kibblexParking-640x437

Gosford Erina Business Chamber (GEBC) is pushing for a new parking facility to be established near the corner of Erina and Albany St North, Gosford, with the eventual demolition of the Kibbleplex building set to rob the CBD of 600 car parking spaces.

The Lederer Group, which owns the building on Henry Parry Dr, has a Development Application under assessment with the State Planning Department which would see Kibbleplex demolished as the first step in the development of a $345.4M five tower residential and retail development on the site. Chamber President, Rod Dever, said the subsequent loss of parking in the heart of the CBD would put additional stress on commuters and local business people needing long term parking.

“Parking in Gosford and surrounds is always a point for discussion and one where members of the Chamber have requested appropriate actions to alleviate issues with access to business and access to parking for local businesses, ” Dever said. “One of our core issues is presently the number of commuters who leave the Coast daily for employment who then need to take up all day parking to facilitate their travel by public transport. “Gosford is a major transport hub but long term parking is limited.

“In 2018, the Chamber undertook a survey of parking and noted that local parking is filling up early. “In 2019, the introduction of parking sensors in the city seems to stop people overstaying in time limited parking, but it is not addressing the need for all day parking for city workers and commuters.

 

“With 600 spaces in the Kibbleplex building, the Chamber has for almost two years been engaging with Council for solutions to the eventual loss of this facility. “We understand that there is an extended lease on the facility.  “However, we imagine now that the DA is progressing, that this lease would not be renewed.

“The Chamber has recommended that a new facility could be built near to the corner of Erina and Albany St North, which is less than 60 metres away from the Kibbleplex site. “Council already owns some land in this area but may have to acquire other land holdings. “The public and business (people) already park in this area so it has proven that this would be used but there also needs to be consideration to more than 600 spaces as the current parking is full most days now.

“We need to think for the future and have better facilities to support the city and our increasing population. “To create 1,000 spaces would allow for some growth and additional parking which is then not in an intrusive location and detracting to the city. ” A Central Coast Council spokesperson said that Council was investigating parking options, with a report expected to be handed down to councillors early next year.

“As a short-term strategy, Council has constructed a 190-space same level carpark at 10 Racecourse Rd and has line marked a 170-space carpark at Adcock Park, ” the spokesperson said. “These 360 spaces will be connected to the Gosford CBD through a Park and Ride (shuttle bus) service which is currently at the tendering stage.

“Once the tender process is complete, Council will promote the availability of these spaces and the shuttle bus service to the community. “Council is currently undertaking a Central Coast Parking Strategy which includes medium to long-term strategies to deliver additional parking stations.

“Council is conducting investigations into the feasibility of constructing additional parking stations within walking distance of the CBD and on the fringe of the CBD (as a Park and Ride station). “The Central Coast Parking Strategy and recommendations for new parking stations will be presented to Council in February/March 2020 for endorsement. ” Dever said transport services into the city also needed to be investigated.

“We need the Erina to Somersby corridor to have better point to point bus services to support park and ride options, ” he said. “This may also sit alongside paid parking and be acceptable, but we would not accept Sydney City rates for parking. “Action needs to commence sooner rather than later and be proactive rather than the typical reactive approach with a band aid solution, which fixes nothing. ”

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2019/12/chamber-calls-for-a-new-parking-facility-to-replace-kibbleplex/

tips-to-help-you-get-hired-fast-2059661_FINAL-5b880cf8c9e77c007b210b10-5bbf84dc46e0fb0026d78608

Quick Tips That Will Help You Get Hired Fast

Applying for Every Job You Find Isn’t Always a Good Idea: Focus your search on jobs that you’re qualified for. You’ll have a better chance of getting selected for an interview. Sending out random resumes and cover letters is just going to be a waste of time. Before you start job hunting, take the time to decide what type of job you’re seeking.

Even better, come up with a target list of companies you’d like to work for and do your best to get noticed by them. Here’s how to get noticed by your dream company.

Don’t Stop Applying for Jobs While You Are Waiting to Hear Back From an Employer: Most job seekers are rejected by over 15 employers before landing a job. Learn from your mistakes and keep applying until you get the right offer. Worst case scenario, you’ll be juggling multiple job offers. That’s a good thing.

You Need a Specific Cover Letter, or Your Resume May Not Get Noticed: You only have a few seconds to impress a hiring manager enough to select you for an interview. Hiring managers want to see what you can do for the company written in the first paragraph of your cover letter. Here’s how to match your qualifications to a job, and tips for how to write a cover letter.

You Should Also Target Your Resume to the Job: It’s not just your cover letter. Your resume should be edited and tweaked, so it’s as close a match to the job as possible. Otherwise, it may not get picked up by the applicant tracking systems companies use to screen resumes or the recruiter who reviews it.

You Don’t Need to Include All Your Experience on Your Resume: Some job seekers put decades of work experience on their resumes. Unfortunately, that’s not going to impress anyone. It dates you, it’s too much information, and it may be too much experience for most job openings.

You Can Include More Than Full-Time Employment on Your Resume: If you’ve been out of work, you don’t want your resume to look like you haven’t done anything since you were laid-off. There are other things besides your employment history you can use to bolster your resume.

Dress Like a Manager or a Successful Person in Your Profession: Maybe appearances shouldn’t matter so much, but they do. The first few minutes of an interview are when you get to make that critical first impression. Be sure that you’re dressed appropriately for the type of job and company you’re applying to. Here’s appropriate interview attire for a variety of different jobs and work environments.

Be Yourself at the Interview: Rehearsed answers, fake smiles, and saying what you think the interview wants to hear instead of what you actually believe, mislead the employer. Employers want to know who they’re hiring and that’s the person they expect to show up for the first day of work.

Storytelling During a Job Interview Is an Excellent Way to Share Your Experience and Skills: One way to show the employer what you’re actually like is to tell a story. When you’re asked questions during a job interview, relay the specific skills and experience you have, as well as how you handled the situations you’re asked about. The more concrete information you provide, the more the hiring manager will know how qualified you are.

Never Say Anything Bad About a Previous Employer: One of the most common interview mistakes is badmouthing your boss or co-workers. The first thing the interviewer is going to think about is what you will say about their company when you’re moving on.

You Should Send a Thank-You Note After a Job Interview: It’s important to follow-up after a job interview. It’s a way to show your appreciation for being considered for the job. It’s also a way to reiterate your interest and share anything you neglected during the interview.

Networking Is an Essential Component of Successful Job Hunting: Most jobs are found through networking, whether it’s online or in-person. You never know who can help you find your next job unless you tell your connections that you’re looking for a job.

References Can Make a Big Difference in Getting Hired: References are important, and employers check them. Get recommendations from bosses, co-workers, clients, subordinates, and suppliers. Store them on sites like LinkedIn and share them whenever possible. If you’re worried about getting a lousy reference from your supervisor, work on getting some personal references you can add to your credentials.

It’s Acceptable to Apply for the Same Job More Than Once: You applied for your dream job, and you didn’t hear anything back from the company. Then later you see the job posted again. A “do over” is fine but be sure that you’ve carefully matched your qualifications to the job requirements in your resumes and cover letters. Also, check LinkedIn to see who you know. You might be able to get a referral the second time around. Here’s how to find contacts at a company.

Bonus Tips

Polish Your Shoes Prior to Your Interview: This one’s an extra, but, yes, hiring managers do look at your shoes. If you don’t have shoe polish, a leather or multipurpose cleaning wipe will work. It’s important to look your best from head to toe!

Pay Attention to the Details: Job hunting can feel like you’re playing a multitasking game to try to keep up. There’s so much you need to pay attention to when you want to impress a prospective employer.

Source: https://www.thebalancecareers.com/tips-to-help-you-get-hired-fast-2059661

council

Are you a community organisation, business or individual seeking funding for a project? Or are you keen to learn how to make your project more inclusive and accessible for the Central Coast community?

Council is providing a series of free workshops to improve your grant writing skills and learn how to access funding for inclusion and access enhancements.

The workshops will help community organisations increase their chance of securing much needed grant funding.

Each year Council implements a Community Grants Program to provide funding for eligible projects within community development, events, place activation, social and creative enterprises, community infrastructure and heritage.

Participants will learn:

How to strengthen their funding application and ensure it matches the criteria
Necessary skills to write a quality funding application
How to identify potential grant funding opportunities not limited to Council’s community grants program
The Grant Writing Access and Inclusion workshops will cover:

Strategies for local disability sector organisations and/or individuals with lived experience of disability that can be used to convey the intent, objectives and desired outcomes of their project idea in their application.
Strategies for community organisations and businesses who are not disability specific on how to apply for funding to make their services more accessible and inclusive.
Strategies for writing a more inclusive grant application to maximise your chances of grant success.
Register to be part of a workshop by clicking here. Places are limited.

 

Source: https://www.centralcoast.nsw.gov.au/council/news/free-community-grant-writing-workshops

forbes

Seniors from both college and high school will be setting out to look for jobs soon. However, the education system doesn’t typically leave students ready to face the working world.

Landing a job in spring would be the ideal outcome, but graduates may not really be sure how to get employed. The critical aspect of landing a job, regardless of whether you’re leaving high school or college, is being prepared. You should have a firm grasp of what kind of a job you’re looking for and find out what the requirements for that position are.

To help, 13 experts from Forbes Human Resources Council share their insight into what high school and college grads should be doing to land a job in spring, and why those elements are of such importance.

1. Network And Practice Interviewing

Graduating can be an exciting and stressful time for seniors. It can be easy to forget the basics of job searching — networking and interviews. Remember to keep your contacts as you collaborate on projects or work with teachers for possible future letters of recommendation or job referrals. Also, practice interviewing with friends or teachers to help you be prepared for when the time comes. – Kelly Loudermilk, BuildHR, Inc.

2. Know What You’re Passionate About

Really putting thought into what they are passionate about is important in identifying the right job or career. College and high school counselors can assist with personality profiles, but talking with friends and family about what you are good at and drawn to will also help. My advice: try things! Don’t wait until you are sure. Take chances and try various options. – Diane Strohfus, Betterworks.com

3. Learn To Expand Your Personal Boundaries

The ability to set appropriate boundaries rises as a key marker of psychological well-being because we’re constantly being pulled in multiple directions. The challenge for young people is that moving into work life requires shifting personal boundaries to include the needs/demands of colleagues and team. This is a key factor for success. – Leeno Karumanchery, PhD, MESH/Diversity

4. Do Your Leg Work

Research a few companies you’re interested in and contact their HR to see if they have short-term intern programs or job shadow days. Get your foot in the door by showing eagerness to take a paid or unpaid opportunity to work in your field of interest. Potential employers are impressed by candidates that are proactive and enthusiastic. The experience will also help build your resume. – Regina Romeo, CPS HR Consulting

5. Identify Company Values You Can Get Behind

Job vacancies are at an all-time low and the fight for top talent is on! You will have a plethora of employment options. Start now to identify five to 10 companies that enact values that resonate with you. Do you value trust, hard work, efficiency? Find companies that value the same and their management philosophy will be well-aligned with your needs. Share this during the interview process to impress. – Christine Wzorek, White Label Advisors

6. Find A Mentor And Create A Plan

It can be difficult figuring out your next steps in this exciting time of your life. It’s important to set yourself up for success by preparing in advance. Network as early as possible and start planting the seed in your areas of interest with those you meet. Find a mentor already in the workforce, and create a plan for yourself with actionable steps to reach your goal by graduation. – Charles Ashworth, Copper

7. Identify What Makes You Unique

Help employers understand why you stand out from the crowd by focusing on accomplishments or attributes that make you unique and of which you are exceptionally proud. Be willing to take risks and put yourself out there. If employers aren’t connecting with who you are, those are not employers with whom you want to align yourself. You have a right to find an employer who values you! – Sherrie Suski, Tricon American Homes

