the advice you really need—that extra support from your parents could help you launch your career.

 

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/use-your-parents-as-resource-when-looking-for-job?ref=recently-published-1

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Young people are being asked to get involved and be a part of developing the first-ever Central Coast Youth Strategy.

As part of developing the Strategy, Central Coast Council wants to hear from young people and local youth services about what they see as important for young people who live, work or study on the Coast.

Throughout October and November, all young people aged 12-24 can complete an online survey which explores their views about life on the Central Coast and what they would like to see for young people, now and in the future.

The online survey will be complemented by face-to-face interviews at popular youth venues, events and schools, including focus groups with youth service providers.

Young people aged 12-24 make up 15.3% of the Coast’s population and Council is committed to shaping the new Youth Strategy so that it the concerns and they face.

To ensure as many young people as possible get involved, everyone who completes the online survey can enter the draw to win an iphone X.
Source: https://www.centralcoast.nsw.gov.au/council/news/young-people-to-shape-coasts-first-regional-youth-strategy

HU 22 09 18

YOUTH in Newcastle and the Central Coast are suffering higher unemployment than the national average, with more than 16 per cent of the region’s young people jobless, the NSW Business Chamber has revealed.

While youth unemployment rates nationally have been suffering since 2014, the Newcastle and Central Coast region’s unemployment rate for people aged 15-24 sits at 16.2 per cent, well above the national average of just over 12 per cent, the chamber said in a statement.

In response to these concerning statistics, Apprenticeship Support Australia (ASA) has commissioned the second Skillsroad Youth Census. The Skillsroad 2018 Youth Census follows on from a successful survey last year and is designed to highlight the hopes, fears and general attitudes of young people as they transition from school to the workforce, with a special focus on regional areas, the chamber said.

In 2017, more than 13,000 Australian youth completed the survey, revealing below-average life satisfaction and sense of well being, as well as significant levels of stress and uncertainty about choosing career pathways.

The 2018 census aims to build on existing knowledge from last year’s report.

“This census comes at a critical time for young people in the Newcastle and Central Coast area … who are facing an employment crisis,” ASA’s Hunter and North Coast branch manager Jeff Cooke said.

“The Skillsroad 2018 Youth Census can provide unprecedented, evidence-based insights for our schools, parents and business into the necessary tools required to properly support our young people.”

The census takes less than 10 minutes to fill out and participating youth will be in the running to win their choice of either a $1000 gift card or travel voucher. Weekly prizes of $100 gift cards will also be released over the duration of the census, and participants increase their chances of winning by referring friends to complete the survey.

The Skillsroad Youth Census is open to all Australian young people aged 15-24 and can be accessed at: http://bit.ly/Youth-Census-2018.

The census closes on September 30, with a report to be released on 15 October.

Source: https://www.theherald.com.au/story/5647189/employment-crisis-newcastle-youth-facing-higher-jobless-rate/

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Recently, I shut down a project I’d been working on for the last several months. It was a sentimental moment for sure—no longer spending my time on something that had been a big part of my day was certainly a tough pill to swallow. However, it was an experiment from the start, and I knew that once we got the results we needed, it would draw to a close.

Having to end—or in corporate jargon, sunset—an initiative you’ve been a crucial part of is bound to happen in your career, whether by your own accord or someone else’s. Maybe budgeting runs out, maybe it’s a bandwidth issue, maybe goals and priorities shift, maybe someone made a mistake assigning it in the first place.

Regardless, knowing how to wrap everything up in a pretty bow is an important skill—just because it’s coming to an end doesn’t mean you don’t have a responsibility to end it smoothly and professionally. Plus, when done correctly, you can use all you’ve learned and achieved for future career advancement.

Here’s how:

1. Gather All the Facts

Before doing anything, you need to understand why this project is ending. Ask questions, talk it out with relevant team members, and understand what this means for the long-term.

For starters, this could give you both confidence and perspective—especially if you’re concerned that it’s ending because of something you did (or didn’t) do.

This also helps you make more educated decisions going forward. When you know why a project is no longer needed, you can make smarter choices for future initiatives and ensure that you’re on the same page on:

  • whether this is a permanent, trial, or temporary initiative
  • how success will be measured
  • what the timeline expectations are

2. Set an End Date and Prepare

Next, get the little details sorted out. When will this be completed? Who will help in wrapping up loose ends? What’s needed to get done before it is? Who needs to be notified?

Once you know all this, you can start preparing immediately—both for the last day and for what comes after (if anything). You’re going to have more time on your hands after this is over, so figure out how you want to spend your time moving forward and what other projects you might like to start or be a part of. Make sure to talk to your boss to get a sense of what they want you to focus on and prioritize.

Also, take advantage of the time you have to complete this project. Is there an experiment you’ve been meaning to try? Or, a skill you’re looking to build? Use this stretch to test any last-minute ideas or thoughts.

3. Notify Your Team (and Anyone Else Who Was Involved)

This is key: Whoever was involved in some way or another—whether they helped out, contributed feedback, or just followed it passively—should be looped in.

Send out an email or set up a meeting outlining why the project is ending, what this means for each team member and the company, and what the next steps will be. Give your colleagues a chance to ask questions and contribute feedback (and jot that information down for step five).

4. Take the Time to Celebrate Key Players and Accomplishments

This goes hand-in-hand with step three, but it’s so important to acknowledge all the hard work and achievements associated with the project. Make sure to call out and celebrate those who helped and shout out any big positive outcomes that resulted.

Also, celebrate yourself! Whether or not it was a “success,” you spearheaded something and no doubt gained skills along the way (even if those skills are better project management). So, take the time to feel proud of the work you did.

5. Do a Reflective Analysis

Once you’ve closed up shop, gather everything you collected over the course of the project, both qualitative and quantitative:

  • What did you do?
  • How long did you do it for?
  • Who was involved? What did they do?
  • What results were you hoping for?
  • What results did you get?
  • What results didn’t you get?
  • What was surprising?
  • What mistakes were made?
  • What lesson were learned?

Define what success meant for this specific initiative, how you did (or didn’t) achieve it, and what can be learned for the future—and write it all down in a report.

