Unemployment Workers. Unemployed office workers holding cardboard signs job hunting

Your resume impressed a potential employer, and now you have an interview. Suggestions include:

  • Research the company or organisation. Be familiar with its products and goals.
  • Think about what you want to say in the interview. Imagine the kind of questions you might be asked, and rehearse a few answers.
  • Prepare questions of your own. For example, you could ask them to tell you about the working environment.
  • Dress conservatively and in a business-like fashion.
  • Make sure your personal grooming (such as fingernails and hair) is up to scratch.
  • Arrive on time.
  • Try to be polite, positive and friendly to everyone you meet during the job interview.
  • Don’t use slang or swear words.
  • Display positive body language – such as good posture, firm handshake, relaxed smile and make eye contact – these can make a great first impression.
  • Don’t say anything negative about previous employers.
  • Let the interviewer take the lead. Don’t try to control the conversation.
  • Avoid talking about salary and employee benefits too early.

Source: https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/healthyliving/job-hunting-tips

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Lake Haven Shopping Centre have thanked their customers and retailers who helped raise $44,000 for Beacon Foundation, as part of their first ever Light the Way campaign.

“We launched Light the Way to support young people living in our communities, and the money raised is going to see an additional 330 students complete Beacon’s career pathway programs,” Mike Cochrane, Centre Manager at Lake Haven Centre said. “Beacon Foundation motivates young people for a successful postsecondary school career. “Their programs help equip students with the skills and confidence required to make the transition from school to work, and reduce the rate of youth unemployment,” Mike Cochrane said. “We are grateful to the many people who donated and gave up their time to make Light the Way such a success, and we look forward to continuing the campaign next year,” he added. Scott Harris, Chief Executive Officer of the Beacon Foundation, said: “I would like to congratulate and thank Lake Haven Centre on the inaugural Light the Way initiative. “Visiting local centres and hearing stories from around the country, it was clear that the Vicinity team was passionate about supporting Australian youth to be the best they can be.”

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2018/08/lake-haven-shopping-centre-raises-44000/

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The Nexus Smart Hub, Wyong’s next-generation workspace, now houses its own dedicated Wyong Regional Chronicle pocket office and is also home to an array of other businesses and telecommuters working side by side.

At its core, Nexus has always been about creating a collaborative community for the betterment of business and professional practice in the region. The Nexus represents the pinnacle of networking business culture and provides savvy entrepreneurs and motivated self-starters all the tools to grow their businesses by connecting them with creatives, innovators, specialists and other entrepreneurs.

“No matter what industry you’re in, networking can supercharge your business’ success,” said Nexus Smart Hub Manager, Ms Sonia Pansare. “Networking boosts your credibility and authority, lets you access advice and knowledge from a wide range of sources, and opens up new business opportunities,” she added. Ms Pansare encourages all entrepreneurs on the Coast to explore what the Nexus Smart Hub could do for them. “In a shared office space, you never know who you’ll bump into, so take advantage of that opportunity,” Ms Pansare said.

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2018/07/entrepreneurs-encouraged-to-nexus-hub/

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A job title is a nicely packaged label, but we’re more than just a title.

Your background and experiences provide a wide array of knowledge, skills, and strengths that you can transfer over to any job.

 

Instead of searching by title, I’d start by researching the responsibilities that excite and energize you. That means instead of confining yourself to a job title, start describing what’s involved with your ideal role instead.

Here’s How to Do That

I recommend starting with an exercise that resembles digging for career gold, where you’ll evaluate all of the positions you have held throughout your career and ask yourself things like:

  • What did I love about this job?
  • When did I lose track of time?
  • When was I most excited?

As you go through this process, jot down all of the responsibilities you enjoyed and skills you liked using.

Next, I want you to take a look at this list and start identifying common threads and patterns. Were you happiest when crunching data? Interacting with clients? Problem solving in a team? Building something from nothing? Working on one long-term project vs. multiple short ones?

As you start to understand your skills and interests, you can lead your job search by sharing the story of what you’re looking for. Each time you share your dream role including the skills and interests you align with, two things will happen:

You’ll open up closed doors as more people hear you stating what you’re looking for. It’s amazing what connections and opportunities crop up once we share our goals with the world.

You’ll hear recommendations from people that often sound like, “Have you ever considered [blank]?” or “Have you talked to [blank]?” Whether you’re talking to career experts, recruiters, friends, or strangers, everyone in the world has unique perspectives, contacts, and experiences that they are able to share with you in turn.

Once you figure out what types of roles really intrigue you, then you can craft your personal brand and ensure you’re highlighting a cohesive and consistent story in all of your online and offline marketing materials.

More importantly, you can start a targeted networking campaign to spark conversations with people who will be able to share more about the career paths you’re truly interested in. These informational interviews can lead into informal job interviews… which can lead to offers.

It’s easy to feel welded to your title in your job search, but that doesn’t need to be the case. Turn your attention to your skills and experiences instead, and I’m confident that you’ll find job opportunities that are way better suited to what you’re looking for. Good luck!

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/how-to-job-search-with-vague-job-title

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There is certainly a time and a place for a resume overhaul. Taking a couple hours to really clean up your resume is worth doing before you start a job search, or even just once a year as a tune-up.

But sometimes, you don’t have that kind of time. Sometimes, you just have a few minutes, and you want to spend them giving your resume a quick polishing-up. And for those times, we made you this list of resume updates that only take a few minutes, but that can make a big difference in making your resume shine.

Choose how much time you have, pick a (mini) project, and get ready for your resume to be that much more eye-catching.

 

1. Switch the Font

Ready, switch the font of your resume to Helvetica, Arial, or Times New Roman—in other words, make sure it’s not hard to read (or stuck in Word’s standard Calibri). Using a common, clean font may not make your resume the prettiest out there, but it will make it more readable (and less likely to be rejected by applicant tracking systems).

2. Remove “References Available Upon Request”

If they want references, they’ll ask for them!), and use the extra space to add a detail about your abilities or accomplishments.

3. Delete the Resume Objective

That boring boilerplate “I am a hard working professional who wants to work in [blank] industry” is a bit obvious—why else would you be submitting your resume?—and takes up valuable space.

4. Spell Check

…and correct any mistakes.

5. Save it Correctly

Save your resume as a PDF if it’s in any other format. That way, the formatting won’t get messed up when your resume is opened on a different computer. (To see exceptions to this rule, click here.)

6. Change the File Name

Change the file name from “Resume” to “[First Name] [Last Name] Resume”—it makes things easier for hiring managers and ensures your resume doesn’t get lost in the crowd.

7. Remove Your Address.

If you’re not local, recruiters might not look any further. If you are, recruiters may take your commute time into account and turn you down if they think it would be too long.

8. Add Your LinkedIn Profile

In its place, add a link to your LinkedIn profile, as well as any other relevant social media handles (Twitter if it’s professional, Instagram or Flickr if you’re applying to social media or creative positions). Caveat: Never include Facebook, no matter how clean you keep it.

Don’t want to drop your whole ugly LinkedIn URL onto your resume? (Hint: You shouldn’t.) Create a custom URL to your public profile using simply /yourname (or some similar, simple variation if somebody already has your name). LinkedIn has instructions on its website.

9. Make All Your Hyperlinks Live

Your resume is most likely going to be read on a computer, so making things like your email address, LinkedIn and other social profiles, and personal websites clickable makes it easier for the recruiter to learn more about you.

10. Delete Irrelevant Data

Omit any references to your birthdate, marital status, or religion. Since it’s illegal for employers to consider this when looking at your application (at least in the U.S.), they can’t request it (and offering it makes you look a little clueless).

11. Get Rid of That Grad Year

If you’re more than three years out of college, remove your graduation year. Recruiters only really want to know that you got a degree, and you don’t want them to inadvertently discriminate based on your age.

12. Move Your Education

While you’re at it, do a little rearranging, and move education down below your experience. Unless you’re a recent graduate, chances are your last one or two jobs are more important and relevant to you getting the job.

13. Make it Readable

To improve readability, increase the line spacing (also called leading) to at least 120% of the font size. To do this in Word, go to Format and select Paragraph. In the pulldown under Line Spacing, choose Exactly and set the spacing to two points above the size of your font (so, 12 if your font is 10 point).

14. Reduce Your Margins

Need a little more space to work with? Reduce your top and bottom margins to 0.5″ and your side margins to no less than 0.75″. This will keep your resume clean and readable but give you more room to talk about what you’ve got.

15. Leave High School Behind

Remove anything high school-related unless you’re a year out of college or need to bulk up your resume and did something highly relevant (and awesome) during your high school years.

16. Update Your Skills Section

Add any new skills you’ve gained, and remove anything that is a little dated (nobody wants to hear that you have Microsoft Word experience anymore—they expect it).

17. Break Up Your Skills Section

If you have lots of skills related to a position—say, foreign language, software, and leadership skills—try breaking out one of those sections and listing it on its own (“Language Skills” or “Software Skills”).

18. Double-Check Formatting

Make sure formatting is consistent across your resume. You want all headers to be in the same style, all indentations to line up, all bullet points to match, and the like. You don’t want the styling to look sloppy!

19. Remove Acronyms

Find any acronyms, and write out the full name of the title, certification, or organization. You should include both, at least the first time, to make sure the recruiter knows what you’re talking about and so an applicant tracking system will pick it up no matter which format it is looking for. For example: Certified Public Accountant (CPA).

20. Get Rid of Distracting Design

Unless you are a designer or are submitting a (carefully crafted) creative resume, remove any photos or visual elements. On a more traditional resume, they generally just distract from the information at hand (and can confuse applicant tracking systems).