8. Build Your Professional Brand

It is important that college seniors be aware of how to brand themselves in a professional manner and be aware of how they act and speak to their new environment. This may mean a social media audit, the way we dress to an interview, the way we conduct ourselves at a networking event. Branding is also about how I speak and what I speak. All the lingo of school should be left in school. – Tasniem Titus, Dentsply Sirona

9. Globalize Your Thoughts And Actions

Today’s workforce is global and multicultural. High school and college seniors can get a head start by participating in global projects and study-abroad opportunities or simply seeking a mentor globally. By demonstrating global thoughts and actions, the seniors can create a clear differentiation and announce their readiness to be successful leaders of the future. – Vineet Gambhir, Summit Partners

10. Clean Up Your Social Media Accounts

Recent graduates, go clean out your social media closet! You can bet that employers are looking at this, and if your social media looks like that of half the young people I know, it’s in dire need of an overhaul. Hide the accounts you don’t want people to see, delete embarrassing photos, get rid of any radical commentary and generally look like someone an adult wouldn’t mind employing. – Tracy Cote, Genesys

11. Make Your Resume Real-World Ready

It’s critical that employers can envision candidates as successful employees. Students with relevant internship experiences stand out for me. Employers can understand that you needed income, but if all you’ve got on your resume is bartending and babysitting, it’s harder for them to understand how you’ll contribute in their environment. – Joyce Maroney, Kronos Incorporated

12. Close Your Skills Gap

Whether it’s high school or college, students should prepare themselves for graduation by either volunteering or taking internships during holidays and vacation periods to bridge the gap between formal education and workplace needs. Students who demonstrate the skills and outcomes for which employers are looking will certainly stand out once they are ready to enter the workforce in any season. – Dr. Timothy J. Giardino, Cantata Health & Meta Healthcare IT Solutions

13. Improve Your Communication

Use every opportunity to practice your communication skills. About 70% of what we do in business relates to written and oral communication. Speak up in class every opportunity you have. Seek out chances to give oral presentations in front of peers. With experience, your skills will only improve so the key is seizing every opportunity you have to become a better communicator. – Heide Abelli, Skillsoft

Source: https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbeshumanresourcescouncil/2019/11/25/getting-ready-to-join-the-workforce-13-tips-for-high-school-and-college-seniors/#2d71f60234a8

Tarragal-Glenn-housing-project

Central Coast Council has approved a new $19.5M four-storey building housing 54 assisted living apartments at Erina’s Tarragal Glen Retirement Village, despite concerns raised by the adjacent medical practice.

The project will also see a two-storey maintenance/staff building erected on the site at 6 Tarragal Glen Ave. Dr Natalie Cordowiner, from the Your Family Doctors practice in Terrigal Dr, told councillors at a public forum prior to the November 11 meeting that the business had concerns over possible disruptions, with eight power disruptions this year already having disrupted vaccine storage.

A submission from the practice said it had no concerns over the larger building, but feared that the ancillary building would be overlooked in the larger part of the Development Application.

“This is a small area in which the ‘maintenance area’ will be sandwiched between our property and the currently being built KFC premises, ” the submission said. “It will overlook the fence at the rear of our property at which there are three consulting rooms, in which patients are seen, that will be affected.

“This will affect privacy as there are proposed secondary story windows on the new building. “In addition, there will be some shadowing and effect on the sun aspect of our building … (and) there will be inevitable disruption to our business during this build as our patients exit via our right of way through to Tarragal Glen Ave cul-de-sac. ”

The practice was also concerned about possible damage to its own building and noise and disruption to power or internet during the build. Councillor Louise Greenaway said she empathised with the medical practice but the development had the right to go ahead and she was sure they would work with the Centre to alleviate any concerns.

Councillors Jeff Sundstrom and Chris Holstein also supported the motion and spoke about conditions of consent which addressed the medical practice’s concerns. Approval was unanimous.

 

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2019/11/four-storey-building-housing-54-assisted-living-apartments-approved/

jobactive

Use this guide to build your job application skills and help you get your next job.

Qualifications

Employers will check your qualifications match the job they are hiring for. The types of things they look for include:

  • education level
  • certificates
  • licences
  • demonstrated industry or job experience

There are ways for you to boost your qualifications. You can contact your employment services provider or check out myskills to learn more about the jobs and qualifications in demand and how to get them.

Experience

For some jobs, your level of experience is very important. An employer might not have the resources or time to train you and will need you to hit the ground running.

When you apply for a job take a good look at what the employer is asking for in the job ad. Do you meet the minimum experience level needed? Have you done that type of work before?

On your resume and in your interview you have to clearly outline how your experience matches the job so the employer knows you have what they need.

Get details about the skills different jobs need and how to get them at the find a job blog

Interview

Your job interview is normally the first time an employer meets you. First impressions matter. You have to be prepared, dressed properly and show enthusiasm.

To boost your interview skills, practice talking about your work history and your achievements with someone before your next interview. You can also search for practice interview questions on the internet.

You can get more tips to improve your interview skills from your employment services provider or check out Job Jumpstart.

Suitability

The job market is competitive. Employers get a lot of applications from a lot of great candidates. Sometimes a different person is a better fit for the job you applied for.

Don’t be disheartened. It does not mean you are not right for another job. Pay attention to any feedback you get from employers, your provider and other people you trust. A small change to your resume, application or the way you present yourself at interviews could make the difference next time.

Job Jumpstart has heaps of tips to help you boost your chances at getting a job.

Attitude

It can take time to build experience and qualifications. Getting the right attitude is something you can do right now.

Employers need to know you want the job. You communicate your enthusiasm by:

  • showing interest in the job and the person interviewing you
  • being friendly
  • making good eye contact
  • being prepared
  • having good posture and personal presentation

Sometimes nerves can get in the way of showing your great attitude. Before your next interview, practice answering questions with a friend, your provider or someone you trust.

Appearance

Face to face customer service is common in lots of jobs, so what you wear and how you present yourself at an interview is important.

If you look messy or you don’t smell great, an employer won’t feel comfortable letting you represent their business. Before you go to an interview make sure you:

  • shower
  • shave or tidy up your facial hair
  • brush your teeth and hair
  • put on deodorant
  • wash and iron your clothes

Little details make a big difference. We’ve got some videos that can help you figure out what to wear to an interview.

Resume

Employers take about six seconds to decide if they want to keep reading your resume. If the first thing they see is a spelling error they will not keep reading.

Here are some things you can do to improve your resume:

  • Ask someone to proof read for spelling and grammar mistakes.
  • Make sure it is up to date with your latest work and education experience.
  • Double check your contact details are correct.
  • Check your format – is your resume set out in a way that makes it easy to read?
  • Tailor your resume to the job you are applying for.

You can get more tips from your employment services provider, or check out our job search tips to see how to make your resume and cover letter great.

 

Source: https://jobsearch.gov.au/jobseeker-info/guide-to-build-job-application-skills

ourimbah

The Ourimbah Land Use Strategy and Masterplan has been sent back to the drawing board, because Central Coast Mayor, Lisa Matthews, says “we haven’t got it right yet”.

Ourimbah residents packed Gosford Chambers for the Central Coast Council meeting on October 28, and speakers on their behalf gave comprehensive presentations against the Masterplan.

They say the Masterplan is poorly planned, prerequisite planning is not finalised, community consultation is lacking, feedback and concerns have been ignored, building height and yield bonuses plus parking concessions are unacceptable, bushfire and flooding issues are not addressed and Ourimbah’s character, history and natural beauty is not retained.

Ourimbah Region Residents’ Association (ORRA) is calling for an independent review. “It is flawed and will destroy the village”, says resident Greg McGill, who addressed the meeting. “The key to the whole Masterplan is the extension of Jacques St to the north. “Council says it will not acquire properties but will let development occur as properties are sold and developers choose to develop, this is absurd.

“The whole concept is flawed. “The ink isn’t yet dry on our submissions to the draft Urban Spatial Plan … those submissions should be given a fair hearing. “We know the community is strongly opposed to the plan for Ourimbah. ” McGill said Council had sought submissions from the community but then totally ignored them and that no consideration had been given to existing residents, only to new development and developers. He said planning officers had rejected requests for a public meeting and invitations to attend the ORRA meetings.

“With regards to parking and shops, the devil’s in the detail here, ” McGill said “There’s no specific information about which sites have relaxed parking requirements and there’s no mention about the future of the existing shops that need highway exposure to survive. “Are they going to be demolished or allowed to continue?

“The Masterplan does not include any bushfire maps or proper risk evaluation for several areas, including the village centre. “Council says the character and natural beauty will be preserved but obviously, again, not true. “Please send this illconceived plan back to council staff to reevaluate and prepare a realistic plan. ” Brian Davies also spoke at the meeting against the Masterplan, citing a serious flooding problem not addressed.

“The draft Ourimbah Creek flood plan says that the rail facility (at Kangy Angy) will have no impact on floods but we have photos from residents who live in that area showing floods across that land and testimony to show that the site does flood now, especially since it’s had hundreds of thousands of cubic metres of fill put on the site.

“There are concerns that the whole of Ourimbah basin is going to be badly impacted by the damming of the channel that the floods go through. “Council’s flood plan as it currently stands shows the whole of that Kangy Angy site as a flood storage and so, with the fill on it now, that water has to go somewhere else and we’re concerned it will back up into Ourimbah Creek and back up Burns Rd and effectively back up to the university, ” Davies said.

Davies’ comments prompted further debate later in the meeting on another matter before Council, the report on Wyong River and Ourimbah Creek Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan, and ultimately those plans were also put on hold for further investigation in order to align them with the Ourimbah Masterplan. (See separate article)

The aim of the Masterplan is to present a 20-year vision for growth while protecting the area’s unique character and sensitive setting, yet it has been met with continuing opposition including a petition organised by The Entrance MP, David Mehan.

He told NSW Parliament in September that he was “surprised” that Council’s Masterplan for the region did not give due regard to the preservation of the heritage of the area and the opportunities for tourism. “Instead, Council’s Masterplan promotes higher density for the area, including four storey buildings throughout the Ourimbah village precinct where there are heritage dwellings, ” he said.

He told Parliament that Council needed to revisit the masterplan because there was an opportunity to preserve the heritage and “do something good for the Coast”. Mayor, Lisa Matthews, told councillors that during a meeting that day “the State Member thought we were on the right track but still has some concerns”. The Mayor gained unanimous support for her Motion to defer adoption of the Masterplan.

“It is clear that the community is seeking more input and for us to revisit some of the issues that they have presented to us”, she said. Council will now review the plan and its correlation to the draft Urban Spatial Plan, the Local Strategic Planning Statement and the Ourimbah Creek Flood Plan.

The history of this plan goes back to 2011 when the former Wyong Council entered into an agreement with the University of Newcastle and TAFE NSW to prepare a masterplan for the future growth of Ourimbah with the view of developing “the town centre into an education, training, research and recreational precinct in order to deliver significant economic and social benefits to the region”.

The Ourimbah Land Use Strategy and Masterplan was a key planning project in the Wyong Shire Strategic Plan 2014-15. A first version of the plan went public in 2016 and following many submissions, the document was significantly revised and the draft final plan went on public exhibition earlier in 2019.

There were 140 formal submissions and about 22,000 online visits through social media or website, with the most common concerns being the town centre heritage and character, building heights, retail, traffic, parking as well as hazards such as bushfire, flood and biodiversity.

Over the years, ORRA has successfully battled various plans for out-ofcharacter developments, most notably, a four storey, 101 room boarding house in 2013 which met with two Land and Environment Court cases and the developer losing on both counts.

 

 

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2019/11/ourimbah-land-use-strategy-back-to-drawing-board/

fya

Ok team, Listen here. There is something really important we need to chat about. The Foundation for Young Australians (that’s us) released a new report that analysed 4.2 million job ads from the past 3 years and have sussed out what skills are most wanted by employers.
The great news is, you probably already have a lot of them, you just might not realise it.