Then, use that report! Having all this information in one place is incredibly valuable for a number of reasons:

  • It forces you and your team to be reflective. Set up some time to go over it all, discuss it, and add to it. Use it as a conversation starter for launching new projects or brainstorming other initiatives.
  • It helps you be strategic in making future decisions and prevents history from repeating itself. Whenever you come across a project or problem that feels similar, look back on this report to decide whether to move forward and how so you don’t make the same mistakes or fall down the same rabbit hole.
  • It’s physical proof of your achievements. You can bring this to your next performance review or reference it in your job search. Also, you can use it to just feel good about yourself—you did all this!

It’s certainly not emotionally easy to end a project you care about. But, by doing it in a well-documented, well-thought-out way, you make it easier for yourself to successfully lead future projects. And that’s a great thing.

 

Source: http://www.americanrecruiters.com/2018/09/14/heres-how-to-gracefully-sunset-an-initiative-youve-worked-so-hard-on/

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A $1-million shared pathway at Norah Head, and a $1.5-million cultural hub at Wyong are among six Central Coast community projects to win state government funding.

Parliamentary Secretary for the Central Coast, Scot MacDonald, said $5 million had been granted to Central Coast Council in the second round of the Stronger Country Communities Fund.

The six community projects to win funding on the Central Coast are.-

a shared pathway, Norah Head ($995,700);
outdoor water park at Peninsula Leisure Centre, Woy Woy ($850,000);
establishment of the Wyong Cultural Hub, Wyong ($1,500,000);
construction of a clubhouse at Don Small Oval, Tacoma ($259,000);
a shared pathway, Tuggerawong ($542,269); and
amenities upgrade of Adelaide Street Oval, Tumbi Umbi ($908,616).

Mr MacDonald said he was pleased to see a wide range of recreation activities supported across the Central Coast.

“The establishment of the Wyong Cultural Hub will provide a centralised and accessible space for the Central Coast’s creative sector to flourish,” Mr MacDonald said.

“The funding for two separate footpath and cycleways on Bungary Road in Norah Head and along the Tuggerawong foreshore will support pedestrian safety and encourage greater cycling uptake by the local residents.”

In Thursday’s paper: Community gathers to express concern over Bath Street development

Mayor Jane Smith welcomed the investment in the arts, sporting and recreational opportunities.

“Our community’s vision is for a smart, green and liveable region with a shared sense of belonging and responsibility,” Cr Smith said.

“Working closely with the state government to deliver high-quality infrastructure and opportunities for our growing community is a way we are delivering on that promise.

“We are pleased the State Government have come to the table and delivered such significant funding for major projects that will help create a vibrant and sustainable Central Coast.

“Council has a limited budget, that is why securing funding opportunities is a priority for us and will continue to be.”

Deputy Premier and Minister for Regional NSW John Barilaro said the roll out of the second round of projects takes Stronger Country Communities funding to $300 million.

“I congratulate Central Coast Council and look forward to the local sports and community facility improvements that will make the region an even more attractive place to work and raise a family,” Mr Barilaro said.

Source: https://www.lakesmail.com.au/story/5641490/shared-pathway-and-cultural-hub-part-of-5m-spend/?cs=750

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Most people have a general understanding of how to prepare for an interview. Yet, it can be easy to overlook some of the details, especially if you’re feeling a bit nervous or you’re focusing on preparing for common interview questions.

To help take some of the stress out of your prep, here’s a handy guide to your interview preparation.

1) Mental preparation
Background research: The first step in your preparation is to gain a detailed understanding of the role and the organisation. Pore over the job description so you understand everything that’s involved and gain an understanding of the team you’ll be working with. Research the organisation using all the sources of information at your disposal: the company website; press releases and annual reports; news and other media; social media and LinkedIn; friends and contacts.

Learn about the organisation’s products and services, areas of growth, financial performance, its history, management team, company culture, and its place in the industry. This information will help you understand how you would fit and add value. Also check the LinkedIn profile of the person interviewing you so you understand their role and where they fit into the organisation.

Self-reflection: Now that you’ve gathered information about the organisation, it’s time to reflect on you – your experiences, the skills you’ve developed, your professional achievements and goals. Go through your resume to refresh your memory on the details of your work history.

Think about the specific points you need to be prepared to articulate: your career ‘story’, personal brand and USP, your key capabilities and achievements, what interests you about the role, how you can help the organisation achieve its goals, and why you are attracted to the company and want to work there.

Prepare for common interview questions and behavioural interview questions, and jot down key points. As much as possible, use the terminology used in the job description to describe your competencies and experiences. Also prepare your own questions to ask in the interview.

The most important thing to emphasise in the interview is the fit: between your capabilities and the requirements of the role; between your career goals and what the organisation is offering; and between your personality traits and the culture in the team or organisation.

2) Logistics
Practical details: Sorting out the practical details involved in getting to an interview is just as important as mental preparation, and helps you remain calm on the day. This includes planning what you will wear to the interview and what you will bring to the interview (printout of your CV, notepad and pen, examples of your work). Check the weather – is it likely to rain so will you need to bring an umbrella?

Getting to the interview: If there’s one golden rule about interviews, it’s that you must arrive on time. That means ensuring you know exactly where to go and how to get there, and who to see on your arrival. Make sure you have the interviewer’s full name and its correct pronunciation, and their title.

If you’re taking public transport, check schedules and estimated travel times and give yourself a generous buffer in case of delays. If you’re driving, check the route on Google Maps. If possible, do a test run before the interview and keep your eye out for one-way roads and roadworks. Do you have enough petrol in the car? Always allow more time to get to the interview than you think you’ll need, especially if you’re travelling in peak hour or if rain is expected.

Physical preparation: To perform at your best in the interview, it’s crucial to get a good night’s sleep the night before. Eat a nutritious evening meal (not too heavy or late), avoid alcohol and start winding down before you go to bed. Get an early night and of course, don’t forget to set your alarm.

3) On the day of your job interview
Before leaving: Give yourself time in the morning to review your resume and notes, and run through specific points you wish to make. Ensure you leave early enough to arrive at the interview a few minutes ahead of time.

Final tips: While a morning coffee can help make you more alert, it might be wise to avoid having too many as you don’t want to be jittery during the interview. When you arrive at the interview, give yourself a final once-over: tidy yourself up (check your face, clothes and hair), turn your mobile phone to silent, and take a few deep breaths. When you meet the interviewer, greet them by name and don’t forget to smile!

Source:https://au.hudson.com/career-advice/how-to-prepare-for-a-job-interview

eyeball magnifier

Recruiters spend all of six seconds looking at a resume.

So you only get a brief chance to grab their attention.

The nature of the process means that hiring managers are looking for faults rather than seeking the skills to match the role on offer. A case of looking for weaknessess before strengths.