21. Work Around Your Gaps

If you have gaps of a few months in your work history, swap out the usual start and end dates for each position with years only (e.g., 2010-2012).

22. Do a Verb Swap

Swap out a couple of your boring verbs for some more powerful (and interesting) ones. Check out our list if you need inspiration.

23. Now, Do an Adjective Swap

Swap out a couple of generic adjectives or titles (words like “detail-oriented” or “experienced” are overused and don’t tell a recruiter much) with stronger language that better describes your more unique strengths.

24. List Your Promotions Correctly

Worked multiple jobs within the same organization? Learn how to list them right on your resume, then update it as such.

25. Leave History in the Past

As a rule, you should only show the most recent 10 to 15 years of your career history and only include the experience relevant to the positions to which you are applying. So if you have anything really dated or random, remove it and use the space to bulk up other sections or add something more relevant.

26. Look for Orphan Words

Go through line by line and take note of any orphan words (single words left on a line by themselves). See how you can edit the previous line so they can fit—making your resume look cleaner and opening up extra lines for you to do other things with.

27. Make it Skimmable

Make your document easier to skim by adding divider lines between sections. Check out section three of this great guide for instructions.

28. Use Numerals

Include any numbers on your resume? Go through and change them all to numerical form, instead of written out (i.e., 30% instead of thirty percent). Even small numbers that are often spelled out should be written numerically—it makes them pop to the reviewer and saves space.

29. Read it Out Loud.

This will not only help you catch any spelling or grammar errors, but it will also help you notice any sentences that sound awkward or that are hard to understand.

30. Check Out the Top

Look at your resume “above the fold.” In other words, take a close look at the top third of your resume—the part that will show up on the screen when the hiring manager clicks “open” on that PDF. That’s what’s going to make your first impression—so make sure it serves as a hook that makes the hiring manager eager to read more.

31. Shorten Your Bullet Points

Make sure you have no more than six to seven bullet points for any given position. If you do? Cut and condense. No matter how long you’ve been in a job or how good your bullets are, the recruiter just isn’t going to get through them.

32. Identify Your Narrative

Give your resume to someone who doesn’t know you well to look at for 30 seconds. Then ask: What are the three most memorable things? What’s the narrative? Take this feedback and think about how you can adjust your resume to get it closer to where you want.

33. Use a Word Cloud

Similarly, drop your resume into a word cloud generator and see which keywords are popping out. If the most prominent ones aren’t what you want to be remembered by, or if there are important words that aren’t present, think about how you can tweak your resume to make that more clear.

34. Quantify Everything

Go through your bullet points, and add as many numbers and percentages as you can to quantify your work. How many people were impacted? By what percentage did you exceed your goals? (And, yes, it’s OK to estimate as long as you can roughly prove it.)

35. Make Your Benefit Clear

Pick a few statements to take one step further, and add in what the benefit was to your boss or your company. By doing this, you clearly communicate not only what you’re capable of, but also the direct benefit the employer will receive by hiring you.

36. Consider Adding a Qualifications Section

Perhaps in lieu of your now-deleted “Career Objective?” This should be a six-sentence (or bullet pointed) section that concisely presents the crème of the crop of your achievements, major skills, and important experiences. By doing this, you’re both appeasing any applicant tracking systems with keywords and giving the hiring manager the juicy, important bits right at the top.

37. Update Your Header to Make it Pop

You don’t have to have a ton of design knowledge to make a header that looks sleek and catches a recruiter’s eye. (Hint: Use this same header on your resume and cover letter to make your “personal brand” look really put together.)

38. Fill it Up

Need to fill up more space on your resume, or feel like you’re light on the experience? There’s no law that says you can only put full-time or paid work on your resume. So, if you’ve participated in a major volunteer role, worked part-time, freelanced, or blogged? Add a couple of these things as their own “jobs” within your career chronology.

39. Or, Cut it Down

If you need more space on your resume, check and see if any of your formatting decisions are taking up unnecessary space. Does your header take up too much at the top? Do you have any extra line breaks that you don’t really need? Tinker around with the formatting and see how much space you can open up (without your resume looking crowded or messy).

40. Make Your Bullet Points Make Sense

Look at each bullet point and make sure it’s understandable to the average person. Remember that the first person who sees your resume might be a recruiter, an assistant, or even a high-level executive—and you want to be sure that it is readable, relevant, and interesting to all of them.

41. Use a Resume Template

So you’ll look extra polished.

42. Update All Your Roles

Make sure all of the experience on your resume is updated. Add any awards you’ve received, new skills you’ve taken on, articles you’ve published, or anything else awesome you’ve done.

43. Spread the Word

Hop over to your LinkedIn profile, and make any updates you’ve just made to your resume to your summary and experience sections there.

44. Ask a Friend to Help

Email three of your friends or professional contacts asking (nicely!) for a peek at their resumes. You might be able to get some inspiration for your own (or even help them out).

45. Get That Baby Out There

Find an awesome job to apply to with one of our partner companies, then get started on your cover letter with our easy-to-follow guide.

 

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/45-quick-changes-that-help-your-resume-get-noticed?ref=long-reads-0

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Central Coast Council will be able to start work on crucial new projects, following an early cash injection of almost $13m, under the Financial Assistance Grants program from the Federal Government.
Member for Robertson, Lucy Wicks, said the Federal Government has made an early payment of 50 per cent of the 2018-19 Financial Assistance Grants funding to Central Coast Council, to help support the delivery of essential services and local infrastructure.
“Central Coast Council has already received this early instalment, with an estimated total of $26m to be received by Council through these grants for the 2018-19 financial year,” Lucy Wicks said.
“The Council can spend this estimated $26m in the way they think will serve the Central Coast best,” she said.
“This means that this untied funding can go towards priority projects for the Central Coast community, like up to 1,000 new car spots that could be built by Council at Gosford.
“If Central Coast Council sees Labor’s $15m car parking promise as a priority project for the Coast, they have at their disposal approximately $26m already being delivered by the Federal Government.
“This Federal funding for Central Coast Council’s local priority projects is real money, which is fully funded and will be delivered in full by the end of this financial year.”
Minister for Regional Development, Territories and Local Government, Dr John McVeigh, said the Government’s decision to make an early payment of 50 per cent of 2018-19 Financial Assistance Grants to all 546 councils across Australia, would help fast track delivery of priority local projects.
“The Coalition Government recognises the importance of giving councils the power to determine local priorities in their region,” he said.
“These grants are therefore an extremely important means of allowing local governments to invest substantial allocations of federal funds based on local needs.
“The Coalition Government also supports local councils through a range of other targeted funding programs including Roads to Recovery, Bridges to Renewal, the Building Better Regions Fund, and Regional Growth Fund.”
Council issued a statement in response to Lucy Wicks’ announcement.
“Council has planned for this regular funding from the Federal Government’s Financial Assistance Grants within our operating budget for the 2018/19 Delivery Program and Operational Plan,” the Council statement said.
“This funding allows Council to provide services to the community, free of charge, or at a subsidised price, such as play grounds, life guards patrolling our beaches, libraries, sporting facilities, skate parks, parks and reserves,” it said.
“Council’s Operational Plan details delivery of essential services and capital works in the priority areas, which were outlined in the first Community Strategic Plan for the Central Coast.
“The priority areas the community want to see us deliver on are the road network, water and sewer service and infrastructure, protecting and enhancing the local environment, community facilities and open space and recreation.
“We are happy to work with all levels of Government to help make our commuters’ journey from home to work better.
“The 2018/19 operating budget includes an allocation for developing a car parking strategy for the whole of the Coast, because we know that moving around the coast is also important to our residents.”

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2018/07/council-receives-13m-as-an-early-federal-government-grant/

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THE Central Coast property market continues to speed ahead, as new data reveals it is the only Sydney region forecast for positive growth.

According to Moodys Analytics, based on CoreLogic’s Hedonic Home Value Index, the Central Coast is the only area poised to see growth in the residential property market for both 2018 and 2019.

The data also predicts a divergent national market, with declines in the biggest markets of Melbourne and Sydney.

The Coast is categorised in the survey as a region of Greater Sydney, and it’s the only area to avoid a dismal drop in home value forecasts.

The report indicates that by 2019 Central Coast houses will experience an increase in value of 8.5 per cent, with apartments forecast to do even better at 12.4 per cent.

Millionaire developer Tony Denny, who has spearheaded six Central Coast apartment developments over the past couple of years, said he believed there was still a shortage of quality apartments and houses on the Coast.

He is so invested in the area that he has spent almost half a billion dollars building up his portfolio — and he doesn’t see it ending soon.

“I do believe there will be continued growth on the Central Coast because of those factors,” he said.

“But the Central Coast has never really had big highs and lows – it’s been consistent and just appreciates gradually, which is a nice conservative way to experience capital growth.

Source: https://www.news.com.au/finance/real-estate/sydney-nsw/central-coast-the-only-sydney-region-forecasted-for-positive-growth/news-story/7ceb82978640e107947ee35b3f901cf6

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When it comes to a “safe” job versus a “dream” job, it can be hard to turn down the first if there’s no guarantee of the second.

So, the question becomes: If you get an offer that you’re not too excited about, should you take it, or keep looking?

The answer really depends on your situation. There are circumstances in which it makes sense to say “yes:” whether it’s for experience, much-needed cash, or because it’s a stepping stone to a career you do love.

Remember: Not every job needs to be your dream job, but every new position should offer some advantage over your current role.