The report, titled New Basics, is the latest in our New Work Order series that looks at the critical skills we all need to succeed in the changing world of work.

We can all agree that this kind of BIG DATA is a BIG DEAL so we’re going to break it down for you so you can make your next job application really stand out.

Here’s the skinny on which skills had the biggest increase in demand over the past 3 years:

Digital literacy is up by 212%
Creativity is up by 65%
Critical thinking is up by 158%
Presentation skills are up by 23%
Not only is the demand for these skills increasing, but jobs that want people with these skills are offering more cash as well. So if you want fat stacks, you’re going to need to know how to do these things.

When compared with similar jobs that don’t request these specific skills

Jobs that ask for presentation skills will score you an extra $8,853 / year
Jobs that ask for digital literacy will hand over an extra $8,648 / year
Jobs that request problem solving will cough up an extra $7,745 / year
Long story short, it’s pretty clear that learning these skills is well worth your time.

What this means in reality is that young people can no longer only rely on technical skills they might have studied for (think engineering, architecture, accounting, medicine) but they also need to be armed with a toolkit of what we call ‘enterprise skills’ to get the best jobs.

The great news for you is that you have most likely already developed and demonstrated these enterprise skills, you just need to be able to package them up in a way that makes it clear to future employers that you’ve got what it takes to get the job done.

When you’re working on your next job application or in an interview, here are some hot tips for selling your enterprise skill set:

Digital Literacy – demand up by 212%

The great news about this one is that a lot of young people already know a lot about this.

We know what’s #trending and have sussed out that virus is bad and viral is good. We have first hand experience of what might make one app great and another really clunky.

To talk about this skill in your resume you might want to mention if you run your own Instagram account, if you’ve ever promoted an event online, built a website or if you’ve used excel to input data about any given thing (best hot chips in your city, how much homework you need to do, budgeting etc).

Creativity – demand up by 65%

Lots of people are probably reading this one and thinking ‘But I’m not creative’. Dear friends, that is simply not true. We have all done creative things, trust me.

If you’ve ever had to present an assignment in a visual way? That’s creative. Ever built a Power Point presentation or video? That’s creative. Ever faceswapped on Snapchat with a couch cushion? That’s v creative (you weirdo).

You might present yourself creatively in the way you dress, the music you listen to or your Tumblr layout.

Critical thinking – up by 158%

This one sounds way fancier than it is. It is probably something you do all the time without realising.

If you’ve ever thought about how something could function better or more efficiently in your workplace or school, that’s critical thinking.

If you’ve ever been able to look at an issue in the media and see a different side of the story, that’s critical thinking.

If you’ve ever been able to reflect on a party you’ve thrown and realised that you definitely didn’t nail the good cheese to cracker ratio, then you’re a critical thinker.

Presentation skills – up by 23%

This one is kind of obvious. By nature of attending school at some stage you’ve probably had to present in front of groups.

If you can’t think of something formal you might think of a time you trained someone new at your casual job or when you inspired your sports team with a killer half-time rev up speech. It could even be when you addressed a group while planning a school assignment. Any time you’ve communicated clearly, you’ve presented!

Wouldn’t it be nice to learn about these employable skills in school?

Now, while we think it’s super important that you know how to sell yourself and your enterprise skills, we don’t think it’s only up you.

We think that the results of this report speak pretty loud and clear and that enterprise skills like digital literacy, critical thinking and project management need to be taught in schools. From primary school, and all the way through to uni.

We’re also keen to see young people properly exposed to the job skills they’ll need; so we’re talking great work experience placements and immersive on job learning.

If you’re thinking that it would have been nice to learn a little more about these skills in the classroom, maybe show your teacher this article? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

 

 

 

Source: https://www.fya.org.au/2016/04/20/here-are-the-skills-you-will-need-to-succeed-and-earn-big-buckaroos/?gclid=CjwKCAiA5JnuBRA-EiwA-0ggPQQ9EqVdCu88ILsEoSLhoOTAivgV3qUEIZ_3oTMbFoSA2JDVAFjdshoC5_IQAvD_BwE

wgosford

The West Gosford Shopping Centre is set to be completely revitalised, with a Development Application (DA) on public exhibition until October 31 outlining a $2.23M revamp of the site.

Bought by Mintus Properties Pty Ltd for a reported $23M earlier in 2019, the shopping centre has languished in recent years, with numerous tenants shutting their doors. But all that is about to change, with the DA lodged with Central Coast Council outlining a three stage redevelopment which will see major alterations to existing buildings and the addition of a childcare centre and a fast food outlet.

Stage one would see the fast food outlet constructed, with 50 indoor seats and a drivethrough, catering for 16 cars. Stage two would see alterations, including demolition of existing walls and fit-outs on the first floor, converting existing office space to an 81 place childcare centre•and a gym. Stage three would see major renovations to the ground level, including the demolition of the existing tavern, resheeting and reconfiguration of the carpark, providing four more parking spaces than at present, making a total of 209, and the introduction of new shade sails.

There would be new car entry points, a play area and forecourt refurbishment with outdoor seating and feature trees. A new mall and shopfront to the Coles supermarket entry would see a pedestrian arcade from Brisbane Water Dve, including a feature ceiling•and upgrades to building facades.

The amenities are also set for an upgrade and there will be landscaping along the boundaries. Documents lodged with the application say it aims to provide a “strong identity” for the Coles supermarket and a significant improvement to the activation of this part of the centre. It also aims to improve access, amenity and accessibility, paving the way for a “strong centre identity”.

But not everyone is happy with the project, with more than 30 submissions already received, many of them critical of the plan to include the fast food outlet. With an outlet of the same fast food chain already located on the Central Coast Hwy at West Gosford, objections have been raised to the extra traffic and loss of amenity that the new one could create. Various submissions call instead for a family restaurant alternative or an up market delicatessen.

 

 

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2019/11/west-gosford-shopping-centre-to-be-completely-revitalised/

resume

If your resume is missing just one keyword, it could be the difference between getting an interview or not. How do you know what the keyword is? Keep reading.

We know looking for a job is hard. Getting a job is even harder. There’s eight people out of work for every job that’s advertised. Depending on the job, there’s often 25-200 people applying for the same job as you.

When you apply for a job, your resume ends up in a stack of other resumes on the desk of the person looking to hire you.

How to spot keywords in a job ad

It’s hard to impress your future boss with a piece of paper. But, there is a way to get the edge over the other people in the stack. The secret is finding out what the boss is looking for – the keywords – and make sure you put those in the resume. Take a look at this job ad:


At first glance, you may think the business is looking for someone with experience with truck tyres. Keep reading and you’ll see they want someone who can work in a fast paced environment. They need you to be physically fit and to be able to confidently use hand tools. They also want you to have a reliable vehicle and to live locally.

How to use keywords in your resume

The words I have put in bold are your keywords. As simple as it sounds, put these exact words in your resume, exactly as they are in the job ad and your resume will stand out. It ticks all the boxes the business is looking for and you are more likely to get an interview – and more likely to get the job.

Why are keywords more important than ever?

More and more, a computer will read your resume first. Its name is Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS). A computer program will scan your resume for keywords. If you have the right keywords in your resume, you’re more likely to get to the top of the pile.

The only way to impress a robot is to do exactly what it wants you to do. You could have all the right experience. You could have all the right skills. Unless you write them in the same way the robot is looking for, it could shunt you to the bottom of the pack.

All the more reason to scan job ads for keywords and customise your resume with those exact keywords. The more you do it, the better you get. You need to do this for every job you apply for.

Practice right now! Go to jobactive.gov.au, search for a job that’s right for you and highlight the key words. It’s easy once you know how.

 

Source: https://findajob.blog/2019/08/12/is-your-resume-missing-the-keyword-to-unlock-a-job/

Aged care

The sudden closure of two aged care facilities on the New South Wales Central Coast has shocked a large group of vulnerable older residents and their families and renewed concerns about the financial viability of Australia’s private aged care sector.

Key points:

  • The operators of two NSW aged care homes say they do not have the resources to maintain a high standard of care
  • Advocates are calling for reform in the sector, saying the care-for-profit model does not work
  • Residents and their families have been given little more than a month to make new arrangements

By the end of the month, one of the region’s most established homes, the Henry Kendall aged care facility at Wyoming, along with a dementia unit at The Orchards in Lisarow will both close their doors, affecting more than 80 people.

The private operators of each facility have cited financial reasons for the closures as well as the ongoing impact of the Royal Commission into Aged Care.

In correspondence with one affected family, The Orchards operator, the Astoria Group, outlined why its dementia ward will shut down on October 30.

“The new quality standards, the royal commission, staff education and resourcing, and research and advice received with regards to what a well-designed dementia environment looks like,” it said.

“For us to be able to provide this in to the future at the high standard that we set for ourselves, we just don’t have the resources to be able to do that.”

Down the road in Wyoming, operator Allity defended its decision to close the Henry Kendall facility after 34 years because it could no longer be “modified extensively enough to meet the accommodation needs and expectations of residents”.

About $2 million was recently spent on improvements to the aged care home, which has been sanctioned for the past six months over a series of non-compliances.

Five weeks’ notice for five-year resident
Residents from both facilities were given five weeks notice to find and move into alternative accommodation with new carers, neighbours and routines.

Leanne Fitzroy’s 85-year-old mother, Shirley Keenan, suffers from dementia and has been living in The Orchards’ Kumquat dementia ward for the past five years.

Ms Fitzroy said getting news of its unexpected closure was devastating.

“I think it’s the hardest thing that a child can do is to put their parent into an aged care facility and when you do, you do it with trust that you think that this facility is going to look after you, and certainly that is what they indicate they’re going to do at the time,” she said.

“They will bend over backwards to get your money through the door and tell you how wonderful they are but they don’t tell you, ‘oh well we may close down a ward’.

“Five years ago I had to sell my mother’s house and pay a bond to move her into this facility.

“I set it up believing that was going to look after her … I don’t know what people do who can’t make other arrangements.

“It has been so distressing.”

Traumatic for older people
Independent aged care advocacy group Aged Care Crisis said closing homes and forcing residents to find new accommodation can have serious effects on the elderly.

“These closures have really had a detrimental consequence for frail vulnerable people especially those with dementia or at the end of their lives,” spokeswoman Linda Salterelli said.

“Being forced to transfer homes can be quite disorientating and very traumatic at a time when stability and consistency can be really important.”

The Central Coast Federal Member for Dobell and Shadow Assistant Minister for Carers Emma McBride said the sector was being starved of resources.

“We have an ageing population on the Central Coast, and we also have a shortage of particularly dementia specific care,” Ms McBride said.

“This is a crisis in our community and I don’t think the government properly recognises it.

“I don’t think they … properly understood the nature or the scale of the problem in regional centres.”

Ms Salterelli said the sector needs a complete overhaul.

“I think we really need to bring back community responsibility in aged care,” she said.

“I think we’ve just gone too far down the road of making it into a profitable business and I think at the end of the day caring for our loved ones is a community responsibility, and that is being eroded and removed.”

 

Source: https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-10-24/central-coast-aged-care-closures/11634788

Quartz

There’s a common piece of career advice that will stall your career if you’re not careful. It often comes from a well-meaning person—a friend, family member, or close mentor who wants the best for your career:

In order to secure your job and position yourself for bigger, better roles, you need to “make yourself indispensable.”

In reality, making yourself indispensable is the best way to keep yourself where you are in your job, rather than advancing.

When you’re so amazing in that one role that most people can’t imagine you doing anything else, they won’t want you to do anything else. Your manager relies on you so much that they won’t part with you, and you’re at risk of being pigeonholed.

I remember being in a management discussion about how we could backfill a role that was about to be open. Another manager suggested we promote Steven, but his boss jumped in and said, “Don’t touch Steven—I need him right where he is!”