One key is to make sure achievements in a resume are backed up by metrics. If a project you were involved in was successful, say why it was with numbers.

“Resumes are vital to most job searches, but creating one can quite often be a long and tedious process,” says Ciaran Martin, Talent Acquisition Manager at Open Colleges.

“With so many conflicting pieces of advice, many people feel like they don’t know where to begin.”

Open Colleges, an Australia online education provider, has created a guide to building a career-boosting profile.

1. Pay attention to detail

Be consistent and make sure you spellcheck.

2. Write a cover letter

This shows your interest in the position and, just like with your resume, make sure it is tailored to the role.

3. Lead with a summary or person profile

But make sure it’s only about 10 lines in length.

“This should act as a snapshot to your whole CV,” says Martin. “Use this space wisely as it’s an opportunity to outline your key experience.”

4. Keep the layout simple

Adopt a standard format for each job role you’re discussing, highlighting responsibilities and achievements.

5. Avoid personal details

Only name, email and mobile number. No photographs. “Recruiters try and rule you out before they meet you,” she says. “For example, including your home address might lead to you being disregarded if you live far away from the place of work.”

6. Be careful with the font

Traditional is best, such as Arial or Times New Roman. The font size should be between 10 and 12.

7. Read the job advert

“Make sure you know what you’re applying for,” says Martin. “Tailor your resume so that your responsibilities and achievements are inline with the job spec. If the job was for a more creative/technical position, it would be helpful if those skills were demonstrated.”

8. Highlight key achievements in previous roles

“Ideally achievements that relate to the job you’re applying for, demonstrating your ability to perform well in this next opportunity,” says Martin. “Outline projects you’ve successfully completed – reflects on other skills such as time management, relationship building.”

9. Simple is best

“If you’re applying for a role such as a Graphic Designer, the layout of your resume will be important,” says Martin. “But as a general rule, the most easy to read and accessible is best. If it’s a creative resume, there must also be a link to a portfolio.”

10. Keep it private

“Don’t put your resume up online for everyone to see, plus always PDF,” she says. “Don’t send through a word version which could be edited.”

 

Source: https://www.businessinsider.com.au/10-tips-for-resumes-to-get-a-recruiters-attention-2018-8

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Over 50 executives, business owners and their staff, swapped their beds for sleeping bags on Friday, August 10, as part of Coast Shelter’s Million Star Executive Sleepout.

Held at Glenworth Valley Outdoor Adventure Park, the sleepout is an annual event which coincides with national Homelessness Week (August 6-12). “It is a really positive event that brings in a lot of funds to Coast Shelter each year,” said Coast Shelter’s, Rachel Willis. Over $57,000 in funds was raised, with each sleeper raising $1,000 dollars each. According to Willis, the money raised will be going towards the Community Centre and its kitchen, Laurie’s Table, which provides free meals for the homeless. “The funds raised from the event will be able to provide 50,000 of these meals,” said Willis.

The sleepout involved activities such as team building exercises and a panel discussion about homelessness. Former MasterChef winner, Julie Goodwin, also made her annual visit to cook for the event. “There were client stories from young people who had received services from Coast Shelter, and Star FM sent out some performers for entertainment, which was also great,” said Willis. “Overall, it was a really good turnout with lots of people involved,” she said. Among those sleeping rough as part of the fundraiser, was Central Coast Council CEO, Gary Murphy, and his team, as well as the Federal Member for Dobell, Emma McBride. McBride said it was no secret that homelessness had become a huge concern on the Central Coast.

“We have pockets in our community, around Wyong and Gosford, where homelessness is twice the state average. “This is something that demands our urgent attention. “Our young people are particularly vulnerable,” she said. The 2016 Census showed that there were 1,000 people who were homeless on the Coast. This shows that the number of homeless people has increased by a third since 2011. This is the eighth year that Coast Shelter has successfully held the sleep out, and the shelter will continue to assist this growing homeless community through such initiatives.

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2018/08/sleepout-raised-57000-for-coast-shelter/

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Searching for a job can be a job in itself and is not truly finished until you are offered employment. Entrepreneur Network partner Brian Tracy offers a few tips on how to stay motivated during this often trying time:

1. Clarify your values: If the company’s values are in opposition to your personal value, the employment is inherently set up not to work. This determination of values can be done by being honest with yourself and doing a self-appraisal of what you believe in.

2. Write out your marketable skills and areas of execellence: When you are switching jobs or looking for a more challenging opportunity, be sure to emphasize your strengths. Emphasize how your skills have resulted in measurable consequences in the past. Moreover, certain areas of specialty can serve to add flavor and interest to your candidacy for a job.

3. Pinpoint your areas of weaknesses and determine how you can improve them: Try to avoid fluffier answers like, “I am a perfectionist.” Be honest with areas in which you are not the strongest and think actively about how you can make yourself better.

4. Don’t let the world decide your path for you; choose something you love: Tracy brings up the point that you will spend more time in your life working than any activity other than sleeping. Make sure it’s something you can not only tolerate but find purpose in doing.

Source: https://www.entrepreneur.com/video/312868

Usain

Wearing tracksuit pants with a long sleeve top and gloves, Usain Bolt appeared cooler than normal at his first training run with the Central Coast Mariners.

“The first day of training is always the roughest one,” admitted Bolt after his debut training session with the Mariners in Gosford.

The eight-time Olympic gold medallist and 11-time world champion is the personification of speed and power.

But he will now be assessed on technique, dribbling skills, passing accuracy, endurance and coordination.

“For me I am just trying to get over the first hurdle and that is to get a contract and to get fit,” confessed Bolt.

“I have to work on the basics skills.”

His first modified run lasted less than an hour — some run throughs, a few kicking drills and plenty of time watching on as his potential teammates went about a more intensive hit-out.

At times, the world’s fastest man looked slow on his feet and appeared out of place amongst the company of professional footballers.

“The glare was on him,” Mariners coach Mike Mulvey said.

“He wouldn’t be human if he didn’t have a bit of nerves.”

But it is worth remembering this was day one, where every intention was to ease Bolt into his highly publicised trial.

Is he the real deal? Does he have the skills? Is he really trialling for the A-League’s reigning wooden spooners on the day of his 32nd birthday?

“It’s something I want,” Bolt said.

The Jamaican will base himself on New South Wales’ Central Coast indefinitely, as he embarks on his newest sporting profession.