Here’s your guide to deciding if an only somewhat exciting offer is worth taking.

Yes if: It Will Help You Achieve Big Goals Down the Line
If it’s common practice in your industry to pay your dues with a not-so-great role for a couple of years, then you probably need to accept it for a bit—just make sure it’s part of a larger plan.

No if: You’re Delaying Important Goals by Taking It
If your life’s ambition is to be a designer, and what you’re being offered is a social media manager position (with no chance of changing roles later on), it’s probably in your best interest to turn it down.

Yes if: The Pay Is High Enough That It’ll Solve Other Big Problems in Your Life
If you have a ton of student or credit card debt, are trying to save for a down payment, need to move out of your parents’ house, or have a health problem that needs funding, a high-paying job can take the stress off and make your life easier (until you’re physically and mentally ready to pursue a career you love).

No if: The Pay’s Not a Big Improvement From What You’re Earning Now
Switching jobs should be for career advancement, much more interesting work, or a significant salary bump—not for another boring position at the same pay level.

Yes if: You’re Going to Get Career-Building Experience
Even if the job description sounds dull, if you can get essential experience and learn some valuable skills, it’s worth going for it. Then, after you’ve bulked up your resume, you can start looking for more exciting jobs where you can use your new talents.

No if: It’s a Lateral Move
If it’s a job similar to the one you have or have had, and there’s no potential for gaining valuable experience or skills in your field, take a pass.

Yes if: There’s a Real Opportunity to Move Up
Maybe you’ll be the receptionist now, but the company does interesting design work and is known for hiring internally. Or, there’s an exciting management job that could be yours in a couple of years. Sometimes, you have to do something you don’t want to in order to get what you want—but just make sure there’s a prize worth waiting for.

No if: It’s Truly a Dead End
If the offer comes from a company where the people in your dream job have been around for decades and show no signs of leaving, or you know they’ll never consider you for an internal transfer, decline.

Yes if: You’re Unemployed and Have Been Applying With No Success
A lengthy period of unemployment can raise red flags for potential employers. If the months are going by and no offers are coming in, take it. This allows you to make money as you look and not end up in a far more desperate situation.

No if: You’re Gainfully Employed and Don’t Think This Will Make You Any Happier
There’s no advantage in changing things just for the sake of a change. Keep looking for a role that’ll make a positive difference in your life.

If you decide to accept an offer you’re not excited about, remember two things. First, keep the reason you’re doing it front and center, and remind yourself that you’re here in pursuit of a larger goal. This will help you not feel stuck forever in a career you’re not happy about—and force you to make a change when you’re no longer gaining fulfillment from it.

Second, put in as much effort and enthusiasm as if it were actually your dream job—not only will this help you succeed later on, it will make your work atmosphere a bit more bearable.

 

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/should-i-take-a-job-offer-i’m-not-excited-about?ref=recently-published-2

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Early on in my career as an HR generalist, I realized that my favorite tasks had to do with recruitment and hiring—probably because my personality is more like a salesperson, and recruiting is the “sales” side of HR.

My career fantasies consisted of me getting to just focus on recruiting all day—finding and interviewing people, making offers, and convincing them this was the right opportunity for them. Eventually, I made my dreams happen and never looked back.

But is specialization always the right answer? Here are six questions to ask yourself to help you decide if it is, or if you should go the generalize route:

1. Who Are the People I Really Admire and Enjoy Working With?

Do you get excited when you talk with a specialist about what they do? What about their expertise gets you jazzed?
If you find your curiosity leads you down a rabbit hole of ever more detailed questions for them, then specialization could be a great fit for you. If you run out of questions or feel confused or bored, maybe you’re more of a “skim the surface” kind of person. There’s nothing wrong with that—business needs both kinds!

2. Would I Be Content Spending All Day Focused on One Thing?

If you’re in finance, you can take that in a lot of different directions. For those who like to dip their toes in all areas—from accounts receivable to treasury to budget management—specializing would be a downer.

But if you’ve seen all that and want to plumb the depths of one specific field, it may be just the right decision. Talk to a few people who work in those roles to make sure it’s what you think it is and you’ll enjoy it.

3. Will I Need More Education to Go Deep Into What I Really Want to Focus On?

Accountants and lawyers often face this dilemma early on. Tax accounting and tax law, for example, can be a fast path to high rewards, but they typically require advanced degrees and a lot of exposure to the specialty.

If you make that investment in yourself to go back to school, you’re making a long-term commitment to your craft. So be sure you really love it (and can afford it).

4. Will Specializing Increase or Decrease My Work-Life Balance?

It takes 10,000 hours to become an expert at anything, according to Malcom Gladwell’s book Outliers: The Story of Success.

Are you ready to spend a lot of time working to become a topic expert? How will that affect your relationships with your friends and family? It may be smart to ask for their opinion and support first, and decide for yourself if specializing will take away from the things you value outside of work.

5. Will I Box Myself Out of Future Opportunities if I Become Too Narrowly Focused?

It’s key to figure out if becoming a specialist will ultimately limit your career path down the road. Use your networking efforts to get a sense of where specializing will take you—and whether that sounds interesting to you.

Also, consider whether you feel more comfortable in a large organization or a small one. Small companies typically (but not always!) need more “utility players” willing to play several roles and fill in for others, whereas large enterprises often “divide and conquer,” solving problems with teams of specialists.

6. What’s My End Game?

If, down the road, you want to manage others, you might want to keep one foot in the generalist world. As a boss, you’ll need to be able to have credibility beyond your specialty to lead others.

However, if you’re more excited about becoming an expert in your field, specializing might be the way to go.

You may or may not already know all the right people willing to invest in you and advise you as you decide between specializing and generalizing.

If you don’t, that’s okay—but it’s key to have a strong network when making this decision. Talk with colleagues at your current company who are a few years ahead of you. Or, get in touch with fellow alumni who graduated from your university. Or, consider hiring a career coach who specializes in your industry or desired field.

Just be sure not to rush your decision—and know that you can always change your mind. Read a lot of articles and blogs, take people to coffee, listen to podcasts. In short, take your time. After all, this is your career—it’s worth getting right!

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/questions-ask-yourself-specialize-generalize?ref=recently-published-0

NSW Premier, Ms Gladys Berejiklian, and Health Minister, Mr Brad Hazzard, officially opened Gosford Hospital’s new 11-storey tower on June 23.

“Together with the $200m Wyong Hospital redevelopment, the $348m Gosford Hospital redevelopment is delivering next-generation, first-class health care to the Central Coast,” Ms Berejiklian said. “The technological advancements in the new 11-storey tower block are incredible, including for the first time, a nuclear medicine service which will greatly improve diagnoses for a range of conditions, and speed up scans for emergency patients. “The redevelopment is part of our government’s record $8b health infrastructure spend over the next four years,” Ms Berejiklian said. Mr Hazzard said clinicians and the community contributed to the innovative design.

“The new tower has been designed with patients in mind, with privacy and comfort front and centre,” he said. “The Intensive Care Unit has the largest windows of any public hospital in the state, and a courtyard with oxygen and gas fittings means that some of our sickest patients can be outside,” he added. The new tower features: a Special Care Nursery, with expanded capacity for newborn cots from 10 to 15, and pull-out beds for parents and carers; an Intensive Care Unit with glass screens that can be switched to opaque (instead of curtains); an MRI machine to diagnose stroke, cancer, infection and joint abnormalities; single or double rooms with an ensuite and a patient/relative lounge in each unit; and, dedicated staff and patient lifts to offer more privacy. The complete redevelopment, due to be finished by 2019, also includes a new $35.5m carpark and refurbished spaces for allied health, cancer day unit, emergency short stay unit and cardiovascular services.

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2018/07/hospital-new-11-storey-tower-opened/

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If you know you’re capable of doing more than fetching coffee (and I know you are!), then you need to walk into that interview room with the confidence and command that says so. How do you do that? Use these tips when readying yourself for your next interview.

1. Make a List of What You’re Great at

Think about the things that make you feel good about yourself. Are you gifted at organizing or creating systems and processes that improve efficiency? Or, are you great interpersonally and have a knack for making people feel heard and welcome?

Start creating a list of those attributes. This will not only shore up your inner confidence, but it will also give you content that you can relate to what your interviewer is looking for in the company’s next hire.

2. Think Through Your Day-to-Day

So you’re telling me that someone paid you for 40 hours each week plus benefits to only get coffee—and that’s it? Even the most prodigal of companies probably had a few more expectations than that.

When you’re struggling to think of other responsibilities, it’s helpful to talk through your day-to-day with a friend. It’s easy to take for granted the other things you do, and by relaying what you spend your day doing, you’ll be able to come up with significantly more content and depth than you previously thought.

For instance, in addition to getting coffee, did you also ensure the office was appropriately stocked and presentable for visitors and employees? Did you manage the conference room schedule and ready rooms for meetings? Did you liaise with building maintenance staff on the upkeep of the office?

Look at that! You’ve just described the background of a perfect office coordinator or administrative assistant.

3. Unlock Your Potential

Remember, potential is not what you’ve done, it’s what you can do. Rather than fixating on the most literal definition of yourself and what you’ve previously done, use this as an opportunity to think and dream expansively.

What more can you do? What more is within you? Listen carefully to the needs of the person interviewing you and find ways to relate your background or personality to those needs. Your previous job doesn’t define the whole you, nor should it define your potential.

The job search is enough to shake anyone’s confidence—particularly when you’ve convinced yourself that you don’t have valuable skills or experience to offer. But, I’m willing to bet you bring way more to the table than you think!