None of us dared suggest Steven for other roles after that. Steven was about to be stuck in his role for a while without knowing it. One day he would look back and wonder how he went from being a star to being passed over for better roles.

This effect is often made worse by another piece of well-meaning advice: “You’re doing a great job, just keep doing what you’re doing”. This is what managers often say when they are too nice (or too lazy) to come up with feedback that will help you develop.

While that feels reassuring and can even make sense in the next quarter or two, it does nothing to prepare you for the next level. How can you grow if you don’t know how to change? If your boss is telling you that every year—to stay where you are, just keep doing what you’re doing—then it’s time to get some proper feedback to help you move forward (or a new boss!).
Could that be happening to you right now?

How to avoid the “indispensable” trap

So, how do you perform highly without getting caught in the workplace equivalent of Groundhog Day? And how do you free yourself if you’re already in the trap?

The key is to be indispensable for what you can become, and not for what you currently do. Here are four ways to do that.

Help others see you in a different light. Show people that there’s more than one dimension to your capabilities. So if they mostly see you doing “behind-the-scenes” research, invite them to a meeting where you’re “on stage” presenting. Take on new challenges. Let others know you have the interest and potential to do more. How could you demonstrate you can learn and grow beyond your current role?

See yourself in a different light. The longer you stay in the comfort zone of the role where you’re indispensable, the harder it will be to envision yourself doing something else. And that will color your behavior. Instead, challenge yourself to see yourself in a different light. Look for opportunities where you can learn, stretch, and develop new capabilities. What does You 2.0 look, feel, and sound like?

Prepare for the next level. The best way to do this is to continually invest in yourself and your development. Make time to learn new things. Identify the experiences and skills you want to have. Talk to others about what it takes and the things they wished they’d done to prepare themselves. Then go explore how you can do those things. What would prepare you for the next level in your career.

Make yourself moveable. Building a bench of talent beneath you is the best way to ensure that senior managers feel comfortable moving you to the next level position you aspire to. Remember, you don’t want to end up like indispensable Steven. Who could step into your role when you move up? If you can create your own backfill, managers won’t feel as anxious promoting you.

Don’t risk stalling your career by being so indispensable in your current role that you can’t move onward and upward when you want to. Be known for being indispensable for your potential, not your performance.

 

Source: https://qz.com/work/1721147/why-making-yourself-indispensable-is-terrible-career-advice/

 

CC 201019

The old Kibbleplex building in the heart of Gosford will be transformed into a $345.4M five tower residential and retail development within 10 years if the Lederer Group is successful with its latest Development Application, lodged with the State Planning Department for consideration as a State Significant Development.

The Lederer Group has developed a masterplan for the site, which would be developed in six stages, with the DA for the first stage, which involves site and vegetation clearing at a cost of $3.6M, on exhibition until November 7.

The plan is a revisited and slim-lined version of Lederer’s initial 2016 Gosford Alive project, which involved redevelopment of the Kibbleplex site and the Imperial Centre and was withdrawn in March 2018, with planning restrictions for the CBD in a state of flux.

In October 2018, planning for the site recommenced, with the core project team of Lederer (proponent), Buchan Group (architect) and Mecone (planning) considering a range of options for the Kibbleplex site.

The preferred option would see five residential towers housing more than 700 apartments sited above and behind layered retail podiums fronting Kibble Park, providing a gradual transition from the park to the ridgeline behind Albany St North.

The towers would range from 20-30 storeys and would be topped by elevated gardens. DAs for the construction of the towers themselves will be lodged in increments following clearing of the site. Documentation lodged with the DA estimates that the project will provide 500 direct and indirect jobs.

Basement and above-ground carparks would provide around 1,014 parking spaces with access points in William St, Donnison St and Albany St North. The masterplan says the project aims to: support the growth of the Gosford CBD; help meet the region’s projected housing demand of 41,500 additional dwellings by 2036; and help create a more attractive and safer city centre.

Great care has been taken to prevent overshadowing of Kibble Park in the design process, with at least 60 per cent of the park to receive four hours of direct sunlight between 9am and 3pm on the winter solstice.

 

 

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2019/10/kibbleplex-to-be-demolished-as-stage-1-of-345m-development/


linkedin

Long gone are the days where you’d stay in one job for life: it’s now the norm to jump between jobs and even careers every few years.

LinkedIn research shows 70 per cent of Australians would consider a career change, while two in five Aussies have worked in two different industries over the last five years.

And if you’re looking for that job change, a clean, up-to-date LinkedIn profile could be the difference between being shortlisted or being overlooked entirely.

Speaking to Yahoo Finance, LinkedIn Australia’s career expert Shiva Kumar revealed the top tips to take your profile to the next level and make the most of the professional networking website.

“First and foremost, you have to get the basics right,” he said. Make sure your profile has these two non-negotiable must-haves ticked:

A professional photo of yourself; and

Your current job title and industry.

“These are all simple but important aspects that help to tell a compelling story about who you are as a potential job candidate.”

And before you even begin your hunt, ensure that the ‘Open to opportunity’ setting of your LinkedIn profile is switched on to ensure recruiters get the message you’re open to opportunities, Kumar advised.

LinkedIn Australia career expert’s top tips for a killer profile

1. Say where you’re based

“Recruiters rely on location information to find candidates,” Kumar said. “You’ll stand out by as much as 23 times more if you include the city you’re based in in your profile.

“Often times recruiters will use advanced search based on location, so the more details you have the more likely you will be found and connected to your next opportunity.”

2. Have your elevator pitch ready

If you’re wanting to attract and capture the attention of recruiters or potential bosses, say a few words about yourself and what you do to make yourself memorable.

“Adding a summary of 40 words or more, makes your profile more likely to turn up in a future employer’s search,” Kumar said.

“A good tip is to ensure your summary includes keywords featured in desirable job descriptions for your field.”

3. Let your skills do the talking

Job titles will vary from organisation to organisation, so it’s a little tough to know what to search for when you’re job hunting.

“By listing all of your skills on your profile you are more likely to attract recruiters and show up in the right talent searches,” said Kumar.

4. Avoid buzzwords such as ‘motivated’

How much have you stumbled across the profile of someone who claimed to be an “influencer” or an “entrepreneur” or “enthusiastic” or a “team player”?

Avoid overused yet less valued words like the plague if they’re not actually adding anything to your profile – recruiters see the same descriptors in every profile day in day out.

“What they really want is to understand your capability for a certain role,” said Kumar.

“Let your experience do the talking; show who you are, don’t tell. Add visual examples of the work that you did.”

5. Showcase your interests

An active LinkedIn profile can speak volumes for you: share content that you enjoy like an interesting video or a thoughtful news story, or even a particularly impressive presentation through regular updates, said Kumar.

“With as little as a sentence, updates help get you noticed, and they are a great way to interact with and engage your professional network in conversations.”

Tick all these boxes – and don’t forget to set up job alerts – and you’ll be in good stead to catch the recruiter’s attention, Kumar said.

 

 

Source: https://au.finance.yahoo.com/news/linkedin-australia-career-expert-top-profile-tips-200053689.html

ING

An $11 million ING bank call centre has been approved for Wyong, with the potential to house 600 staff.

Central Coast Council has voted in favour of the four-storey development at 4 Dulmison St, north of the Pacific Hwy, opposite the Wyong Golf Club.

The land is currently occupied by a car park, as well as the North Grounds Cafe.

The creation of jobs and attraction of high-profile business to Wyong was the clincher for approval, despite the building exceeding height limit restrictions by 4.1 metres.

ING will relocate the bank’s 350 staff from the existing ING operations in the Tuggerah Business Park, while making room for an extra 250 staff at the premises.

ADW Johnson senior planner Adam Crampton told councillors ING had outgrown the Tuggerah premises it has been based at since 2002.

He said the bank was attracted to the Wyong site due to its space for carparking and the nature of the vertical building was to keep staff close together and ensure tight security.

“They are choosing to remain on the Central Coast providing employment for up to 600 people, an investment of $11 million with an extremely long lease,” he said.

Councillor Kyle MacGregor said the development “is in the public interest” however there needed to be a traffic management plan for the area.

“It’s important that we are attracting high quality businesses, but it is important we are looking at traffic concerns,” he said.

Councillor Greg Best said approving the ING development would ensure council could “land these economic giants”.

The applicant, known as Dulmison Ave Pty Ltd, indicated public art would soften the impact of the height and tell the industrial story behind North Wyong.

The ING office and call centre is intended to operate 24-hours a day in three shifts.

 

Source: https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/central-coast/ing-call-centre-to-house-600-staff-approved-for-wyong/news-story/cd281a2e94bf6a6ede166aa81d6810a6?fbclid=IwAR3PfdSCO4HYINoMa9vewk3C2Bkzy57fLioJMhTHx_QUAJoQLaX1kOiZ5cs

CC 06.10.19

Central Coast Council has placed its draft Cultural Plan 2020-2025 on exhibition, for the community to have their say.

The draft Cultural Plan supports the Central Coast achieving its potential as a creative destination and provides opportunities for people of all ages, backgrounds and abilities to participate in, and contribute to, the cultural life of the Central Coast.

Council’s Director Connected Communities, Julie Vaughan said that creativity and cultural identity was a large and important part of our region.

“A thriving arts and cultural sector is important for the health and wellbeing of our community and for regional economic development,” Ms Vaughan said.

“The draft Plan is based on the vision of building on our creative strengths across our community and establishing our region as a hub for the wider creative sector.

“Creativity is a major part of who we are on the Central Coast. The draft Plan will assist us with building a welcoming and lively region to showcase our diverse and inclusive cultural identity.

“This includes the development of dedicated locations to host the creation and showcasing of rich artistic offerings and the telling of the stories of our past and present.”

Mayor Lisa Matthews is calling on residents from across the Central Coast to add their voice to the discussion and help shape the Plan.

“Over many years Council and the community have made a considerable investment in arts and cultural development,” Mayor Matthews said.

“This Plan builds on this substantial platform and provides a framework for further investment around a shared vision.

“It outlines the direction for a vibrant, creative, welcoming community brimming with cultural vitality.

“I encourage everyone to contribute.”

The draft Cultural Plan is available for comment before 15 November 2019.

The community is also invited to register for information sessions on Wednesday 30 October at The Erina Centre and Thursday 31 October at The Art House.

To have your say and to register for an information session visit yourvoiceourcoast.com

 

Source: https://www.centralcoast.nsw.gov.au/council/news/media-releases/central-coast-cultural-plan-draft-on-exhibition

1

We’re all looking for ways to improve ourselves—at least that’s what the thriving $10 billion self-help industry seems to imply.

But as popular and alluring as the principles of personal development may be, many of us still have only a fuzzy understanding of it. Even fuzzier: How to turn personal growth into professional gains.

At the same time, there’s an undeniable overlap between the two—after all, our personal strengths and weaknesses affect us at work, too. And there are ways in which growing personally and working on ourselves can make us more effective at work.

If that still feels a little murky, we get it. Read on to learn exactly what personal growth is and get concrete ways to leverage it in your career.

What Is Personal Growth Anyway?
Personal growth or development is difficult to define, in part because it’s, well, personal. Broadly speaking, personal development is an effort to improve yourself, the outcomes in your life, or how you experience life, explains Sumayya Essack, a career-change coach and founder and owner of Curate the Future.

“Personal growth is the process of growing stronger, more confident, and more effective as a person and an agent of change for your own life,” says Kathy Caprino, a career and personal growth coach. More specifically, it relates to “how you see and perceive yourself, interact with others, engage with the world, and envision your future and your possibilities.”

It affects you in both concrete and more abstract ways, including emotional regulation, communication abilities, well-defined boundaries, decision-making, and personal satisfaction and positivity.
Where Personal and Professional Development Meet

At first glance, personal growth can seem a little vague compared to professional development goals. “Career growth tends to focus on tangible performance-related goals, such as raises [and] promotions,” Essack explains. It may also emphasize hard skills, which depending on your field could include things like data analysis or proficiency in a certain language or type of software.