And the world, or at least the global media, is watching.

The standard turn-out for a Mariners training session is often counted on one hand.

Not this time: 100 journalists, camera operators and photographers applied to cover Bolt’s historic first session.

“We got offers from teams in Spain, France [but] it wasn’t the top division,” Bolt explained.

Bolt wants to play top-tier football and he has chosen the A-League.

It is a completely new playing field. From the mostly individual world of athletics, Bolt now must become a dependable, team player.

“His movement’s not of a professional player’s standard at the moment but, obviously, there’s plenty to work with,” observed Ray Gatt, The Australian’s chief football writer.

“I’m sure we’ll see improvement in him.”

Bolt determined to silence the doubters
While work needs to be done in walking the walk, Bolt is talking the talk.

When he landed in Australia last weekend ahead of his much-publicised trial, Bolt said all the right things: this is no gimmick; he’s here for the long haul; he wants to be an A-League soccer player.

Today was no different.

“I’m here, I don’t care what people say,” he said.

Whilst fitness is his current priority, the four-time Laureus World Sportsman of the Year is confident he has what it takes to become a professional footballer.

“My ability to understand very quickly and to learn the game is something that I am very good at,” Bolt said.

And time is on his side. The Mariners have said they would not be rushed into a decision on Bolt’s playing future.

“If it takes 12 months … I am happy for him to be here,” Mulvey said.

“This guy is a winner.”

The club hopes his winning athletics pedigree — and his “great mental capacity” — will leave a lasting impression on the younger players, regardless of whether he secures a playing contract.

“He’s one of the lads; he doesn’t get any special treatment,” Mulvey said.

“That’s not the way a team works.”

Del Piero, Yorke, Fowler, Heskey, Kewell and Cahill have all played their part in the A-League as a marquee player and now Bolt wants to strike his name as the competition’s next main man.

“I think I see the game very well,” Bolt said.

But, for now, even one of the world’s greatest athletes is just an everyday hopeful.

And perhaps for the first time in his career, Bolt knows what it is like be on a level playing field, something his athletics rivals rarely got to experience.

 

Source: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-08-21/usain-bolt-determined-to-make-mark-with-mariners/10149138

Resume1

Estimates suggest that prospective employers will spend between 10 seconds and two minutes looking at your resume before deciding whether or not they want to interview you. Make sure your resume grabs their attention and demands a second look. Suggestions include:

  • If possible, tailor your resume to fit the particular job.
  • Remember that a resume is only a summary, not a full-blown account of your every career move. Keep it brief – three pages is more than enough detail.
  • Include basic information (such as full name, address, telephone number and other contact details) on the top of the first page.
  • Next, list your educational qualifications, starting from the most recent and working backwards.
  • Then, list your employment history, once again starting from the most recent. Include position, company and length of employment.
  • For each previous job, only list pertinent and interesting details. Don’t just retype your job description – write about your accomplishments.
  • Include specific information if you can. Use numbers and figures. For example, instead of saying ‘raised funds for projects’, put ‘raised over $100,000 per annum’; rather than ‘supervisory position’, write ‘supervision of 25 people’.
  • Explain any gaps in employment history, if you have them. For example, you may have taken time off to travel or further your education.
  • Consider including a summary paragraph of your work skills.
  • Include any other skills that may be relevant such as first aid training, a forklift licence or typing ability.
  • Include industry awards.
  • Include references or contact details for referees.
  • Avoid using gags or novelty tactics to flag attention to your resume. Always type your resume on white A4 paper, and don’t include little gifts or send your resume in unusual packaging. These tactics are just annoying.
  • Attach a short, to-the-point and professional cover letter. Include a summary paragraph to sell your experience and qualifications.

Source: https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/healthyliving/job-hunting-tips

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Woolworths had previously indicated that their next priority, following the opening of their Wadalba store, will be the long-awaited project at the proposed Warnervale Town Centre site. The Town Centre site is also currently seeing the construction of planned housing developments and a park being built by Council. The pace of infrastructure development in the area has picked up in the last year, with a long-awaited new ambulance station being built at Hamlyn Terrace, along with a new private Hospital being built at Kanwal. This is being further complemented by the beginning of the $200m upgrade of Wyong Hospital, representing a huge investment in health infrastructure in the area.

Work has also begun on the new Bunnings development at Lakehaven and a series of industrial and commercial developments ongoing at North Wyong, marking a good sign in the battle against the Central Coast’s 18.1 per cent youth unemployment rate.

David Harris said he welcomed the investment and development in the area and committed to continuing to fight for further funding for local road upgrades and infrastructure needs. “After years of what seemed like a lack of interest from Government and the private sector in our area, we are seeing vital community infrastructure being delivered in and around the Greater Warnervale Area,” he said. “These investments will be a significant boost for jobs in our local area and mean residents have access to better services, closer to home. “I look forward to Woolworths hopefully following through and prioritising its long-awaited development at the Town Centre site. “In 2016, we were facing the imminent privatisation of Wyong Hospital and not much in the way of local service development. “We have fought hard to get where we are and it’s great to see the progress.”

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2018/08/harris-welcomes-new-investment/

Unemployment Workers. Unemployed office workers holding cardboard signs job hunting

Your resume impressed a potential employer, and now you have an interview. Suggestions include:

  • Research the company or organisation. Be familiar with its products and goals.
  • Think about what you want to say in the interview. Imagine the kind of questions you might be asked, and rehearse a few answers.
  • Prepare questions of your own. For example, you could ask them to tell you about the working environment.
  • Dress conservatively and in a business-like fashion.
  • Make sure your personal grooming (such as fingernails and hair) is up to scratch.
  • Arrive on time.
  • Try to be polite, positive and friendly to everyone you meet during the job interview.
  • Don’t use slang or swear words.
  • Display positive body language – such as good posture, firm handshake, relaxed smile and make eye contact – these can make a great first impression.
  • Don’t say anything negative about previous employers.
  • Let the interviewer take the lead. Don’t try to control the conversation.
  • Avoid talking about salary and employee benefits too early.

Source: https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/healthyliving/job-hunting-tips

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Lake Haven Shopping Centre have thanked their customers and retailers who helped raise $44,000 for Beacon Foundation, as part of their first ever Light the Way campaign.