Put these tips to work, and you’ll tackle your job search with the confidence of someone who’s more than deserving of that open position.

 

Source:https://www.themuse.com/advice/job-search-with-confidence-when-skills-are-lacking?ref=the-muse-editors-picks-1

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Pelican feeding at The Entrance has been identified as an activity for review in the development of a Tourism Opportunity Plan, according to Central Coast Council staff.

Council’s Directorate of Connected Communities was responding to a question from The Entrance Ward Councillor, Bruce McLachlan. When Council met on May 7, Clr McLachlan asked: “What options do we have to monetise The Entrance Pelican Feeding, an example would be a photo stand and professional photography linked to a website or a photo next to a giant pelican statue? “This can be leased to an operator or Council run,” Clr McLachlan’s question added. “We have busloads of overseas tourists visiting the site and not adding to the local economy, before heading off to the Hunter Valley to spend their tourism dollars,” he said. In response, Council staff said: “Council endorsed the Central Coast Destination Management Plan 2018- 21 in December 2017. “This strategic document provides a high-level plan to support the growth of the visitor economy of the Central Coast region. “One of the deliverables of this overarching document is the development of a Tourism Opportunity Plan which will aim to identify specific opportunities to support the desired outcomes of the Destination Management Plan.

“Council is committed to exploring, in detail, and in conjunction with the local tourism industry, what greater opportunities can be identified to support the Visitor Economy of The Entrance and the greater Central Coast region. “The status of the Pelican Feed as an iconic and heavily-attended activity for our region, and the interest in it on both a local and international visitor level, has been considered by Council staff, and it is identified as an activity for review on the development of the Tourism Opportunity Plan,” the staff report said. “There are opportunities to improve the visitor experience and to prepare for any future increase in attendance and demand on the activity; including possible infrastructure, product development, revenue streams and marketing needs, and also to engage local businesses to leverage the activity to elevate the opportunities it has on the wider visitor economy. “Council staff would also like to note that the success of this activity to date has relied heavily on the dedication of a group of passionate volunteers, and it is our intention that they are consulted throughout the abovementioned process to ensure the Pelican Feed remains a sustainable activity that supports and contributes to managing the health and wellbeing of the local pelican population,” the report said.
Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2018/07/pelican-feeding-tourism-the-entrance/

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The Australian Reptile Park is turning 60 years old and is throwing a two-week long birthday extravaganza to celebrate during the school holidays.

July 2018 marks the sixth decade that the park has been open as The Australian Reptile Park, and the milestone is a huge achievement for the Central Coast wildlife sanctuary, which now welcomes over 250,000 visitors a year.

The upcoming school holidays will be all about the celebration of this momentous occasion with the biggest birthday party ever, including a jumping castle, mega slide, face painting, fairy floss and limited edition merchandise that will only be on sale these holidays. Also adding to the celebration,

The Australian Reptile Park’s four new Dingo puppies have reached the perfect age to come out and say hello to visitors. By popular demand, just for the 60th Celebration, there will be the return of daily appearances by our resident Tyrannosaurus Rex, to the delight of visitors, as a small taste of the Dinosaurs Alive! event that the Park runs during the Summer Holidays drawing record crowds. General Manager, Mr Tim Faulkner, said of the celebration: “The Australian Reptile Park is so incredibly special to not only me, but the whole region. “The families that come here, the memories that are made here, it’s all a one-of-a-kind experience. “People remember holding their first snake here, seeing their first huge saltwater croc or even just learning about our life-saving venom programs that save hundreds of lives every year.

“I couldn’t be prouder to see us doing better than ever in 2018. “We’re on track to see our biggest year yet and this holiday event is the best way to celebrate all of the Park’s achievements in tourism, animal education, conservation and venom programs,” Mr Faulkner said. The Australian Reptile Park has faced numerous challenges over the years that are now reflected on as hardships they were able to overcome. The park has faced a fire that destroyed most of the zoo in 2000, theft of various animals over the years, moving locations in 1996 and the death of Eric the Crocodile, a park icon, in 2008.

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2018/06/reptile-park-to-celebrate-60-years/

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The days when you had to put on a mask for work in the name of corporate conformity are over. They died with the wide-and-shiny neck tie, “kitchens” that looked like your dentist’s office, and other bad memories from yesteryear’s workplace.

Today’s workplace trades on inclusivity, empowerment, teamwork, and—in a word—realness.

Whatever your race, ethnicity, gender or sexual identity, it’s not only yours to embrace, but your employer’s. According to Deloitte’s 2017 Global Human Capital Trends report, 69% of executives say diversity and inclusion is an important issue. And that’s smart—because it’s good for business.

Recent research from Diversity Council Australia found that employees who work on inclusive teams are 10 times more likely to be highly effective than workers who don’t. They were also found to be more satisfied in their work, and studies have proven that happy employees are more productive.

So, it looks like it’s the perfect time to get real. Here are a few tips to make sure you can thrive as you at work.

Ask Upfront for a Diversity Onboarding

If you don’t identify as a white male (no shade if you do), chances are you have questions when entering a new workplace. What’s the policy to ensure women are paid as much as their male counterparts? Is there a mentorship program here and how can I find a mentor whose values align with my own? How can I help this company cultivate and hire diverse talent like myself?

Many reputable organizations will answer these as part of new-employee onboarding in the form of policies, videos, training, and general information. The goal should be to equip you with the knowledge and resources to work freely as your true self and ensure others can do the same.

If your new-hire briefing falls short of these expectations, don’t let your questions stew. Ask them. Doing so doesn’t mean you’re anticipating some sort of institutionalized discrimination (why would you join the company in that case?), it just means you’re curious and you’re looking forward to being part of progressive solutions to today’s workplace challenges.

Phrase questions to show that you’re curious about something meaningful to you and it’ll be easier to start the conversation: “I’m really passionate about women’s issues, I’d love to know what you do here to make sure women have access to leadership opportunities and equal pay?”

Join an Organization, or Start One

Whether you’re underrepresented at work or just have a really niche interest, joining a club—or starting one—is a great way to create space for the parts of you that don’t fit neatly into your job description.

Find groups that empower you—whether they’re creative or career development-oriented. The best part, clubs can fill voids if something you feel passionate about is not already reflected in your workplace. For example, if ladies aren’t exactly running the show (yet), a women’s group can be a great way to find support and mentorship. If people seem clueless when Pride rolls around, an LGBT+ alliance can change that.

If the group you’re looking to join doesn’t exist, consider starting it. Talk to HR or your manager and ask whether there’s a formal process in place to secure funding.

Be Aware of Your Biases, and Wake Others Up to Theirs

For better or for worse, we all carry unconscious biases. They’re woven into our minds from childhood and continue to proliferate in popular culture. These biases can affect our interpretations of and interactions with coworkers.

One of the best ways to be more self-actualized in the workplace is to help others be the same by granting them freedom from even small stereotypes and assumptions. Look into ways you can become more aware of your biases and spread the word to co-workers.

A few places to start: browse YouTube for bias exercises like this one, ask your colleagues for honest feedback, and pay close attention to your thoughts and reactions in groups (are you responding to hard facts and values, or assumptions and emotions?).

Grow Your Social Circle

Finally, it’s easier to be yourself if you’re among friends.

You can find them, but you may have to work for it. That means going to company events, grabbing coffee with new co-workers, switching your lunch crowd every so often, or hopping in new channels on Slack.

And try to connect with a range of coworkers, not just your immediate peers. You can learn from others who are different from you and who are in more senior or diverse roles. You may have to leave your comfort zone, but it’s well worth it—you’ll be more relaxed at work if you have a group of people supporting you.
Work should be inviting—not just because you like your work (although that’s a big plus), but because you can be yourself while you’re there. Whether your workplace is super progressive and has all the diversity and inclusion boxes checked, or you have to do some work to help get it there, use these tips to make your workday—and that of your coworkers’—more real.

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/bring-your-whole-self-to-work?ref=recently-published-1

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Making a career change is scary. It may seem easier to stay in a job that you’re comfortable with and good at, rather than taking the plunge into a totally different career. But, those who do take that plunge often end up happier.

That proverbial leap requires more preparation than simply closing your eyes and jumping, though. To be sure that you don’t end up at another job that leaves you unfulfilled, you need to have a plan of action.

Catherine Morgan, Career Transition Expert at Point A to Point B Transitions, sees clients take a variety of different career journeys—doing the same job in a different industry, doing a different job in the same industry, or finding a job that is completely different in both skill set and industry.

And while some people know deep down that making the transition is the right thing all along, others come to the realization after a major life event. Regardless of the catalyst, Catherine advises taking calculated steps once you’ve decided to change industries.

So if you’re ready to take the leap, here’s our best advice on how to set yourself up for a successful career change.
Follow Your Passion, Purpose, or Side Hustle.

If you’re considering a career change, you’re probably not fulfilled with your current role. But, before jumping into another unsatisfying job, take the time to figure out what would make you happy. 1 out of 5 people don’t feel engaged with their job, and we know you don’t want to remain one of them.

Finding your passion can seem daunting, but if you examine the things you enjoy most, it gets easier. When thinking about changing jobs, “people often pull from life experience or something they’ve been doing on the side,” says Catherine.

Think about your hobbies—do you love to cook, or read, or sew? What activities are you best at and bring you the most joy? While not every hobby can be turned into a full-time job, examining your interests outside of work is a great way to discover what type of career might make you happy.