However, if you think of personal and professional growth as two circles of a Venn diagram, there’s a healthy overlap between them. “Your career success and enjoyment of your career aren’t just the result of domain-related skills and knowledge. It’s also a result of what you bring to the table as a person,” Essack says.

Things we think of as soft skills—such as communication style, self-motivation, and how you relate to other people—fall into the area of overlap. And these skills greatly impact our ability to get things done at work. Developing them can help you become more effective in your career, and maybe even nab a promotion.

4 Personal Development Goals That Can Help You Get Ahead at Work
Even if you’re sold on the benefits of personal growth for your career—where do you start? In large part, it’s up to you.

“At the root of all personal development is becoming aware of what’s happening in your own mind and becoming aware of how the thoughts you’re thinking affect your emotions, behaviors, and results,” Essack says. If you can identify a result you’re unhappy with or, conversely, one you want to achieve, you can work backwards from there to determine the underlying thoughts, emotions, and behaviors you should address to make the change you desire.

For example, are you constantly struggling to get tasks done? Maybe you need to work on focusing better on the task at hand in order to become more efficient. Eager for a promotion? Perhaps you need to build better relationships to get there. Whatever area you choose, work on it in small doses.

While there are many ways you might implement personal growth into your career development, here are four examples of areas to improve, as well as advice for tackling them:

1. Build Emotional Intelligence
Solid emotional intelligence can help you forge strong working relationships with colleagues and clients, which in turn promote productivity and strengthen your professional reputation.

The ability to deal with people and conflict is important in most any job, but perhaps especially so when you take on a management or leadership role. “Emotional intelligence means being able to understand where someone else is coming from,” Essack says. “People want to work for someone who understands them.”

How to tackle it: Focus on becoming a better active listener, which helps others feel heard and understood. “We get caught up in saying what we want to say, but communicating effectively is also about being a great listener,” Essack says.

First, show the speaker that you’re paying attention. “Put away your devices, make eye contact, and fully concentrate on them rather than mentally preparing what you will say next,” Essack says. “Then, show that you’re listening with verbal cues such as ‘uh huh’ and body language, such as nodding, smiling, and leaning forward.” Finally, ask clarifying questions or reflect back with paraphrasing. Try starting with: “So what you’re saying is…,” or “What do you mean by…?”

2. Feel Confident in Your Talents
Building confidence is a common goal of personal development, and one that has a clear line to career gains. Developing your confidence can help you land a better job, negotiate for a raise or promotion, earn credit for your contributions, and be seen as a leader, Caprino says. But confidence isn’t something that’s easy to just switch on.

Instead, look for a path to confidence by working on recognizing your talents. If you don’t fully grasp what you’re amazing at and aren’t able to speak confidently about these talents, you won’t be able to fully leverage your unique abilities, Caprino adds.

How to tackle it: Many people struggle to look inward to discover where they shine—especially if they grew up hearing that they shouldn’t brag. So instead, look outward to colleagues and mentors for help identifying your unique talents. Ask them to name any contributions that have stood out to them as well as elements of your approach to work they consider particularly effective.

3. Grow Your Motivation
Wouldn’t it be great if we could bottle up motivation and consume it like we do our morning coffee? Imagine the benefits! At work, being more motivated can of course make you more productive, but it can also help you be seen as more driven and ambitious.

How to tackle it: Until motivation is sold by the bottle, you can work on building it little by little, Essack says. Think of motivation not as a mindset or mood that randomly descends on you outside of your control, but as a behavior. We tend to assume that when we’re motivated, we’ll take action—but the reverse can be true. “First you do the behavior and have a mini success, and that’s what makes you feel motivated again. Success builds on itself,” Essack explains.

For example, if you’re intimidated by holding performance conversations with employees, you might be tempted to avoid them until the last minute. But when you successfully commit to a small action, such as holding shorter, less formal performance check-ins, you may find more motivation to improve your skills and take on longer talks.

So instead of waiting for motivation to strike, try structuring your big goals into small achievable tasks to build momentum. This way you’ll help yourself experience each one you complete as an invigorating success and feel motivated to take the next step toward where you want to be.

4. Become More Mindful
Mindfulness is a term that’s thrown around a lot today, and its meaning can be as blurry as the concept of personal growth as a whole. Essentially, mindfulness is the act of training your brain to focus on the present moment, rather than racing ahead to the future, or drifting to the past.

Research has linked mindfulness to reduced stress, improved focus, and better working memory. At work it could help you zero in on the task at hand and filter out some of the surrounding noise, allowing you to become more efficient.

Mindfulness has emotional benefits too. Mindfulness can help you respond more thoughtfully to someone instead of having a knee-jerk reaction or snapping, Essack says. “You become more aware of what’s happening in the moment, so you choose a conscious response.” Building this skill can help keep you from burning bridges with clients or colleagues when tension rises or tempers flare.

Let’s say you receive some criticism that you don’t agree with or that injures your ego. “The tendency is often to react automatically because we feel defensive, but when we cultivate mindfulness, we’re able to take a step back in the moment and respond intentionally,” Essack explains. In this instance, a more mindful approach could help to de-escalate conflict and make feedback discussions more productive.

How to tackle it: Develop a daily mindfulness meditation practice, which over time, can help you become more mindful throughout the day. Set aside five or 10 minutes a day to do a guided meditation, with help from an app like Calm or Headspace that will talk you through the process.

As difficult as personal development may be to define, investing in it can help lay the groundwork for professional success. As Caprino says, “If we don’t do the work to strengthen ourselves as people first, our careers will be a dismal disappointment.”
Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/personal-development-growth-goals-at-work-examples

1

So you just landed a leadership role at a new company. Congratulations! Going in, you know there’ll be a learning curve when it comes to handling your new responsibilities. But there’s also the people factor to consider.

Being the boss of a completely new team also means influencing a group of employees you don’t know very well to work together (and with you) toward a common goal. Nerve-racking, yes. But not impossible!

Even seasoned leaders make mistakes when managing a new team. Here are four common ones to avoid if you want to make your transition as smooth as possible for both you and your direct reports.

Mistake #1: Acting Before Understanding
If you think the first thing you need to do when joining a new team is to start making changes—slow down. Yes, part of your role is to help things run better, and you were most likely hired to bring in some new perspectives and fix some outdated or dysfunctional strategies. But ignoring input from experienced team members—particularly those who have been at the company for a while—won’t win you any fans.

Instead, you’ll signal to your team that you’re only interested in running a one-person show. And it will leave you vulnerable to making bad decisions that could’ve been avoided had you gotten some context.

This isn’t to say that you need to form a whole committee to make decisions on every little thing. You’re the boss, after all, and sometimes it’s your duty to make the final call. But strive to implement changes (especially big ones) in baby steps and over time. Be receptive to (and ask for!) feedback from your team before moving forward, and communicate your intentions clearly and proactively when you do.

Mistake #2: Constantly Talking About the “Old Job”
Do you find yourself saying all too frequently, “At my old job, we…”? Maybe you’re trying to prove yourself by bringing up your old wins. Or you may just feel comfortable referring back to a time when everything didn’t feel so foreign. (Being the new kid on the block isn’t easy.)

Here’s the thing: Your current team will quickly tune you out if you’re constantly talking about how things were done at your previous company. They want to see that you’re able (and willing!) to adapt to a new environment, and that you can competently lead and work with their unique skill sets.

Yes, you achieved great things in your last role. But don’t get caught living in the past—it’s time to focus on creating new wins with what your new team has to offer.

Mistake #3: Hiding in Your Office
Closing your office door or hiding behind your monitor can give off the appearance that you’re not interested in being there for your employees.

You may think, “I’ve told my team they can come to me any time with questions.” But as the saying goes, actions speak louder than words, and it can be intimidating for employees to knock on a new boss’ door. There’ll be times when you’ll need (or want) to close the door, and that’s OK—but make sure this doesn’t create a barrier between you and your team.

Make a conscious effort to show your employees that they’re welcome to come seek guidance or share concerns. Literally keeping your door open helps, so does providing “office hours” or popping your head out every few hours or so to see how everyone’s doing.

If you work in an open office, try to avoid wearing headphones all day, and when you can, sit near your team. You can also schedule weekly touch-base meetings with your direct reports so you have dedicated face time with them on a regular basis—and so that they know they will always have the opportunity to discuss something with you.

Mistake #4: Believing You Don’t Need to Know the Details of Your Employees’ Work
Some people think that the role of a leader is to just tell others what to do and set expectations. But there’s more to it than that. You can’t hold employees, especially new direct reports, accountable if you don’t fully grasp what their roles entail and how they approach their work.

While you don’t need to know all of the nitty gritty details of their responsibilities, you want to do more than just care that tasks are getting done. Understanding the “how” of operations and the “whys” behind how your employees tackle them will make both you and your team function better. You’ll be able to better manage them knowing their strengths, weaknesses, and preferred forms of communication, and they’ll feel more comfortable around you and motivated to do great work with the knowledge that you’re invested in their success.

Take the time when you’re just starting out to talk to each employee individually to learn about what they do, what their current challenges are, and how their tasks fit into team or company goals. You can even ask the following questions in your next one-on-one:

What challenges are you facing that are making you less productive?
What’s missing from the team that will help make everyone’s life easier?
How do you like to receive constructive feedback?
What are you hoping to learn from me that will support you in your role?
What do you enjoy the most about your work?
Or you can have them fill out this user manual so you have all the information you need about their working style.

Mistakes are going to happen when you’re starting a new job, whether you’re a manager or not, so don’t be too hard on yourself if you don’t get things “right” the first time. Even just reading this article means you care deeply about being a good boss to your new team—and that’s a great place to be in!

Most importantly, make sure you enjoy this new beginning—because it’s one more phase in your career that will help you grow and become the kind of leader you want to be.
Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/common-mistakes-starting-new-job-boss?ref=recently-published-1

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Tourism expenditure in the Central Coast region has topped $1 billion for the first time ever, a 22% increase on the previous year.

The unprecedented figure was generated through 672,000 extra day trip and overnight visitors, 666,000 additional visitor nights and $185,000 in additional visitor spending.

The latest National Visitor Survey results report that the number of Australian overnight visitors to the Central Coast grew by 15% to 1.618 million visitors for the year ending March 2019, outpacing 6% growth to regional NSW broadly, and outperforming competitor destinations the South Coast, North Coast and Hunter. Similarly, strong growth was seen in the number of day-trip visitors (4.09 million, +12.7%).

Although off a lower base, international visitor nights grew by 34.7% to 974,000, or an average of 14 nights for each of the 69,000 international overnight visitors.

This followed good growth in the Central Coast’s tourism visitation metrics in the year ending December 2018, when a total of 5.3 million day and overnight visitors came to the region, 259,000 more (5.1%) than December 2017.

Since July 17, Tourism Central Coast has set about improving perceptions, intention to travel and tourism spend to the Central Coast among the region’s largest and most accessible market, Sydney.

The Have a Little Adventure campaign ran from 24 June 2018 and finished 10 October 2018. This has been sustained by our “always-on” social and native campaign which started in December 2018.

The proximity of the key Sydney market to the Central Coast makes it much more responsive to marketing messages. Sustained campaign activity from June to March dovetails with the period of growth. This, along with post-campaign research showing increased desirability and intent to travel to the region show that our destination marketing is working to achieve increased visitation and tourism expenditure.

We’ve also worked hard to galvanise and engage the region’s tourism business community with the need to work together to revive tourism growth. That has been demonstrated by over $250,000 in cooperative campaign investment and more and more businesses engaging with us at our monthly industry networking events.