“We launched Light the Way to support young people living in our communities, and the money raised is going to see an additional 330 students complete Beacon’s career pathway programs,” Mike Cochrane, Centre Manager at Lake Haven Centre said. “Beacon Foundation motivates young people for a successful postsecondary school career. “Their programs help equip students with the skills and confidence required to make the transition from school to work, and reduce the rate of youth unemployment,” Mike Cochrane said. “We are grateful to the many people who donated and gave up their time to make Light the Way such a success, and we look forward to continuing the campaign next year,” he added. Scott Harris, Chief Executive Officer of the Beacon Foundation, said: “I would like to congratulate and thank Lake Haven Centre on the inaugural Light the Way initiative. “Visiting local centres and hearing stories from around the country, it was clear that the Vicinity team was passionate about supporting Australian youth to be the best they can be.”

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2018/08/lake-haven-shopping-centre-raises-44000/

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The Nexus Smart Hub, Wyong’s next-generation workspace, now houses its own dedicated Wyong Regional Chronicle pocket office and is also home to an array of other businesses and telecommuters working side by side.

At its core, Nexus has always been about creating a collaborative community for the betterment of business and professional practice in the region. The Nexus represents the pinnacle of networking business culture and provides savvy entrepreneurs and motivated self-starters all the tools to grow their businesses by connecting them with creatives, innovators, specialists and other entrepreneurs.

“No matter what industry you’re in, networking can supercharge your business’ success,” said Nexus Smart Hub Manager, Ms Sonia Pansare. “Networking boosts your credibility and authority, lets you access advice and knowledge from a wide range of sources, and opens up new business opportunities,” she added. Ms Pansare encourages all entrepreneurs on the Coast to explore what the Nexus Smart Hub could do for them. “In a shared office space, you never know who you’ll bump into, so take advantage of that opportunity,” Ms Pansare said.

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2018/07/entrepreneurs-encouraged-to-nexus-hub/

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A job title is a nicely packaged label, but we’re more than just a title.

Your background and experiences provide a wide array of knowledge, skills, and strengths that you can transfer over to any job.

 

Instead of searching by title, I’d start by researching the responsibilities that excite and energize you. That means instead of confining yourself to a job title, start describing what’s involved with your ideal role instead.

Here’s How to Do That

I recommend starting with an exercise that resembles digging for career gold, where you’ll evaluate all of the positions you have held throughout your career and ask yourself things like:

  • What did I love about this job?
  • When did I lose track of time?
  • When was I most excited?

As you go through this process, jot down all of the responsibilities you enjoyed and skills you liked using.

Next, I want you to take a look at this list and start identifying common threads and patterns. Were you happiest when crunching data? Interacting with clients? Problem solving in a team? Building something from nothing? Working on one long-term project vs. multiple short ones?

As you start to understand your skills and interests, you can lead your job search by sharing the story of what you’re looking for. Each time you share your dream role including the skills and interests you align with, two things will happen:

You’ll open up closed doors as more people hear you stating what you’re looking for. It’s amazing what connections and opportunities crop up once we share our goals with the world.

You’ll hear recommendations from people that often sound like, “Have you ever considered [blank]?” or “Have you talked to [blank]?” Whether you’re talking to career experts, recruiters, friends, or strangers, everyone in the world has unique perspectives, contacts, and experiences that they are able to share with you in turn.

Once you figure out what types of roles really intrigue you, then you can craft your personal brand and ensure you’re highlighting a cohesive and consistent story in all of your online and offline marketing materials.

More importantly, you can start a targeted networking campaign to spark conversations with people who will be able to share more about the career paths you’re truly interested in. These informational interviews can lead into informal job interviews… which can lead to offers.

It’s easy to feel welded to your title in your job search, but that doesn’t need to be the case. Turn your attention to your skills and experiences instead, and I’m confident that you’ll find job opportunities that are way better suited to what you’re looking for. Good luck!

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/how-to-job-search-with-vague-job-title

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There is certainly a time and a place for a resume overhaul. Taking a couple hours to really clean up your resume is worth doing before you start a job search, or even just once a year as a tune-up.

But sometimes, you don’t have that kind of time. Sometimes, you just have a few minutes, and you want to spend them giving your resume a quick polishing-up. And for those times, we made you this list of resume updates that only take a few minutes, but that can make a big difference in making your resume shine.

Choose how much time you have, pick a (mini) project, and get ready for your resume to be that much more eye-catching.

 

1. Switch the Font

Ready, switch the font of your resume to Helvetica, Arial, or Times New Roman—in other words, make sure it’s not hard to read (or stuck in Word’s standard Calibri). Using a common, clean font may not make your resume the prettiest out there, but it will make it more readable (and less likely to be rejected by applicant tracking systems).

2. Remove “References Available Upon Request”

If they want references, they’ll ask for them!), and use the extra space to add a detail about your abilities or accomplishments.

3. Delete the Resume Objective

That boring boilerplate “I am a hard working professional who wants to work in [blank] industry” is a bit obvious—why else would you be submitting your resume?—and takes up valuable space.

4. Spell Check

…and correct any mistakes.

5. Save it Correctly

Save your resume as a PDF if it’s in any other format. That way, the formatting won’t get messed up when your resume is opened on a different computer. (To see exceptions to this rule, click here.)

6. Change the File Name

Change the file name from “Resume” to “[First Name] [Last Name] Resume”—it makes things easier for hiring managers and ensures your resume doesn’t get lost in the crowd.

7. Remove Your Address.

If you’re not local, recruiters might not look any further. If you are, recruiters may take your commute time into account and turn you down if they think it would be too long.

8. Add Your LinkedIn Profile

In its place, add a link to your LinkedIn profile, as well as any other relevant social media handles (Twitter if it’s professional, Instagram or Flickr if you’re applying to social media or creative positions). Caveat: Never include Facebook, no matter how clean you keep it.

Don’t want to drop your whole ugly LinkedIn URL onto your resume? (Hint: You shouldn’t.) Create a custom URL to your public profile using simply /yourname (or some similar, simple variation if somebody already has your name). LinkedIn has instructions on its website.

9. Make All Your Hyperlinks Live

Your resume is most likely going to be read on a computer, so making things like your email address, LinkedIn and other social profiles, and personal websites clickable makes it easier for the recruiter to learn more about you.

10. Delete Irrelevant Data

Omit any references to your birthdate, marital status, or religion. Since it’s illegal for employers to consider this when looking at your application (at least in the U.S.), they can’t request it (and offering it makes you look a little clueless).