Have a Strategy and Take Steps to Implement It
In most cases, a career change doesn’t happen overnight. It takes work and preparation—but don’t get overwhelmed. Once you have your big picture figured out, do the following:

1. Research
We know you know how to do some internet sleuthing. So, instead of stalking your ex online, use those detective skills to start researching potential employers. Check out their social media, website, and any other info you can find so that you can make an informed decision on whether a company is the right fit for you.

2. Network
Make a list of people you know who work in the field that you’re interested in. If you don’t know anyone personally that’s okay. Utilize LinkedIn to expand your search, and don’t forget to ask friends and family for their connections. You can even craft an email to friends explaining that you’re looking to change careers and would love to be connected with anyone they think could help.

Once you have contact information, look them up before reaching out. You’ll want to sound informed so people know their time won’t be wasted connecting with you. Request a coffee, informational interview, or even to shadow someone after you’ve made the first move.

3. Know What You’re Willing to Sacrifice
Before making a big shift, Catherine says, consider whether there is an opportunity to rework your current job situation. “Look at what you want and what would make you happier—less travel, working from home more, boundaries to disconnect,” she says.

If you are set on changing careers, there’s a lot to consider before leaving your current job. Before quitting evaluate what sacrifices you are willing to make in order to find a role that you love—can you take a pay cut, start in a lower position, do you have leverage to leave your job without having your next one lined up?

Knowing the answers to these questions beforehand will set you up for success and help narrow down potential jobs and employers.

The Results
Catherine says “the people I work with tend to be happy with their decisions, they are going into it with the right mindset and finding something valuable to them.” We spend the bulk of our time at work, so being happy with your job can make a huge difference.

So, if you think it’s time for a career change, follow the steps above—do your research, create a plan of action, and take the leap. You may just end up happier than you ever imagined.

 

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/why-a-career-change-may-make-you-happier?ref=recently-published-1

central-coast-council

Central Coast Council has won a state award for an educational program about Tuggerah Lakes involving three films and multi-touch books for use on iPads.

The council won the Environmental Leadership and Sustainability award at the 2018 NSW Local Government Awards for its Tuggerah Lakes Digital Resource and Communication Program.

The awards shine the spotlight on excellence in the NSW local government sector.

As part of its Estuary Education Program for Tuggerah Lakes, the council produced new and innovative education resources for the community including two free multi-touch books for iPads – a first for a local council in Australia – and three short films narrated by local children and featuring community members and staff.

The films were screened at local cinemas and have been viewed by more than 121,000 residents.

The council was also highly commended in the Creative Communities category for its work with the community on the Maliga Indigenous Arts and Cultural Showcase.

The Maliga (meaning ‘shine’ in Darkinjung) Indigenous Arts and Cultural Showcase was held at The Art House during Reconciliation Week, and this year included a new category for children aged 3 to 5.

Over the past five years Maliga has enabled more than 200 young indigenous people on the Central Coast to share and interpret cultural stories that lead to their growth and development.

Council’s acting chief executive officer, Brian Glendenning, said recognition at the awards was a great achievement for the council.

“I am delighted that Central Coast Council has received these two awards and been recognised for our dedication to sustainability as well as our excellence in bring together communities through art and cultural creative projects,” Mr Glendenning said.

“Council was also named a finalist in four other categories: Innovative Leadership and Management for Central Coast Future Council; Community Partnerships and Collaboration for The Harvest Festival Central Coast; Special Project Initiative for the Central Coast Community Strategic Plan; and Service Delivery Initiative for ‘Desexing Saves Lives – Responsible Pet Ownership on the Coast’.”​
Source: https://www.lakesmail.com.au/story/5471401/coast-council-wins-state-award-for-lake-films-project/

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There’s a magical period of time that can only be found between the day you leave one job and the day you actually start a new gig you’ve got lined up. There’s nothing else quite like it—a real vacation unmarred by work emergencies, project spillovers, or impending deadlines.

It’d be hard to judge anyone for dreaming of extending that blissful in-between phase and filling it with travel, rest, and all kinds of projects you haven’t had time to tackle. But usually, your old company wants you to stay as long as possible (at the very least the customary two weeks) and your new one wants you there as soon as possible.

And sometimes that leaves you with just a weekend to yourself. How in the world are you going to fit everything into a measly two days? The hard truth is that you can’t. But you can still have some fun, get some rest, and be ready to go.

Here are a few tips to help you plan it right and make the most of the time you have.

Celebrate—But Not Too Much

It’s natural to want to celebrate. But don’t overdo it. If you’re going to indulge in some drinks (or greasy foods for that matter), do it on Friday and remember what you already know about moderation. The last thing you want is day drink your way through Sunday and arrive at your new office feeling hungover.

Be Realistic About Your To-Do List

The biggest mistake you can make is to be too ambitious, according to Muse Career Coach Tara Goodfellow. If you try to take all the things you’d normally do in two weeks off and stuff them into one weekend, you’re going to get overwhelmed and stressed.

“If you go away or do a big weekend event, you’re setting yourself up to start drained,” she says. And if you sign up for that spin class you’ve never tried before and go so all out that you can’t move for two days afterwards, you’ll end up “sore, exhausted, and cranky.”

Easy on the organizing projects too. On Friday night, you might be determined to do a full spring cleaning, but by Sunday you might freak out when it’s nowhere near done and you’ll have to spend the next few weeks living in the mess that is a half-finished organizing job.

Frontload Any Prep You Still Have to Do

The key is to get this stuff out of the way as early as possible. That might mean setting out your first-day clothes when you get home on Friday, says Muse Career Coach Clayton Wert. Or maybe it’s sitting down with your laptop and a cup of coffee on Saturday morning and spending a few hours going over any materials you’ve been sent, jotting down some notes about things you want to remember or questions you have, or poking around LinkedIn to learn about your new team. Or perhaps it’s going out to do a little shopping on Saturday to pick up a new work bag to get you excited.

Sleep, Relax, and Take Care of Yourself

First, make sure you’re getting enough sleep on each of the three nights you’ve got, Wert emphasizes. But beyond that, he says, “do what you need to do to feel good, what puts you in a positive mindset.”

Once you’ve done your last bit of prep, start winding down and do whatever it is that makes you feel relaxed and recharged. That could mean going on a run, taking the yoga class you love, getting a massage, sitting down with a good book for a few hours, or visiting your favorite coffee shop.

Unplugging and doing whatever activity you know you enjoy can help alleviate stress and anxiety you might not even realize is there, Goodfellow says. And if you are aware of your nerves, don’t be afraid to share that with those close to you.

“Sometimes people don’t realize how normal it is to be nervous. They think they should just be excited,” she says. “It’s okay to communicate those fears and concerns and anxieties with people. A lot of times that’s held in,” she adds, but letting it out can provide some comfort.

“Focus on the Positive Things Ahead”

Sometimes the hardest part of the transition isn’t starting the new job, but breaking free from the old one and processing any difficult emotions it left you with. And such an abbreviated break in between might exacerbate that stress.

“Instead of still trying to hold on to the baggage, put that on the back burner for now. You can’t carry that with you the first week or two [of your new job], which is not to say you shouldn’t go back to it,” says Muse Career Coach Eloise Eonnet.

But in this quick turnaround scenario, “focus on the positive things ahead,” she says. “Imagine yourself in great detail a year from now at that company. What are the kinds of relationships you’ve built? What projects are you working on?”

Spending your time visualizing your happy future at your new job—rather than rehashing the terrible boss or toxic culture you dealt with at your last one—will help you start off on the right foot.

We’d never argue that having just a couple days between jobs is exactly as refreshing as having a few weeks. But that doesn’t mean you can’t make the most of that weekend. And don’t forget to think ahead. Carve out some time for self-care in the first weeks at your new job, even if it’s just slotting in a yoga class every Thursday or time to go to the park every weekend.

Finally, plan a real vacation or even just a long weekend, whatever your new time-off policy and company culture allows. Make sure it’s not too far out of sight and start looking forward to it.

 

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/make-most-of-weekend-only-time-between-jobs?ref=recently-published-0

$52m For Gosford CBD

Posted by | June 2, 2018 | Community, News

CC gosford 52m

NSW Planning Minister Anthony Roberts has joined local MPs at the Central Coast Leagues Club Field today, to announce an investment of $52 million in funding for infrastructure and public space in Gosford.

Anthony Roberts says they’re looking to shore up public amenities like sewerage and stormwater drains, so they can cope with the influx of current and future developments in Gosford CBD.

“(It’s) $42 million to underpin the jobs and investment that will be coming to Gosford,” Mr Roberts says. “It’s for that key infrastructure that Councils sometimes find difficult to fund. Paying for that means it’s easier for Council and private enterprise to come and invest here.”

“On top of that… we have $10 million for a major upgrade of parks and streetscapes in Gosford, including a regional park (on the Leagues Club field), to make this even more of a destination for people.”

Mr Roberts says the funding will help bring more jobs to the Coast during construction and thereafter.

He’s also confident Gosford will be able to attract tech incubators and startups into the future.

The Minister’s also announced they’re planning to lower developer contributions in Gosford’s CBD from 4% down to 3% to further encourage development.

Today’s revelations coincide with the release of two reports by the NSW Government Architect, suggesting on how to connect the upgraded Gosford Hospital to the northern end of the CBD, and how to link Gosford’s waterfront to Mann Street.

We’ve got until June 18 to leave our feedback on these, though Central Coast Mayor Jane Smith’s called for more time.

“I think the important thing is the community has the opportunity to have a close look at this,” Ms Smith says. “We already have $1.69 billion worth of approved developments, so we need to look at what implications these announcements will have on those.”