 

 

Source: https://www.tourismcentralcoast.com/news-item/2864/how-effective-marketing-is-reviving-tourism-growth-on-the-central-coast

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Local dental practice, Warnervale Dental has partnered up with mobile dental services provider Teeth N Smiles who deliver free dental care to students at schools. The dental practice will offer continued care for Teeth N Smiles patients requiring further dental treatment following their initial oral health assessment.

Australia’s fastest growing mobile dental services provider, Teeth N Smiles provides on-site oral health assessments for students, workers and aged care residents. Their mobile dental clinics are fully equipped dental surgeries on wheels and comprise of a team of qualified dentists and dental professionals. According to the founder Ramy Morkos, the “Teeth N Smiles team are eager to bring happy smiles to students”. “Our mission is to keep students’ beautiful smiles bright and glowing by providing regular and free-of-charge dental services”, says Morkos.

Warnervale Dental share a similar vision to Teeth N Smiles and are also dedicated to improving the oral health of Australians. Practice Principal, Dr David Bassal is a major contributor in the local community and is delighted to be able to support the Teeth N Smiles Schools program. Bassal and his team are also able to offer free dental care and treatment for eligible children. “For kids who qualify under the Child Dental Benefits Schedule (CDBS) we are able to provide up to $1000 worth of dental treatment which can mean the difference between healthy teeth for life” explains Bassal.

Warnervale Dental and Teeth N Smiles considers prevention of dental disease as a priority. The experienced Warnervale Dental practitioners also provide dietary and oral hygiene advice to ensure a healthy oral environment from the start. Bassal explains that “by delivering positive dental visits, we believe your child will become familiar with our team and embrace their visits”.

The Teeth N Smiles van is currently visiting a variety of schools across the Central Coast and is inviting further schools to participate in this fantastic community program. The service is focused on being agile and mobile, which gives greater flexibility. The team can also arrange to visit schools for students, workplaces for employees or even residents at aged care facilities.

 

Source: https://www.centralcoastaustralia.com.au/news/mobile-dental-van-keeping-local-kids-smiling/?current-news

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When you’re starting a job search, your goal is to make your credentials strong enough to get you selected for a job interview. Once you get to a job interview, you can sell yourself to the interviewer by confidently making the case that you’re an exceptional candidate. Before that though, what’s on your resume and cover letter is going to be the pitch that gets you picked for an interview.

One of the best ways to achieve that goal is to brand (or rebrand) yourself if necessary, so you’re a close match for the jobs you’re targeting. What does this mean? And how do you do it?

What’s in a Brand?

Branding (if you haven’t worked on creating a brand yet) or rebranding (if you’re considering a job or career shift), means deciding what professional path you’re on and tailoring your credentials, expertise, and what’s visible to network connections and prospective employees, to match that brand.

How to Get Started

The first step in creating or reinventing your brand is to determine what you want that brand to represent. What type of job would you love to have? Would you like a new job in a similar role or the same job in a different industry? If so, that’s a relatively easy brand update. If you’re looking for a career change, you’ll need to invest more time and energy into rebranding yourself.

Check yourself out. Google yourself and check the results before you start making any changes. You will want to see how the current information available about you reflects your professional persona, and ensure that it clearly reflects where you are in your career and where you want to go next. Look at it from the viewpoint of a hiring manager to see what narrative you are sharing about your achievements and aspirations.

Make a plan. It’s important to figure out how you’re going to get to where you want to be. Does your career need a makeover? Do you need new skills or certifications? Or can you tweak your brand and update it so it’s a fit for where you want to go next? Make a list of what you need to do before you get started. There are things you can do at your current job to position yourself for success in the next one. If your career needs a major overhaul, it will require more planning and a bigger investment of time.

Upgrade your credentials. Are you short on the skills you need to make a successful brand switch? If you can carve out some time, it can be easy to gain the skills you need to bolster your qualifications. There are many free and low-cost classes you can take to get the career skills you need. Once you’ve upgraded your skill set, take on some freelance projects to create a portfolio of skills related to your rebranding objective. You can add those skills to your resume and LinkedIn, and refer to them in your cover letters.

Be careful. As with a job search when you’re currently employed, be careful about the changes you make that are visible to your current employer. For example, if you’re working in sales, you don’t want your Twitter feed to be all about product development. Gradually mix in the new topics if you’re using social media for business purposes. Make sure “Share with network” is turned off while you’re updating your LinkedIn profile if you’re connected to current colleagues. If you make changes slowly and carefully, it’s easier to stay under the radar.

Create a Branding Statement

A branding statement is a short and catchy statement that encompasses what makes you a strong candidate for a job. Writing a branding statement can help you to capture the essence of what you want to accomplish in the next phase of your career. Taking time to write your own statement will help you to focus on what you want to accomplish with your branding or rebranding.

Add a Branding Statement to Your Resume

Adding a branding statement to your resume is a way to show employers how you can add value to the organization if you were to be hired. Don’t use the same branding statement every time you use your resume to apply for a job. If your branding statement isn’t a perfect match for the job, take the time to tweak it so it reflects the attributes the employer is seeking. As with all job search materials, it’s important to show the employer how you’re among the best-qualified candidates for the job.

Update Your LinkedIn Profile

Also, update your LinkedIn profile. It doesn’t have to match your resume exactly, but it should be close enough to pass scrutiny because employers will check it. Take time to write a summary that’s informative, reflects your career interests, and will grab hiring managers’ attention.

Check Your Other Social Accounts Too
Is the message you’re sending to recruiters and networking connections consistent? When they look at each of your various public social media accounts will they get the same impression? Consistency is important when you’re using social media for career development. Using the same professional photo across platforms will help to build your brand.

Rebrand Yourself (Carefully)

When you’re thinking about a major job shift or a career change, rebranding might be in order. Rebranding is something you should do slowly and carefully if you’re currently employed. You don’t want to advertise to your current manager, other employees of the company, or clients that you’re rebranding your credentials and seeking new opportunities. That way you won’t jeopardize the job you have, and you can move on when you’re ready.

GRADUALLY CHANGE YOUR LINKEDIN PAGE

Making small changes over time will be less noticeable. For example, you could gradually change your LinkedIn profile by reworking some of your job descriptions to fit better the brand you’re aiming for. They should still reflect what you did at each job, but the focus can shift.

UPDATE YOUR LINKEDIN HEADLINE

The headline section of LinkedIn is designed for short, descriptive text. Use that to highlight the skills you have that match your goals. Again, don’t get too far off-base from your current role if you’re employed. If you’re not currently working, you’ve got some more flexibility in how you write your headline.

REWORK YOUR RESUME

Another option is to keep your LinkedIn job descriptions brief and vague. Instead of changing LinkedIn, you can tweak your resume to match better with each position you’re applying for. There won’t be a noticeable difference to current or prospective employers. There are small and simple, but very powerful changes that you can make that can have a big positive impact.

Use Your Cover Letter to Explain

What’s in your cover letter is between you and the hiring manager reading it. Employ your cover letter to tell the story of your career pivot. Write a targeted cover letter that highlights your strongest accomplishments and assets that qualify you for the job, helping to convince the hiring manager that you’re well worth interviewing.

Start All Over Again

Rebranding your career isn’t a one-time deal. Technology changes, the economy goes up – or down, in-demand skills change over time, and most people’s career aspirations change along the way. The average person changes jobs 10 -15 times over their career. Your career will most likely shift over time too.

As you gain additional work experience, take a course, or otherwise learn new skills, add them to your resume and LinkedIn profile. Tweak your job descriptions as you move forward so they reflect where you are going, as well as where you’ve been.

By making some slow and steady changes your rebranding will be a work in progress, and you’ll be able to use your brand successfully to boost your career.

 

Source: https://www.thebalancecareers.com/how-to-brand-yourself-for-the-job-you-want-4583968

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There’s a whole lot of talking about yourself that goes on in an interview. One of the most stressful parts might be when a recruiter or prospective boss asks you to tell them about your strengths and weaknesses.

You’re bound to hear, “What would you say is one of your weaknesses?” or “What’s your greatest strength?” or both in virtually every hiring process you’ll ever go through. While that might be frustrating—really, every time?!—it also means that you can anticipate the questions and craft thoughtful answers that will impress the interviewer.

In other words, with just a little bit of preparation, you can master the art of selling your strengths without sounding conceited and talking about your weaknesses without undermining your candidacy.

Why Do Interviewers Ask These Questions?
Before you get started planning your responses, it’s helpful to understand why interviewers are asking these questions in the first place and what they hope to get out of them.

“All interviews are about getting to know somebody,” says Muse career coach Angela Smith, founder of Loft Consulting. “I know some people feel like the interview is trying to trip them up or put them in an awkward position, but at the end of the day it’s really about getting to know the person so that you can make the best decision that you can,” she adds. “When I ask those questions, that’s where I’m coming from.”

In this case, the actual strengths and weaknesses you bring up probably matter less than how you talk about them. “I’ve done a ton of interviews over the years and when pressed for it, I can’t really remember the answers,” Smith says. That doesn’t mean the questions aren’t important at all, it’s just that what an interviewer is evaluating likely goes deeper than which specific strength or weakness you cite. They’re trying to understand what kind of employee you’d be and how you’d carry yourself in the role.

“For me it’s: Are they honest? Do they have self-awareness? Can they own their stuff in a professional and mature way? Is this someone that we can have growth and development conversations with? Are they going to hit a wall [when] it comes to giving them feedback?” Smith says. “How they answer that question really tells me the answer to all of those other things—and those are the things that matter.”

5 Tips for Talking About Strengths and Weaknesses in an Interview
Okay, that’s all great in theory, but what do you actually need to do to discuss your strengths and weaknesses successfully?

1. Be Honest
One of the most important things to get right when talking about your strengths and weaknesses in an interview setting is honesty. It might sound trite, but it’s also true. An answer that sounds genuine and authentic will impress, while one that sounds generic, calculated, exaggerated, or humblebraggy will do the opposite.

A boss doesn’t want to hire someone who can’t recognize and own what they bring to the table as well as what they need to work on. You’ll be a better employee if you can understand and leverage your strengths and acknowledge and learn from your weaknesses. So you want to show in the interview that you’re capable of that kind of self-reflection.

2. Tell a Story
Here’s another cliche you shouldn’t discount: “Show, don’t tell.” Anyone who’s ever taken a writing class—whether in seventh grade or graduate school—has heard it. You should keep it in mind when answering just about any interview question, and it’s certainly helpful here.

“Anytime you can have a real-life example or a concrete example, it’s a good idea. It just helps to contextualize the response a little bit,” Smith says. “We just understand concepts and situations better with a story. So if you can tell a story that supports your thesis, then it’s always helpful.”

Talk about a time your strength helped you achieve something in a professional setting or when your weakness impeded you. For example, if you’re talking about how you’re calm under pressure in a fast-paced environment, you might tell the interviewer about that time you delivered a revamped client proposal after a last-minute change of plans. If you’re admitting that your weakness is presenting in front of high-level executives, you might start by briefly describing the time you got so nervous presenting your plan for a new marketing strategy that you weren’t able to effectively convey your (thorough and pretty brilliant) approach and your boss had to step in and help get the plan approved.

Not only will sharing a real example make your answer stand out, but it’ll also make it sound thoughtful and honest and highlight all those other characteristics interviewers are actually looking for.

3. Remember to Get to the Insight
An answer that’s genuine and includes an illustrative anecdote is a great start, but it’s not complete until you add some insight. This goes for both strengths and weaknesses but looks a little different in each case.

When you’re talking about a strength, the last beat of your answer should tie whatever skill or trait you’ve been discussing to the role and company you’re applying for. Tell the interviewer how that strength would be useful in this particular position at this particular company.

So going back to the revamped client proposal example, you might add, “Since things move quickly at [Company], this would allow me to come in and earn a new team’s confidence and foster a trusting team culture while also ensuring we’re all hitting our goals and delivering high-quality work.”