11. Get Rid of That Grad Year

If you’re more than three years out of college, remove your graduation year. Recruiters only really want to know that you got a degree, and you don’t want them to inadvertently discriminate based on your age.

12. Move Your Education

While you’re at it, do a little rearranging, and move education down below your experience. Unless you’re a recent graduate, chances are your last one or two jobs are more important and relevant to you getting the job.

13. Make it Readable

To improve readability, increase the line spacing (also called leading) to at least 120% of the font size. To do this in Word, go to Format and select Paragraph. In the pulldown under Line Spacing, choose Exactly and set the spacing to two points above the size of your font (so, 12 if your font is 10 point).

14. Reduce Your Margins

Need a little more space to work with? Reduce your top and bottom margins to 0.5″ and your side margins to no less than 0.75″. This will keep your resume clean and readable but give you more room to talk about what you’ve got.

15. Leave High School Behind

Remove anything high school-related unless you’re a year out of college or need to bulk up your resume and did something highly relevant (and awesome) during your high school years.

16. Update Your Skills Section

Add any new skills you’ve gained, and remove anything that is a little dated (nobody wants to hear that you have Microsoft Word experience anymore—they expect it).

17. Break Up Your Skills Section

If you have lots of skills related to a position—say, foreign language, software, and leadership skills—try breaking out one of those sections and listing it on its own (“Language Skills” or “Software Skills”).

18. Double-Check Formatting

Make sure formatting is consistent across your resume. You want all headers to be in the same style, all indentations to line up, all bullet points to match, and the like. You don’t want the styling to look sloppy!

19. Remove Acronyms

Find any acronyms, and write out the full name of the title, certification, or organization. You should include both, at least the first time, to make sure the recruiter knows what you’re talking about and so an applicant tracking system will pick it up no matter which format it is looking for. For example: Certified Public Accountant (CPA).

20. Get Rid of Distracting Design

Unless you are a designer or are submitting a (carefully crafted) creative resume, remove any photos or visual elements. On a more traditional resume, they generally just distract from the information at hand (and can confuse applicant tracking systems).

21. Work Around Your Gaps

If you have gaps of a few months in your work history, swap out the usual start and end dates for each position with years only (e.g., 2010-2012).

22. Do a Verb Swap

Swap out a couple of your boring verbs for some more powerful (and interesting) ones. Check out our list if you need inspiration.

23. Now, Do an Adjective Swap

Swap out a couple of generic adjectives or titles (words like “detail-oriented” or “experienced” are overused and don’t tell a recruiter much) with stronger language that better describes your more unique strengths.

24. List Your Promotions Correctly

Worked multiple jobs within the same organization? Learn how to list them right on your resume, then update it as such.

25. Leave History in the Past

As a rule, you should only show the most recent 10 to 15 years of your career history and only include the experience relevant to the positions to which you are applying. So if you have anything really dated or random, remove it and use the space to bulk up other sections or add something more relevant.

26. Look for Orphan Words

Go through line by line and take note of any orphan words (single words left on a line by themselves). See how you can edit the previous line so they can fit—making your resume look cleaner and opening up extra lines for you to do other things with.

27. Make it Skimmable

Make your document easier to skim by adding divider lines between sections. Check out section three of this great guide for instructions.

28. Use Numerals

Include any numbers on your resume? Go through and change them all to numerical form, instead of written out (i.e., 30% instead of thirty percent). Even small numbers that are often spelled out should be written numerically—it makes them pop to the reviewer and saves space.

29. Read it Out Loud.

This will not only help you catch any spelling or grammar errors, but it will also help you notice any sentences that sound awkward or that are hard to understand.

30. Check Out the Top

Look at your resume “above the fold.” In other words, take a close look at the top third of your resume—the part that will show up on the screen when the hiring manager clicks “open” on that PDF. That’s what’s going to make your first impression—so make sure it serves as a hook that makes the hiring manager eager to read more.

31. Shorten Your Bullet Points

Make sure you have no more than six to seven bullet points for any given position. If you do? Cut and condense. No matter how long you’ve been in a job or how good your bullets are, the recruiter just isn’t going to get through them.

32. Identify Your Narrative

Give your resume to someone who doesn’t know you well to look at for 30 seconds. Then ask: What are the three most memorable things? What’s the narrative? Take this feedback and think about how you can adjust your resume to get it closer to where you want.

33. Use a Word Cloud

Similarly, drop your resume into a word cloud generator and see which keywords are popping out. If the most prominent ones aren’t what you want to be remembered by, or if there are important words that aren’t present, think about how you can tweak your resume to make that more clear.

34. Quantify Everything

Go through your bullet points, and add as many numbers and percentages as you can to quantify your work. How many people were impacted? By what percentage did you exceed your goals? (And, yes, it’s OK to estimate as long as you can roughly prove it.)

35. Make Your Benefit Clear

Pick a few statements to take one step further, and add in what the benefit was to your boss or your company. By doing this, you clearly communicate not only what you’re capable of, but also the direct benefit the employer will receive by hiring you.

36. Consider Adding a Qualifications Section

Perhaps in lieu of your now-deleted “Career Objective?” This should be a six-sentence (or bullet pointed) section that concisely presents the crème of the crop of your achievements, major skills, and important experiences. By doing this, you’re both appeasing any applicant tracking systems with keywords and giving the hiring manager the juicy, important bits right at the top.

37. Update Your Header to Make it Pop

You don’t have to have a ton of design knowledge to make a header that looks sleek and catches a recruiter’s eye. (Hint: Use this same header on your resume and cover letter to make your “personal brand” look really put together.)

38. Fill it Up

Need to fill up more space on your resume, or feel like you’re light on the experience? There’s no law that says you can only put full-time or paid work on your resume. So, if you’ve participated in a major volunteer role, worked part-time, freelanced, or blogged? Add a couple of these things as their own “jobs” within your career chronology.

39. Or, Cut it Down

If you need more space on your resume, check and see if any of your formatting decisions are taking up unnecessary space. Does your header take up too much at the top? Do you have any extra line breaks that you don’t really need? Tinker around with the formatting and see how much space you can open up (without your resume looking crowded or messy).

40. Make Your Bullet Points Make Sense

Look at each bullet point and make sure it’s understandable to the average person. Remember that the first person who sees your resume might be a recruiter, an assistant, or even a high-level executive—and you want to be sure that it is readable, relevant, and interesting to all of them.

41. Use a Resume Template

So you’ll look extra polished.