“The consultation period in my view needs to be extended… we need longer to really consult with our community. Council needs to be at the centre of planning.”

 

Source: https://www.2gofm.com.au/news/central-coast/52m-for-gosford-cbd

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The first 90 days of your new job are crucial to set yourself up for long-term career success. It’s where you make good on the promises you touted during your interview and set the stage for how people perceive you.

That’s why asking for feedback during this time is so, so important. It quickly demonstrates to your new boss that you’re invested, you’re committed to excellence, and that you’re in this for the long haul.

Plus, if done well, you can earn major brownie points that may help you get recognized later for opportunities to work on interesting projects or even advance more quickly.

Easy enough, right? Now that you know just how important your first 90 days are, here are some guidelines for how to ask for feedback to ensure you’re on the right path (or how to get on it).

When Should You Ask?

Eliciting feedback in these crucial first few days is a balance between giving your new manager and co-workers enough time to form concrete thoughts and opinions of you, while also being proactive in prompting feedback that will help you as you get onboarded.

Rule of thumb: Don’t expect a formal review by the end of week one. After that, it’s all a judgement call. How much real work have you actually had a chance to do? If you’ve just completed a big project or finished a tougher assignment, now may be the perfect time to ask for some input on how you did. Regardless of the above, don’t let three weeks go by without making the big ask.

A good rhythm for how frequently you continue to check-in will hinge on the volume and involvement of your work. That said, a good best practice is no more than once a week, but no less than once a month.

How Should You Ask?

Don’t pounce at the water cooler or in the bathroom while your boss is washing her hands. Reach out to your manager via email or in person and request a meeting directly. Explain what the meeting is for—people will appreciate having a heads-up so they can prepare ideas ahead of time.

Try something like, “I’d like 15 minutes of your time to talk about how you think things are going so far with me. Are you satisfied with what I’m doing, and the work I’m producing? Is there anything I can be doing differently?”

What Should You Ask?

Give your manager suggestions on what you want to hear, such as, “How am I integrating within the team?” “Am I operating at the speed you need me to?” or “How is the quality of my work? Any development areas you have already identified that I can work on?”

This is also the time to coach your manager on what you need in terms of resources. Would you benefit from regular one-on-ones or additional training? Perhaps a tracking system that you and your manager have access to to share what you’re working on?

Who Should You Ask?

Besides your boss, co-workers are also a great resource for feedback. While it doesn’t need to be as formal as with a manager, try crafting an email along the lines of, Hey, I’m loving it here so far, and would love to get some feedback from you to make sure I’m setting myself up for long term success. It’s really important to me I’m doing a good job and making a good impression.

The reality of soliciting feedback is that it may not always be 100% positive. So, prepare yourself mentally. All your good intentions will immediately be nullified if you go into “defensive” mode. Keep your ego out of this conversation and stay open and non-judgmental.

Then, send a follow-up email thanking your manager or colleague for their time and candor, and briefly outline your takeaways and any next steps you plan to take. Implement any areas of improvement right away and follow-up with your boss to make sure the adjustments you’re making are correct and noticed.

We know there’s a lot to learn in your first 90 days. You’ve got new systems, technologies, faces, and names to remember, and so much more. It’s easy to feel overwhelmed.

Incorporating this advice displays maturity and commitment on your part, and will also give you a good indication of whether you’re doing well, or need to make some adjustments before its too late. Regardless of what you learn, it will empower you to excel in your new role.

 

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/how-to-ask-for-feedback-first-90-days-successful-new-job

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CENTRAL Coast Council has outlined plans for spending almost $200 million on projects in its capital works program for 2018-19.

The plans are detailed in the 2018-19 Draft Delivery Program, Operational Plan including the budget plan and draft resourcing strategy which are now on exhibition for public comment.

Council’s plan will deliver $561.5m in essential services, and $199.8m in capital works in priority areas.

Among the planned projects are.-

$1.3m to deliver the Norah Head Masterplan and deliver key amenity upgrades in the key tourism area;
$2m to construct the Mardi to Warnervale trunk water pipe;
$1.8m to implement a shared pathway and footpath program;
$1.8m for a regional skate park and play space at Lake Munmorah; and
$2.5m to finish construction of the Central Coast Regional Sporting Complex at Tuggerah.

 
Source: https://www.lakesmail.com.au/story/5421397/coast-council-plans-200m-spend-on-works/

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Central Coast Library Service is offering a number of free study workshops for Central Coast high school students undertaking the HSC in 2018.

The workshops aim to create a ‘stress free HSC’ to help calm nerves, and maximise potential and results during this critical time. The free events are open to senior students from years 10 through to 12, and will be led by a series of experts to equip students with the tools they need to succeed. Council Acting Unit Manager Libraries, Ms Beth Burgess, said these events are a fantastic opportunity for students to get hints and tips from professionals without the cost.

“We understand that the senior years of school are an important and often stressful time for many students and we are pleased to offer this special series of events for our community.” Ms Burgess said. “The initiative is part of the Library’s investment to assist with meeting educational needs across the Coast and we encourage all year 10, 11 and 12 students to take advantage of these excellent learning opportunities.”

Events will be held in the Tuggerah, Toukley and Erina libraries as follows: May 19, Activated HSC workshop, The Tempest; May 24, Understanding PIPs and Society and Culture; June 2, A Parent’s Guide to the HSC: Supporting your child through Years 11 and 12; June 7, Decoding HSC English; June 23, Acing the HSC Trials, effective exam preparation workshop; September 1, What you need to do to score top marks.

 

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2018/05/free-hsc-workshops-central-coast/

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There’s one thing you likely already know: If you still have an objective statement perched at the top of your resume, it’s time for some serious updating.

That formal (and, let’s be honest, totally useless) blurb of the past has since made way for something new: a summary statement.

So… uhh… what exactly is a summary statement? It’s a few short lines or bullet points that go at the top of your document and make it easy for the hiring manager to understand your experience and qualifications. Basically, it explains what you bring to the table for that employer.

It sounds simple in theory. But, if you’re anything like me, when you sit down to actually crank out that brief little blurb, you’re left staring at a menacing blinking text cursor for a good half hour. Yes, even I struggle with these—and I make my living as a writer.

Fortunately, there’s nothing like a little bit of inspiration to get your creative juices flowing. So, I’ve pulled together three real resume summary statements that are sure to get a hiring manager’s attention.

Extract some lessons from what these people did well, and you’ll take a little bit of the stress and pain out of writing your own.

Who Needs a Summary Statement?

Just wait—before we jump right into the samples, this is an important question to answer.

If you’re one of those people who has righteously told yourself, “Psh, summary statement? I don’t need one of those!”—well, you might be right, they work better for some people than for others.

“Summary statements are usually best for more experienced professionals with years of experiences to tie together with a common theme. Or, alternatively, they can be used to tie together disparate experiences with a set of key transferable skills,” explains Muse writer, Lily Zhang, in her article on the topic.

If you’re someone with a pretty straightforward career history and path, that precious real estate might be better used for bullet points, rather than this type of paragraph. But, if you’re an experienced candidate or are changing careers? This could be just what you need to make your resume a little more cohesive.

1. Start by Saying Who You Are

“Editorial-minded marketer and communications strategist transforming the way brands interact with audiences through content. With over seven years of experience at consumer startups, media companies, and an agency, brings a thoughtful perspective and blend of creative chops and digital data-savvy. Entrepreneurial at heart and a team player recognized for impassioned approach and colorful ideas.”

Why it Works: “This is a great example of a concise and compelling summary because it explains who this professional is (first line), puts her experience into context (second line), and highlights her intangible strengths (final sentence),” explains Jaclyn Westlake, career expert, resume writer, and writer for The Muse, of this summary she worked on with a client.

But, what this statement does exceptionally well is start with a powerful statement about exactly who this candidate is and what she does. “If this were the only sentence a hiring manager read about this candidate, she’d still have a pretty good idea what this person is about,” Westlake adds.

2. Make it an Elevator Pitch

“High-achieving Enterprise software account manager driven to increase sales in established accounts while reaching out to prospects. Help Fortune 500 companies gain a competitive edge and increase revenue by identifying customer needs, providing recommendations, and implementing technology products that solve problems and enhance capabilities.”

Why it Works: One way to make writing your own resume summary statement easier? Think of it like an elevator pitch.

Since employers care most about what sort of value you can add to their organization, it’s smart to follow in the footsteps of this sample and use the bulk of your summary to emphasize not only what you do, but why it’s important.

“This summary clearly articulates who he is, whom he serves, and how he helps,” says Theresa Merrill, Muse Master Career Coach, of this client sample she provided.

Maybe you won’t use words like “gain a competitive edge” or “increase revenue” in your own statement. But, give some thought to how your skills and expertise help the overall organization, and then weave that into your statement.

3. Keep it Short

“Award-winning journalist and digital producer offering extensive experience in social media content curation, editing, and storytelling. Adept at transforming complex topics into innovative, engaging, and informative news stories.”

Why it Works: This one is significantly shorter than the other statements included here. But, that doesn’t mean it’s any less effective.

“It’s short and sweet,” says Merrill of this statement she wrote for a client, “It highlights his expertise right away with a word like ‘award-winning’ and also shares what makes him unique.”

When you’re trying to keep things to one page, you know by now that space is limited on your resume. So, the more concise you can make your statement—while still ensuring it still packs a punch—the better.

If you do choose to move forward with a resume summary statement, remember to treat it as your own personal highlight reel.