In the case of a weakness, “tell me how they’ve grown from it or what they’ve done to accommodate that or what they’ve learned from it,” Smith says. “Really showcase your growth trajectory, your learning curve, what you’ve done as a result of the awareness of that weakness,” she adds. “It gives you an idea like if I hire this person and they’re here, this is the kind of problem solving or growth that I can expect to see from them.”

So if you were the candidate with the presentation snafu, you might talk about how you sat down with your boss to make a plan to improve your public speaking skills, and how the next time you had to present to the execs you knocked it out of the park.

4. Keep It Short
You don’t have to devote half the interview to these answers. You can keep your response relatively brief and focused on one or two strengths or weaknesses, depending on how the question was phrased. To add to our list of overused-but-handy phrases: Think quality, not quantity. Don’t dive in and rattle off a litany of things you think you’re good or bad at without explaining anything. Instead, narrow it down and go into detail.

5. Don’t Sweat It So Much
While you definitely want to prepare and do your best to nail your answers, try not to stress too much. “Don’t panic,” Smith says. “I have never known an employment decision to come down to how someone answers those questions,” she adds. “It’s just one data point connected with a whole bunch of other ones. So don’t give it too much weight.”

How to Answer “What Are Your Strengths?” in an Interview
The key to talking about your strengths in an interview is to use the opportunity to demonstrate that you’re the best fit for the role, the team, and the company.

Smith recommends reading carefully through the job description and learning as much as you can about what the company is up to and what the culture is like. Read various pages on the organization’s website, take a look at its social media accounts, and catch up on some recent announcements and news coverage if applicable. Use what you’ve learned to identify which of your strengths is most relevant and how it will allow you to contribute. Then make the connection inescapable. “Every answer should position you to help them see how you can solve a problem” and help the company achieve its goals, Smith says.

At the same time, you don’t want to go overboard. “It’s such a fine line. I always tell people not to worry about bragging, but you also don’t want to come across as cocky or too full of yourself,” Smith says. Give a confident and honest assessment that does your skills justice, but don’t let yourself veer into hyperbole.

What It Might Sound Like
If you’re applying for an operations role at a startup, you might say:

“I’d say one of my greatest strengths is bringing organization to hectic environments and implementing processes to make everyone’s lives easier. In my current role as an executive assistant to a CEO, I created new processes for pretty much everything, from scheduling meetings to planning monthly all hands agendas to selecting and preparing for event appearances. Everyone in the company knew how things worked and how long they would take, and the structures helped alleviate stress and set expectations on all sides. I’d be excited to bring that same approach to an operations manager role at a startup, where everything is new and constantly growing and could use just the right amount of structure to keep things running smoothly.”

How to Answer “What Is Your Greatest Weakness?” in an Interview
While you’ll definitely want to tie your strengths to the role and company you’re applying for, you should avoid that approach when talking about your weaknesses. “You don’t necessarily want them associating a weakness with their company or with what they’re looking for,” Smith says. For example, if the job description for a sales role lists excellent verbal communication skills, you shouldn’t say one of your weaknesses is thinking on your feet during phone calls, even if you’ve worked hard to improve and feel more than competent now.

It’s the same advice she’d give someone writing a cover letter when applying for a job for which they have most, but not all, of the qualifications. Focus on the requirements you do bring to the table, not on the ones you don’t.

Instead, prepare a couple of standard options to choose from and in each interview, talk about a weakness that doesn’t obviously impair your ability to perform the core functions of the role. Make sure you admit the weakness, pivot to the insight, and end on a strong note. “If someone can be honest and have the self-awareness to answer that question, I think that says a lot about their emotional intelligence and their professional maturity,” Smith says.

Her last piece of advice? Don’t pick a “weakness” like “I’m such a hard worker” or “I’m too much of a perfectionist.” Going down that route will backfire, because it comes off as disingenuous, oblivious, or immature—and none of those are qualities that’ll get you the job.

What It Might Sound Like
If you’re applying for an engineering job, you might say:

“My greatest weakness would probably be waiting too long to ask questions to clarify the goals of a project and to make sure I’m on the right path. I noticed in one of my first coding jobs out of college that I would get an assignment and, because I assumed I should be able to work independently, I’d waste time going down a particular road that didn’t 100% align with the ultimate goal and then would have to spend additional time making changes. After it happened once or twice, I started asking my manager more questions about why we were adding a particular feature, who it was intended for, what about the previous functionality had made for a poor experience, etc. And especially for bigger projects, I would reach out when I needed a gut check to ask follow-up questions as well as to share the work I’d done so far and what I was planning to do next. In the long run, it meant I could finish projects faster and do better work.”

 

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/strengths-and-weaknesses-interview-question-answer-examples?ref=recently-published-1

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The Food and Wine Festival is a one day festival of fine food, amazing wines and live entertainment for all ages to enjoy!

The annual Festival is held this year on Sunday 4 August at Mt Penang Parklands, Kariong.

The Food and Wine Festival is aimed at young people, adults families who have an interest in gourmet food and wine. You can expect to find a range of food, ciders, beer and wine vendors as well as live entertainment and kids activities.

The upcoming festival is unique as it is a collaboration between a range of local businesses to support business growth and socialisation on the Central Coast.

Source: https://www.tourismcentralcoast.com/news-item/2758/the-annual-food-and-wine-festival-back-at-mt-penang-parklands

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When you’re getting ready for a job interview, it’s always good to try to predict which questions an interviewer might ask. If you’re like most people, you’re fully prepped to field queries about what you know and the experience you have, like “Tell us about your responsibilities in your current job” or “Explain the strategy you used for [project on your resume].”

But don’t stop there! Recruiters and hiring managers also often ask behavioral questions, which can help them get a better idea of your personality and your soft skills. This could include questions like, “What type of work really excites you?” or “Tell us about a time you were frustrated by your colleagues.”

An even more sophisticated example that may not initially seem like a behavioral question is “What do you like least about your job?” Because it can be a bit of a “gotcha” question, you’ll want to craft your response with care. We talked to a few career experts and got their insights to help you avoid the pitfalls and answer it the right way.

Resist the Temptation to Vent
Even for those of us who genuinely love our careers, “What do you like least about your job?” is a question that we could easily wax poetic about over a few rounds of drinks with friends. But an interview is not the time to dish about, for example, how your boss is not nearly as smart as you.

That’s because this question isn’t really about discovering what you dislike, points out Conrad Woody, a partner at Odgers Berndston, an executive search and recruitment firm. More likely, it’s a test of how you would respond to an invitation to vent. “The interviewer wants to know if you’re the type of person who will go negative when given the opportunity,” says Woody.

Your answer should not leave the interviewer believing they could be your next gossip victim if things don’t go well. Speaking negatively of your current employer ends up reflecting poorly on you, not the company. If you must vent, save that for your friends—ideally not ones you work with.

Focus on New Opportunities
A great way to answer this question is to talk about a responsibility or duty you’d get to have at your new job that your current role doesn’t offer. For example, if the job you’re interviewing for requires that you deliver presentations to large groups, you could share that you wish your current job gave you the opportunity to flex the public speaking skills you’ve honed at your local Toastmasters club.

Alternatively, you can speak about a responsibility at your current job that simply isn’t challenging you any longer because you’ve mastered it. Just make sure that whatever it is, it isn’t a duty that’s integral to the job you’re interviewing for!

Frame the Answer in a Positive Way
No matter what you talk about, always take the opportunity to turn the negative into a potential positive with your new employer. “You don’t want to focus too much time on something you hate or don’t like,” says Tamara Rasberry, an HR Manager in Washington, DC. “Even when you briefly mention something you don’t like, highlight that you are well-versed in it but that it simply doesn’t challenge you anymore or utilize all of your strengths.”

By quickly pivoting to how your current role was a necessary and informative building block for your next career move, you show your ability to find the silver lining and do what needs to get done.

What This Looks Like
Need some inspiration? Consider these sample answers:

The “It Was Fun While It Lasted” Answer
By concentrating on the positives of the new employer, you can avoid mentioning anything explicitly negative about your current job:

“While I enjoyed working for a large law firm because I was able to gain experience across several subject matters, I’d prefer to bring all those learnings to your firm because I believe that your singular focus on the entertainment industry would allow me to have deeper impact.”

The “I’d Rather Be Doing Something Else” Answer
This answer briefly mentions a current responsibility, but focuses on the opportunity the new job would provide:

“In my current role, I’m responsible for drafting media lists to pitch. While I’ve developed a knack for this and can do it when it is necessary, I’m looking forward to a job that allows me to have a more hands-on role in working with media partners. That is one of the things that most excited me about your Account Supervisor position.”

The “You Asked, So Here Goes” Answer
There is of course, always the bold option, which is to speak more bluntly and directly about something not-so-great about your current role or company. But again, you’ll want to end on a positive note that spotlights your enthusiasm for the new job:

“My current company acquires new business through traditional methods like cold calling and direct mail. I’m impressed with the digital, email, and social acquisition campaigns you have implemented and how they reflect a more modern, innovative approach. While I am flexible enough to succeed in a diversity of work environments, I’m eager to work for a company that embraces change.”
Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/what-do-you-like-least-about-your-job-interview-question-answer?ref=carousel-slide-0

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BRISBANE Waters Private Hospital is celebrating the efforts of its volunteers, who have collectively clocked up 76 years of service.

The acknowledgement coincides with National Volunteer Week from May 20-26, the annual celebration of the outstanding work of our nation’s volunteers.

Hospital CEO Kathy Beverley said: “This year the theme for National Volunteer Week 2019 is ‘Making a world of difference’, such a true statement for our community members who volunteer at our hospital.”

Thousands of events will be held across the country this week to say thanks to the six million Australians who volunteer their time, with Brisbane Waters Private Hospital honouring its volunteers with a special morning tea awards ceremony in the Memorial Gardens at the hospital.

“Encouraging our volunteers to remain with the hospital is important, and providing recognition of their contribution is equally important,” Kathy said.

“We value our volunteers, which is evident in the number of years they have remained with our hospital.”

She said research showed that 96 per cent of those donating their time for the greater good found more happiness in their own lives.

The benefits are numerous, from improving volunteers’ health and happiness to promoting a sense of belonging, boosting mood and making friends.

“Volunteering is a great way to promote strong social networks,” Kathy said.

“Research also suggests volunteering is a beneficial way to connect with your community and build positive relationships through creating social capital, building bonds of trust, cooperation and respect for diversity.”

 

 

Source: https://www.seniorsnews.com.au/news/hospital-volunteers-clock-up-combined-effort-of-76/3733273/

26 05 19

When your job search seems to be stuck and you’re not getting the contacts from employers you were expecting, it’s even more important than usual to make sure that you stand out from the job searching crowd.
You will need to show the hiring manager—at a glance—that you are a candidate who definitely should be selected for an interview.
What can you do to get noticed? It’s not as hard as you might think. Your application materials have to be perfect, of course, and you will need to use your connections to help get an “in” at the company. You’ll also need to actively market your candidacy and yourself, rather than waiting for a new job to find you.

Write a Targeted Resume

Taking the time to edit or rewrite your resume so it matches the qualifications for the job you’re applying for will show the hiring manager that you have the credentials for the job and should be considered for an interview.

Write a Targeted Cover Letter

Write a cover letter that shows, at a glance, why you are a strong match for the job. Don’t repeat your resume, rather link (list or use bullets) your relevant skills to the skills the employer is seeking. Highlight your professional qualifications that match the hiring requirements. You only have seconds to catch the hiring manager’s attention, so use them wisely.

Build Your Professional Brand

Sometimes, recruiters Google candidates even before they schedule an interview so be sure to build your professional brand. You will want to make sure that everything they find when they search and everything related to you on the professional and networking sites (like LinkedIn and Facebook) is information that is presentable to the public. Also, be sure to edit your profile on LinkedIn so your connections know you are available for career and/or job opportunities.