42. Update All Your Roles

Make sure all of the experience on your resume is updated. Add any awards you’ve received, new skills you’ve taken on, articles you’ve published, or anything else awesome you’ve done.

43. Spread the Word

Hop over to your LinkedIn profile, and make any updates you’ve just made to your resume to your summary and experience sections there.

44. Ask a Friend to Help

Email three of your friends or professional contacts asking (nicely!) for a peek at their resumes. You might be able to get some inspiration for your own (or even help them out).

45. Get That Baby Out There

Find an awesome job to apply to with one of our partner companies, then get started on your cover letter with our easy-to-follow guide.

 

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/45-quick-changes-that-help-your-resume-get-noticed?ref=long-reads-0

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Central Coast Council will be able to start work on crucial new projects, following an early cash injection of almost $13m, under the Financial Assistance Grants program from the Federal Government.
Member for Robertson, Lucy Wicks, said the Federal Government has made an early payment of 50 per cent of the 2018-19 Financial Assistance Grants funding to Central Coast Council, to help support the delivery of essential services and local infrastructure.
“Central Coast Council has already received this early instalment, with an estimated total of $26m to be received by Council through these grants for the 2018-19 financial year,” Lucy Wicks said.
“The Council can spend this estimated $26m in the way they think will serve the Central Coast best,” she said.
“This means that this untied funding can go towards priority projects for the Central Coast community, like up to 1,000 new car spots that could be built by Council at Gosford.
“If Central Coast Council sees Labor’s $15m car parking promise as a priority project for the Coast, they have at their disposal approximately $26m already being delivered by the Federal Government.
“This Federal funding for Central Coast Council’s local priority projects is real money, which is fully funded and will be delivered in full by the end of this financial year.”
Minister for Regional Development, Territories and Local Government, Dr John McVeigh, said the Government’s decision to make an early payment of 50 per cent of 2018-19 Financial Assistance Grants to all 546 councils across Australia, would help fast track delivery of priority local projects.
“The Coalition Government recognises the importance of giving councils the power to determine local priorities in their region,” he said.
“These grants are therefore an extremely important means of allowing local governments to invest substantial allocations of federal funds based on local needs.
“The Coalition Government also supports local councils through a range of other targeted funding programs including Roads to Recovery, Bridges to Renewal, the Building Better Regions Fund, and Regional Growth Fund.”
Council issued a statement in response to Lucy Wicks’ announcement.
“Council has planned for this regular funding from the Federal Government’s Financial Assistance Grants within our operating budget for the 2018/19 Delivery Program and Operational Plan,” the Council statement said.
“This funding allows Council to provide services to the community, free of charge, or at a subsidised price, such as play grounds, life guards patrolling our beaches, libraries, sporting facilities, skate parks, parks and reserves,” it said.
“Council’s Operational Plan details delivery of essential services and capital works in the priority areas, which were outlined in the first Community Strategic Plan for the Central Coast.
“The priority areas the community want to see us deliver on are the road network, water and sewer service and infrastructure, protecting and enhancing the local environment, community facilities and open space and recreation.
“We are happy to work with all levels of Government to help make our commuters’ journey from home to work better.
“The 2018/19 operating budget includes an allocation for developing a car parking strategy for the whole of the Coast, because we know that moving around the coast is also important to our residents.”

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2018/07/council-receives-13m-as-an-early-federal-government-grant/

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THE Central Coast property market continues to speed ahead, as new data reveals it is the only Sydney region forecast for positive growth.

According to Moodys Analytics, based on CoreLogic’s Hedonic Home Value Index, the Central Coast is the only area poised to see growth in the residential property market for both 2018 and 2019.

The data also predicts a divergent national market, with declines in the biggest markets of Melbourne and Sydney.

The Coast is categorised in the survey as a region of Greater Sydney, and it’s the only area to avoid a dismal drop in home value forecasts.

The report indicates that by 2019 Central Coast houses will experience an increase in value of 8.5 per cent, with apartments forecast to do even better at 12.4 per cent.

Millionaire developer Tony Denny, who has spearheaded six Central Coast apartment developments over the past couple of years, said he believed there was still a shortage of quality apartments and houses on the Coast.

He is so invested in the area that he has spent almost half a billion dollars building up his portfolio — and he doesn’t see it ending soon.

“I do believe there will be continued growth on the Central Coast because of those factors,” he said.

“But the Central Coast has never really had big highs and lows – it’s been consistent and just appreciates gradually, which is a nice conservative way to experience capital growth.

Source: https://www.news.com.au/finance/real-estate/sydney-nsw/central-coast-the-only-sydney-region-forecasted-for-positive-growth/news-story/7ceb82978640e107947ee35b3f901cf6

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When it comes to a “safe” job versus a “dream” job, it can be hard to turn down the first if there’s no guarantee of the second.

So, the question becomes: If you get an offer that you’re not too excited about, should you take it, or keep looking?

The answer really depends on your situation. There are circumstances in which it makes sense to say “yes:” whether it’s for experience, much-needed cash, or because it’s a stepping stone to a career you do love.

Remember: Not every job needs to be your dream job, but every new position should offer some advantage over your current role.

Here’s your guide to deciding if an only somewhat exciting offer is worth taking.

Yes if: It Will Help You Achieve Big Goals Down the Line
If it’s common practice in your industry to pay your dues with a not-so-great role for a couple of years, then you probably need to accept it for a bit—just make sure it’s part of a larger plan.

No if: You’re Delaying Important Goals by Taking It
If your life’s ambition is to be a designer, and what you’re being offered is a social media manager position (with no chance of changing roles later on), it’s probably in your best interest to turn it down.

Yes if: The Pay Is High Enough That It’ll Solve Other Big Problems in Your Life
If you have a ton of student or credit card debt, are trying to save for a down payment, need to move out of your parents’ house, or have a health problem that needs funding, a high-paying job can take the stress off and make your life easier (until you’re physically and mentally ready to pursue a career you love).

No if: The Pay’s Not a Big Improvement From What You’re Earning Now
Switching jobs should be for career advancement, much more interesting work, or a significant salary bump—not for another boring position at the same pay level.

Yes if: You’re Going to Get Career-Building Experience
Even if the job description sounds dull, if you can get essential experience and learn some valuable skills, it’s worth going for it. Then, after you’ve bulked up your resume, you can start looking for more exciting jobs where you can use your new talents.

No if: It’s a Lateral Move
If it’s a job similar to the one you have or have had, and there’s no potential for gaining valuable experience or skills in your field, take a pass.