“A summary isn’t meant to be a regurgitation of the information already on your resume,” concludes Westlake, “It should serve to further enhance the reader’s understanding of your experience, specialties, and strengths. It’s also an excellent way to tie your work history together to help hiring managers better understand how your experience would translate into the role they’re recruiting for.”

Think through what you bring to the table and then use these three samples as your inspiration, and you’re sure to craft a resume summary statement that grabs that hiring manager’s attention

 

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/3-resume-summary-examples-thatll-make-writing-your-own-easier

Ettalong Beach by FotoSleuth

Here are more great job opportunities available on our wonderful Central Coast.  Click here and take a look!

to do list

Let’s face it — life can get really crazy sometimes, especially when we’re trying to balance work, family, a social life, and whatever other real-world obligations come our way on a daily basis. For that reason it’s vital to understand ways to make a better to-do list, in order to keep us organized, understand what things absolutely need to be completed, and to actually be able to finish them in a timely manner.
It seems like an easy enough thing to do, right? Sit down with a pen and a piece of paper and jot down the things we need to get done that day. However, there is really an art to creating the best of the best to-do lists — ones that will truly help us to meet deadlines and ultimately feel less stressed and more accomplished.

I know plenty of people who tell me they never make to-lists because they feel they’re a waste of time. These are the same people I encounter in my life who forget to follow up on emails, or send things when they say they will, or even return phone calls or texts. Their head is always in the clouds, so to say. They live in the moment — which is fine for certain types of work and living situations — but definitely is a challenging way of life for those of us with more regimented jobs and family responsibilities. For those who live for structure, I’ve got you covered in this article. Following some of these tips could be a game-changer for you, as I know they have been for me.

Here are seven ways to make a better to-do list.

1. Consider Quality Vs. Quantity

I am notorious for making extremely long to-do lists. For one, I love the feeling of being able to cross something off the list, so even the little things bring me joy. Secondly, I have a million balls spinning at once all day so without these lengthy lists sometimes I honestly will forget to drop off clothes at the dry cleaner if I don’t write it down.

According to Forbes, a good way to prevent us from bogging down our lists with meaningless items is to remember that by focusing on the big things (quality vs. quantity), we’ll be much more effective at our jobs, and in our broader lives as well. Forbes recommended keeping your list as short as possible, and really weighing a task before considering if you need to write it down. I’m not going to recommend you eliminate a task that you might genuinely forget to do. Rather, if you know every morning you start your day by responding to emails, no need to write that at the top of your list for tomorrow. Try your hardest to focus on the bigger things.

2. Make Your List The Night Before

It’s such a nice feeling waking up and already knowing what you need to accomplish that day, rather than spending the first hour flustered as you respond to emails and scribble a list. To achieve a level of uber-organization, try making your to-do list the night before. This will prevent you from having to waste your energy in the morning figuring out what things need to get done, according to Reader’s Digest. Also, making the list the night before can help calm your mind before you sleep so you’re not waking up in the middle of the night feeling anxiety over little things you might otherwise forget to do the next day.

3. Try To Start The List With The Hardest Task

Have to talk to your boss today about a failed project? Likely you’re completely dreading it, so get it over with at the start of the day. By tackling something difficult first thing you can create a sense of achievement that you’ll take with you for the rest of the day, according to foundr. Also, that hard thing will be done. It will feel so nice. It doesn’t always have to be uncomfortable conversations to start the day, just try to think of which task is going to be most difficult, and move it to the top of the list.

4. From There, Try A Sequential Approach

It’s only been in recent years that I’ve been such a crazy organization freak, but prior to that I used to create to-do lists by writing the day at the top of the page and then jotting down items as they came to my mind, rather than by when they needed to be completed. For a writer, this is a horrible approach because you’re constantly working against deadlines. You need a sequence!

Real Simple suggested a sequential approach to list making that organizes tasks by morning, afternoon, and evening. If you want to make it even more granular, the outlet suggested breaking down whether it will be completed at home, work, or wherever else. Keep our first tip in mind her, though, and try to keep your list of items short and sweet.

5. Include Time Estimates

I have come to live by this tactic mostly becomes it helps me see how many things I can realistically get accomplished in a day, and also because it keeps me motivated to finish assignments in a timely manner. Try adding a time estimate next to each item when you’re creating a list — whether you think it’s going to take you 15 minutes or three hours. Omar Kilani, cofounder of to-do list app Remember The Milk, told Fast Company doing this means “you can make realistic decisions about how much you can really fit into your day.”

6. Try Using An “Other” Section

This tip is a personal recommendation for those like me who despise ending a day without being able to cross every item off their list. I always keep a side list of “Other” items — things that don’t necessarily need to be completed that day, but that I don’t want to lose sight of completely. If I finish my must-do tasks early on a given day, I’ll move to the “Other” section and start ticking those off.

7. Limit The Amount Of Meetings In Your Day

This last one isn’t a tip for writing the list, but rather a way to help ensure you can achieve the items on it. Ever have one of those days where you’ve created an achievable to-do list, as the day goes on you’re pulled into meeting after meeting, then by 5:00 have not been able to complete one of your list items? It happens to us all from time to time.

Where possible, try to limit the amount of meetings in your day. TheMuse.com recommended before you schedule a meeting considering whether the issue could be resolved with an email, phone call, or a quick few minute conversation by the water cooler. If you absolutely need the meeting, try to keep it focused on the fewest number of key agenda items as possible, least number of participants, and the shortest amount of time possible, according to the outlet.

By taking the time in advance to make the right kind of to-do list, you can ultimately be much more productive, deadline-oriented, and overall effective in your work and home life. Take note of these tips, get yourself organized, and start getting things accomplished!

 

Source:  Erica Florentine | https://www.bustle.com/articles/142527-7-ways-to-make-a-better-to-do-list

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The City of Brisbane Investment Corporation, Brisbane City Council’s future fund, continues its acquisitive streak, emerging as the buyer of the A-grade purpose-built Australian Taxation Office building complex in Gosford in Sydney’s central coast.

CBIC bought the completed property at 99 Georgiana Terrace and 38 Mann Street from Canberra-based developer and owner Doma Group for $43.5 million.

Doma Group was shopping for a buyer prior to the property’s completion last year, as foreshadowed by The Australian Financial Review.

Coinciding with the sale of the 7380sq m office building and two-storey heritage building at 99 Georgiana Terrace and 38 Mann Street, the ATO has also completed its move into the building.

The ATO has been moving into the building progressively since late last year, and completed occupation last week. It will lease the property for 10 years.

The sale of the property, which went through a tender, closed at a 6.9 per cent passing yield.

Colliers International’s Paul Powderly, James Barber and Adam Leacy brokered the deal.

The property drew strong interest given its long government tenure.

With yield compression in commercial property at record lows, local and foreign investors are focusing on quality and tenure of tenant to secure strong long-term cash flows.

The CBIC, which at times drew criticism for its property investment activity, previously invested in commercial property until 2014 until it branched out into ­residential and retail development. It was set up in 2008 by Campbell Newman when he was ­Brisbane Lord Mayor.

Like all investors, the CBIC has traded other buildings as part of a capital recycling strategy such as the sale of the Bowen Hills commercial complex at 41 O’Connell Terrace for $52 million in 2016.

 

Source: http://www.afr.com/real-estate/the-city-of-brisbane-investment-corporation-buys-gosford-ato-for-435-million-20180430-h0zfze

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I sat fidgeting in an uncomfortable chair that was placed adjacent to my boss’ expansive desk, feeling the sweat already start to tickle my forehead. I kept picking at a piece of torn upholstery toward the bottom of the seat, despite my best attempts to look cool, calm, and collected. But, no matter how many articles I crank out about successfully putting in your two weeks notice, I’ll admit it’s pretty tough to look confident and composed when you’re quitting your job.

That’s exactly what I was doing. I was seated across from a man who had been my manager for years—starting when I was just a college intern to when the company took me on full-time—and explaining to him that I was hitting the road.

“So, I guess you could consider this my two weeks’ notice,” I said to him while doing my best to avoid any direct eye contact. “Oh, here, I put it in writing too, in case you need that or, like, something,” I added while practically throwing him an unsealed envelope and simultaneously trying to edge my way out of the room.

“Well, this is a surprise,” he said, with a forced smile on his face. “Where are you going? Did you receive a better offer elsewhere?”

I swallowed nervously, took a deep breath, and attempted to keep my voice from trembling. “No, not exactly,” I replied, trying to stifle the nauseous feeling that was slowly rising from my stomach to my throat.

“So, why are you leaving?” he pressed, “Where are you going?”

“I want to be a freelance writer. I’m going to do that full-time,” I quickly responded.

His face said it all. Like so many others, he was confused as to why I would leave the comfort and security of a traditional, full-time job (and, hello, health benefits!) for a life of uncertainty as a freelancer.

I wanted to explain to him that this was something I just had to do. I’d been thinking about it for ages, and I could no longer tolerate it being only that—a thought. I needed to take action and give it a try.

But, in reality, I didn’t say any of that. Instead, I kept my mouth shut. Why? Well, the truth of the matter was I didn’t really have a plan that I could share with him. Sure, I had one big client that I was hoping would carry me until I could get things off the ground (that client actually ended up dropping me only a few months later, but that’s a story for another time). But beyond that, I didn’t have any other potential opportunities lined up. I lived in a small town with very few connections to the type of work I wanted to be doing. I really had no idea how I was going to go about running my own freelance business. Oh, and I had absolutely zero clue how I was going to pay those pesky things called bills.

As someone who loves security and predictability, to this day I have no idea what came over me. But, regardless of the fact that I didn’t really know what was coming next, I quit my job anyway.