Use Your Connections

Do you have connections at the company you just sent your resume to? If so, use them. They may be able to give your resume a boost and help you get an interview. You can also use your connections to find out more about the company. I know one job seeker, for example, who was able to connect with an employee at the company he was interviewing and get the inside scoop on the job and the company — before he set foot in the door.

Be Proactive

Remember that old saying “He who hesitates is lost” — it’s true. Employers don’t wait forever for applicants to submit their resume (I know more than a few people who have waited too long to apply and lost out on what could have been a good job), so when you find a job listing that’s a good match, apply immediately. Set up job search agents on the job search engines and/or job banks so you get new positions via email as soon as they are posted online. Again, don’t wait to apply.

Unstick Your Job Search

If your job search seems to be stuck, try some new initiatives to get it started, so you can get back on track to find a new job, sooner rather than later.

Practice Makes Perfect

Practice before you go for an interview. Review typical interview questions and research the company so you are well-prepared to interview. Have interview clothes ready (dry cleaned, shoes polished, etc.) so you’re ready to interview professionally at a moment’s notice. That way, your first impression will be positive and that’s the impression you want to make on everyone you meet when you’re job searching.

Send a Thank You Note

Don’t forget to follow up with a thank you note reiterating your interest in the job. Most candidates don’t bother, but those that do are more likely to get hired.

 

 

Source: https://www.thebalancecareers.com/how-to-be-a-compelling-candidate-2059756

CC 26 05 19

A handful of Sydney’s who’s who have snapped up high-end holiday homes on the Central Coast in the first months of this year, fuelling local agents hopes that their luxury home market is finally closing the gap on traditional high-end getaway destinations like Palm Beach and Whale Beach.

Upping the Central Coast’s competitive advantage is that the cost of high-end luxury houses comes at a fraction of the price in Palm Beach, where beachfront houses have sold this year for $10.35 million and $18 million last year for surfside homes.
“We are definitely getting more well-known executives and high-profile corporate types from Sydney who want the weekend escape but appreciate that you can buy beachfront here for half what you would pay in Palm Beach,” said McGrath Terrigal’s Mat Steinwede.

Sydney Olympic Football Club president and Forum Group executive chairman Bill Papas and his Forum Group co-director Vince Tesoriero set a Wagstaffe record in January when they paid $5.8 million for a contemporary waterfront home in the San Toy Estate.

“The Central Coast is fast becoming the Palm Beach alternative,” said Belle Property’s Cathy Baker, who sold the Wagstaffe property.

SQM Research analyst Louis Christopher said: “The Central Coast also offers more supply and variation on quality of property.”

But the Central Coast’s success is in large part on the back of Palm Beach, says LJ Hooker Palm Beach’s Peter Robinson, pointing to the hourly ferry service at peak hours between Palm Beach and Ettalong and Wagstaffe, as well as the success of the Boathouse Hotel Patonga run by northern beaches locals Pip and Andrew Goldsmith.

“There’s also a lot more crossover between Palm Beach and Avalon and the Central Coast now in terms of workers commuting and kids going to school here, all who rely on that ferry service,” Mr Robinson said.

Liquor industry veteran Peter Toohey and his wife Phillipa swapped their Newport waterfront home they sold a year ago for $5.42 million to join the likes of billionaire Scott Farquhar, financial analyst Paul Clitheroe and coal baron Peter Freyberg on the North Avoca beachfront in February. They bought for $2.82 million.

Medlab Clinical research facility chairman Michael Hall and his wife Elizabeth Jones, owner of Arida clothing boutique, had no sooner pocketed $12 million from their Point Piper neighbour Mike Cannon-Brookes for their long-held family home than they bought a beachfront cottage at Macmasters Beach in March for $3.55 million.

It was sold by George Brand’s Kyle Brand, who has since sold the contemporary beachfront house next door for $4.5 million on behalf of investment banker Paul Binsted.

Paul Hennessy, who heads up the Australian arm of one of the world’s largest asset managers Capital Group, earlier this year took possession of a clifftop house on Macmasters Beach for $3.5 million.

In Toowoon Bay a company owned by Nitzan Ronen, of the Dolina fashion house family, bought a beachfront house for $4.3 million that has DA approvals to be knocked down and rebuilt at a cost of $2.6 million.

It is next door to a beachfront house the Ronen family have owned since 2011 for $1.5 million, fuelling local speculation the two houses are set for amalgamation.

The high-end sales results come as Domain data shows the Central Coast median house price fell 7.2 per cent to $605,000 in the 12 months to the March quarter.

“At the top end of the market — over $6 million — we haven’t seen much of a downturn, although we haven’t seen much activity either,” Mr Christopher said.

“People who don’t require financing have not been hit by the restrictions on lending so much as the rest of the market.”

 

 

https://www.domain.com.au/news/move-over-palm-beach-the-central-coast-is-stealing-your-buyers-837749/

1

While it’s tempting to measure career growth and success solely according to the number of rungs we scale on the corporate ladder, management isn’t the only path to a satisfying career. Being a manager comes with responsibilities that don’t appeal to everyone. Even worse, managerial work could take you away from the aspects of your job you love most.

But just because you don’t have any interest in presiding over a team doesn’t mean that you’re destined to stagnate—or that you have to grudgingly heave yourself up to the next level. In other words, you don’t always have to move upward to move onward.

We asked professionals who’ve blazed a trail off the management track to fill us in on four ways you can continue to evolve professionally—minus the supervisory duties.

1. Look for Opportunities That Offer In-Role Advancement
Not all growth involves taking a step up. Certain roles offer opportunities to stretch yourself within the same position, through a greater variety of projects, more prestigious assignments, deeper work, or more responsibility. When hunting for your next non-managerial job opportunity, consider point-blank asking about what growth looks like within the role rather than what’s beyond it.

While working as a media agency VP, Nathanael Yellis realized managing a team came with some emotional costs. Being on-call as a resource for his direct reports—as well as being beholden to his own manager’s schedule—took away from the time and energy he was able to spend with his family. So he set out to find an individual contributor role that still offered in-role growth.

Yellis ultimately found it within his current position as an Inbound Consultant for HubSpot. There, not only does he have more direct control over his time, but he can still develop his career without stepping up to a managerial role. “I have promotions available to me that come with increased status or customers who are more critical to HubSpot’s success,” he says. “As I continue to grow in the role, I’ll have the opportunity to work with larger companies in a wider variety of industries.”

Because he’s customer-facing, he’s able to establish clear boundaries for when and how he interacts with clients, such as deciding he isn’t available for conference calls between 5 and 8 PM. “Beyond that,” he says, “not having to make the emotional commitment to managing people frees emotional bandwidth I have at home.”

2. Make a Lateral Move Somewhere Bigger or More Prestigious
If you’re not interested in becoming a bigger fish in a small pond, consider bigger ponds, whether that means a larger company, a greater swath of sales territory, or a more prestigious brand. In the case of Danielle Radin, the digital correspondent for NBC San Diego, the puddle-to-lake leap meant a bigger broadcast market.

While Radin had a master’s degree that primed her for the managerial track, she found that she liked being a reporter, and didn’t want to deal with the office politics that came with managing others in the newsroom. Instead of hopping up the ladder, she’s been hopping to larger markets. “In broadcast the goal is to move up to bigger markets, which are ranked by population from 1 all the way down to 209,” she explains. “I started in one of the lowest-ranked markets, 195, and was able to jump to San Diego, ranked 28.”

Of course, few fields offer quite the concrete ranking system by which to measure your growth, but other indicators, both quantitative (think: company size and potential number of clients) and qualitative (think: influence or reputation) can be your guide when you’re looking to make a lateral move.

3. Go Solo as a Consultant
Once you become an expert in your field, you can deploy your skills and experience in a consulting role. That’s what Stacy Caprio, founder of Accelerated Growth Marketing, an SEO/SEM consulting company, did.

Caprio previously worked as the search marketing manager for a finance company, but didn’t like the idea of having to be responsible for anyone else’s work but her own. She tested the waters by consulting as a side hustle and eventually made it her full-time career. When you go it alone, you can chart your own career growth with the same metrics you use to measure your consulting business’ success, such as reach and revenue.

Though the freedom of consulting is a huge perk in itself, Caprio says it’s also been more financially lucrative than her previous position. “I like that it has given me the opportunity to learn so much and be hands on in what I do, instead of just a supervisor who has no idea what her employees are doing,” she says. “It has also allowed me to make a lot more than I would have been able to make in a managerial role.”

4. Deepen or Broaden Your Skill Set to Become an Expert
If you’re not devoting time and energy to cultivating managerial skills, you can focus on honing other skills, whether that means perfecting your sales pitch, becoming a financial-modeling wizard, or mastering every project management tool under the sun.

In addition to having the tangible metric of market size by which to gauge her growth, Radin says her non-management path has given her the opportunity to improve her writing, editing, shooting, and presenting abilities on a daily basis. “Find a niche in your job that you truly thrive in, and improve it as much as you can so that you are considered one of the top in that skill set,” she advises.

While a deeper skill set is satisfying in and of itself, you can also establish a few key performance indicators to assess growth more objectively. Alex Tran, a digital marketing specialist, opted out of management to focus on the more hands-on aspects of her career. Instead of measuring her performance according to how close she’s getting to a head-honcho title, she uses other metrics relevant to her industry.

“In marketing I am measuring our brand visibility and reputation. If we are getting more leads than we can handle, that is great,” she says. “That means we will need to expand and hire more, which is what every growing organization wants. I am a grower, not a leader.”

Stepping outside of management may give you a chance to expand your skills outward as well. When Caprio made her move to consulting, she found that she was able to extend her expertise beyond the parameters of her in-house role. In those 9-to-5 jobs she held, “my focus was 70% running paid Google and Facebook ads,” she explains. “Once I was consulting full-time, I really dove into more than just theoretical SEO, which enabled me to develop a new skill set driving more unpaid traffic to sites.” she adds. “I used this to further expand into buying my own sites and growing them, so one thing led to another.”

 

 

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/grow-your-career-without-becoming-a-manager

1

NRMA Parks and Resorts announced it will further expand its portfolio to manage four additional locations across the Central Coast.

The four parks on the Central Coast will see the NRMA Parks and Resorts stable of owned and managed parks grow to 48. The NRMA is one of Australia’s largest tourism providers with a portfolio valued at over $800 million.

The four parks to be managed by NRMA for Central Coast Council are:

– Budgewoi Holiday Park

– Canton Beach Holiday Park

– Norah Head Holiday Park

– Toowoon Bay Holiday Park

NRMA Parks and Resorts CEO Paul Davies said the organisation was committed to providing guests a world-class experience at every one of their owned and managed holiday parks.

“Tourism isn’t just about the traveller, it’s about the communities they visit. Communities like the beautiful Central Coast offer unique experiences for domestic and international travellers and the NRMA is committed to unlocking these experiences for everyone,” Mr Davies said.

“Our philosophy is to provide exceptional holiday experiences, with a combination of fantastic locations, great hospitality and excellent facilities and we are looking forward to working closely with Central Coast Council, local tourism operators, and eateries to attract tourists to the region,”

“The Central Coast is a real hot-spot for holiday makers throughout the year, but local communities still have so much to gain from encouraging more visitors to the area. With kilometres of pristine coastline, cultural events and friendly locals; we’re positive each and every guest will have a fantastic experience in the region.”

NRMA Parks and Resorts already owns and operates NRMA Ocean Beach Holiday Resort at the beautiful Umina Beach. The NRMA also operates Fantasea Cruising, running regular ferry services to the Central Coast between the Ettalong, Wagstaffe and Palm Beach.

 

 

Source: https://www.tourismcentralcoast.com/news-item/2417/nrma-parks-and-resorts-to-manage-council-holiday-parks