Yes if: There’s a Real Opportunity to Move Up
Maybe you’ll be the receptionist now, but the company does interesting design work and is known for hiring internally. Or, there’s an exciting management job that could be yours in a couple of years. Sometimes, you have to do something you don’t want to in order to get what you want—but just make sure there’s a prize worth waiting for.

No if: It’s Truly a Dead End
If the offer comes from a company where the people in your dream job have been around for decades and show no signs of leaving, or you know they’ll never consider you for an internal transfer, decline.

Yes if: You’re Unemployed and Have Been Applying With No Success
A lengthy period of unemployment can raise red flags for potential employers. If the months are going by and no offers are coming in, take it. This allows you to make money as you look and not end up in a far more desperate situation.

No if: You’re Gainfully Employed and Don’t Think This Will Make You Any Happier
There’s no advantage in changing things just for the sake of a change. Keep looking for a role that’ll make a positive difference in your life.

If you decide to accept an offer you’re not excited about, remember two things. First, keep the reason you’re doing it front and center, and remind yourself that you’re here in pursuit of a larger goal. This will help you not feel stuck forever in a career you’re not happy about—and force you to make a change when you’re no longer gaining fulfillment from it.

Second, put in as much effort and enthusiasm as if it were actually your dream job—not only will this help you succeed later on, it will make your work atmosphere a bit more bearable.

 

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/should-i-take-a-job-offer-i’m-not-excited-about?ref=recently-published-2

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Early on in my career as an HR generalist, I realized that my favorite tasks had to do with recruitment and hiring—probably because my personality is more like a salesperson, and recruiting is the “sales” side of HR.

My career fantasies consisted of me getting to just focus on recruiting all day—finding and interviewing people, making offers, and convincing them this was the right opportunity for them. Eventually, I made my dreams happen and never looked back.

But is specialization always the right answer? Here are six questions to ask yourself to help you decide if it is, or if you should go the generalize route:

1. Who Are the People I Really Admire and Enjoy Working With?

Do you get excited when you talk with a specialist about what they do? What about their expertise gets you jazzed?
If you find your curiosity leads you down a rabbit hole of ever more detailed questions for them, then specialization could be a great fit for you. If you run out of questions or feel confused or bored, maybe you’re more of a “skim the surface” kind of person. There’s nothing wrong with that—business needs both kinds!

2. Would I Be Content Spending All Day Focused on One Thing?

If you’re in finance, you can take that in a lot of different directions. For those who like to dip their toes in all areas—from accounts receivable to treasury to budget management—specializing would be a downer.

But if you’ve seen all that and want to plumb the depths of one specific field, it may be just the right decision. Talk to a few people who work in those roles to make sure it’s what you think it is and you’ll enjoy it.

3. Will I Need More Education to Go Deep Into What I Really Want to Focus On?

Accountants and lawyers often face this dilemma early on. Tax accounting and tax law, for example, can be a fast path to high rewards, but they typically require advanced degrees and a lot of exposure to the specialty.

If you make that investment in yourself to go back to school, you’re making a long-term commitment to your craft. So be sure you really love it (and can afford it).

4. Will Specializing Increase or Decrease My Work-Life Balance?

It takes 10,000 hours to become an expert at anything, according to Malcom Gladwell’s book Outliers: The Story of Success.

Are you ready to spend a lot of time working to become a topic expert? How will that affect your relationships with your friends and family? It may be smart to ask for their opinion and support first, and decide for yourself if specializing will take away from the things you value outside of work.

5. Will I Box Myself Out of Future Opportunities if I Become Too Narrowly Focused?

It’s key to figure out if becoming a specialist will ultimately limit your career path down the road. Use your networking efforts to get a sense of where specializing will take you—and whether that sounds interesting to you.

Also, consider whether you feel more comfortable in a large organization or a small one. Small companies typically (but not always!) need more “utility players” willing to play several roles and fill in for others, whereas large enterprises often “divide and conquer,” solving problems with teams of specialists.

6. What’s My End Game?

If, down the road, you want to manage others, you might want to keep one foot in the generalist world. As a boss, you’ll need to be able to have credibility beyond your specialty to lead others.

However, if you’re more excited about becoming an expert in your field, specializing might be the way to go.

You may or may not already know all the right people willing to invest in you and advise you as you decide between specializing and generalizing.

If you don’t, that’s okay—but it’s key to have a strong network when making this decision. Talk with colleagues at your current company who are a few years ahead of you. Or, get in touch with fellow alumni who graduated from your university. Or, consider hiring a career coach who specializes in your industry or desired field.

Just be sure not to rush your decision—and know that you can always change your mind. Read a lot of articles and blogs, take people to coffee, listen to podcasts. In short, take your time. After all, this is your career—it’s worth getting right!

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/questions-ask-yourself-specialize-generalize?ref=recently-published-0

NSW Premier, Ms Gladys Berejiklian, and Health Minister, Mr Brad Hazzard, officially opened Gosford Hospital’s new 11-storey tower on June 23.

“Together with the $200m Wyong Hospital redevelopment, the $348m Gosford Hospital redevelopment is delivering next-generation, first-class health care to the Central Coast,” Ms Berejiklian said. “The technological advancements in the new 11-storey tower block are incredible, including for the first time, a nuclear medicine service which will greatly improve diagnoses for a range of conditions, and speed up scans for emergency patients. “The redevelopment is part of our government’s record $8b health infrastructure spend over the next four years,” Ms Berejiklian said. Mr Hazzard said clinicians and the community contributed to the innovative design.

“The new tower has been designed with patients in mind, with privacy and comfort front and centre,” he said. “The Intensive Care Unit has the largest windows of any public hospital in the state, and a courtyard with oxygen and gas fittings means that some of our sickest patients can be outside,” he added. The new tower features: a Special Care Nursery, with expanded capacity for newborn cots from 10 to 15, and pull-out beds for parents and carers; an Intensive Care Unit with glass screens that can be switched to opaque (instead of curtains); an MRI machine to diagnose stroke, cancer, infection and joint abnormalities; single or double rooms with an ensuite and a patient/relative lounge in each unit; and, dedicated staff and patient lifts to offer more privacy. The complete redevelopment, due to be finished by 2019, also includes a new $35.5m carpark and refurbished spaces for allied health, cancer day unit, emergency short stay unit and cardiovascular services.

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2018/07/hospital-new-11-storey-tower-opened/