Looking back, jumping ship from my full-time position with no firm back-up plan in place probably wasn’t the smartest thing. And, I’m definitely not trying to encourage you to march into your own boss’ office tomorrow and use that exact same tactic—unless you’re prepared for a lot of shameless crying into an open carton of those delicious (and somewhat addicting) frosted animal crackers.

However, I do think taking that terrifying leap of faith was one of the most enlightening career experiences I’ve had so far. Call it stupid, impulsive, or brave—at the very least, it was educational. Here are a few of the (many, many, many) things I learned.

 

1. You Don’t Need the Approval of Others

When I would tell people about my plan to sprint away from my cubicle in favor of the freelance life, I so desperately wanted them to reassure me with statements like, “Oh wow, you’re so brave!” “Good for you!” or even a friendly and dad-like, “Go get ’em, tiger!”

Unfortunately, that’s not really what I got. Instead, I was faced with a lot of, “Wait, you’re doing what?” types of comments.

In the end, it really didn’t matter. I was the only one who needed to feel good about my decision. And I did—at least in between the animal cracker crying sessions mentioned earlier. Yes, we all naturally crave approval and reassurance from others every now and then. But, trust me, you don’t need it—at least not as much as you think you do.

 

2. Scary Is Exciting

There’s a reason that people fork over wads of cash in order to see a horror film about possessed grandparents or to walk through a haunted house where someone is guaranteed to leap out with a chainsaw. There’s a big part of being terrified that makes you want to run and cry—but the other piece is actually somewhat thrilling.

In the first few days (ahem, alright, months) after leaving my full-time gig, I’d sit down at my computer and feel totally overwhelmed. Every day was a battle to try to scrounge up work and at least take one step in the right direction. But, at the same time, I felt absolutely exhilarated. I had no idea what was coming next, and that actually made me feel surprisingly motivated and optimistic. It was one of the most distressing, nauseating, and anxiety-inducing times in my life—but it was also the most exciting.

 

3. You Never Know Until You Try

I hate to sound like a cheesy, cliché high school commencement speech. But, this sentiment really does ring true. You have no idea what you’re capable of until you push yourself to try it.

I’ll be honest—it’s not that I strongly disliked my full-time job. However, it didn’t set my heart on fire either. A big chunk of my duties were administrative. And, while I did perfect the art of mail merging like a total boss, I didn’t really feel all that challenged or fulfilled by my work.

However, as a self-described creature of habit, I think that I likely could’ve dealt with that mundaneness for the rest of my life. There was a big part of me that figured I was suited for that sort of life and career. It was safe and predictable. I was content.

Fast forward to now, and I’ve accomplished things that I never even thought were a possibility for me. I’ve been published places that I assumed were mere pipe dreams. I’ve worked with people who are essentially celebrities in my eyes. Just think—none of it would’ve happened if I had stayed with the “safe” route.

 

4. Your Career Really Doesn’t Define You

We all have the tendency to use our careers to define ourselves. But, it’s important to remember that your job isn’t who you are—it’s what you do. As Muse Managing Editor Jenni Maier explained in her article about being laid off, your position definitely adds to your life, but it doesn’t make up the entirety of it.

When I left my job, I felt the need to justify my decision and clarify every last detail until people were literally snoring in front of me. There was this immense need to explain my employment situation in order to give myself a purpose and identity.

Turns out, that’s really not the case—all of that pressure to define myself using my career was totally self-imposed. In fact, most people honestly didn’t care if I was a dog walker or the Dalai Lama. Although, above anything else, they were most likely just wondering why I gave them a play-by-play career breakdown when all they asked was, “Paper or plastic?”

Jumping ship from my full-time job was undoubtedly one of the scariest career decisions I’ve made in my life thus far. But, even though it had my knees shaking and my palms sweating, I’m glad I did it. It’s worked out well so far, and I’ve managed to learn a lot along the way.

So, if you’re contemplating taking your own leap of faith anytime soon, I hope these lessons encourage you and help you see the light at the end of the tunnel. And, in those moments when all you feel is sheer panic? Well, reach out to me on Twitter. I’ll come running—frosted animal crackers in tow.

 

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/4-lessons-i-learned-from-quitting-my-job-with-no-backup-plan

1

LAKE Haven Centre will match dollar-for-dollar the money raised by shoppers for an initiative to help alleviate youth unemployment and disengagement in the northern section of the Central Coast.

Lake Haven Centre and Beacon Foundation have launched the Light the Way initiative.

Beacon Foundation is a national not-for-profit organisation which motivates young people for a successful post-secondary school career.

It equips students with the skills and confidence required to make the transition from school to work and reduce the rate of youth unemployment.

Light the Way will involve a $1-per-ticket raffle for a Hisense 50-inch ultra high-definition ULED smart TV from JB Hi-Fi; and a money spinner in which shoppers (and children) will be invited to drop a coin in and pick up a balloon.

Both activities will be available at the customer service desk at the shopping centre.

Lake Haven Centre manager Mike Cochrane urged locals to support the initiative.

“Light the Way is an opportunity for our community to come together and support the work of Beacon Foundation,” Mr Cochrance said.

“We are proud to work with Beacon to engage young people in the northern Central Coast to achieve careers success and help alleviate issues of unemployment.

“Lake Haven and Vicinity Centres will match every dollar raised during our Light the Way campaign, which will ensure the Beacon programs continue to provide support for young people in our community.”

The raffle tickets and money spinner will be available from 9am on Friday, May 25, to 4pm, on Saturday, May 26.

 

Source: https://www.lakesmail.com.au/story/5376851/lake-haven-helps-tackle-youth-unemployment-video/

Weekly local jobs update

Posted by | April 23, 2018 | Weekly Update

Koolewong and Tascott by Maurice van Creij

Whether you’re looking for a casual, part-time, tradie, professional, or clerical role, if you want to work on the Central Coast, you’ll find them all on Jobs On The Coast – just click here!

1

MICHAEL Cassel, it seems, is a man with more titles than Roger Federer.

He was tasked with leading the revitalisation of Newcastle and co-ordinating Newcastle’s light rail delivery. And now Mr Cassel will add another job title to his impressive curriculum vitae: chief executive officer of Central Coast Regional Development Corporation.

Planning and Housing Minister Anthony Roberts announced the appointment on Monday as the government released plans to revitalise and enhance the Gosford city centre.

Mr Cassel said he looked forward to working with Central Coast Council, Coordinator General Lee Shearer and other stakeholders to “help bring the bold vision for the region and its capital to life”.

Mr Cassel, the Revitalising Newcastle program director and chief executive of the Hunter Development Corporation, has overseen the Newcastle light rail construction.

Mr Roberts said Mr Cassel had been “instrumental in leading change and transforming Newcastle”.

Source: https://www.lakesmail.com.au/story/5332428/cassel-to-head-up-gosford-renewal/

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The first-ever Central Coast Festival of Women, held across several venues to celebrate International Women’s Day, was declared a success.

The festival recognised and celebrated the achievements and contributions of women on the Central Coast and raised awareness of gender issues still present in the community. The theme for the inaugural festival was ‘Press for Progress’. The Gosford RSL hosted the launch of the festival on Friday, March 2. The evening showcased the strong support for woman’s equality on the Central Coast, with many infl uential female leaders coming together to speak at the event. Among those present was Mayor, Jane Smith, Member for Dobell, Ms Emma McBride, Member for Robertson, Ms Lucy Wicks, Member for Gosford, Ms Liesl Tesch and Ms Anne Charlton, Labor’s candidate for Robertson. “There is more that unites us than divides us,” Ms Wicks said. “That is how we are going to press for progress, by focusing on the things that unite us,” she said. Mayor, Jane Smith, spoke about new initiatives being taken up by Central Coast Council to press for progress, including working toward becoming a white ribbon accredited workplace.

“That means a commitment from our leaders to update policies and procedures that will ensure a culture of respect and gender equality at all levels of our organisation,” Mayor Smith said. Ms McBride gave her speaking time to a 15-year-old student, Arabella, who overcame an issue of gender disparity at her school with the help of her local MP. Arabella was moved to tears as she described the feeling of empowerment and gratitude toward Ms McBride. “I was really taken back,” Arabella said. “There’s someone who actually cares. “It was incredible to realise that I had a voice and I could speak up,” she said. Ms Tesch reminded the audience that there is still work to be done, particularly in the area of Indigenous affairs. “I encourage everyone to walk alongside all of our Aboriginal sisters, because in that space, as women, we have a long way to go.”

Other events held as part of the festival included the International Women’s Day Lunch, hosted by the View Club Bateau Bay, at the Entrance Leagues Club, on March 6. The International Women’s Day Forum, hosted by Central Coast Community Women’s Health Centre, took place on March 7, followed by several International Women’s Day Breakfasts. The festival fi nished on Sunday, March 11, with the annual International Women’s Day Breakfast at the Reef Restaurant, The Haven, featuring guest speaker, Ms Joanne McCarthy, a Central Coast resident and Newcastle Herald journalist, whose investigation of child abuse in the Catholic church resulted in her winning the 2013 Gold Walkley Award for excellence in journalism. “I certainly hope this will become an annual tradition that we celebrate with great pride,” Ms Wicks said in concluding her remarks at the festival launch.

Source: Media release, Feb 12 Sally Jope, Central Coast International Women’s Day Organising Committee Event transcripts, Mar 2 Central Coast Festival of Women launch Olivana Smith-Lathouris, Journalist

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2018/04/festival-women-declared-success/