Posts Tagged “development”

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We’re all looking for ways to improve ourselves—at least that’s what the thriving $10 billion self-help industry seems to imply.

But as popular and alluring as the principles of personal development may be, many of us still have only a fuzzy understanding of it. Even fuzzier: How to turn personal growth into professional gains.

At the same time, there’s an undeniable overlap between the two—after all, our personal strengths and weaknesses affect us at work, too. And there are ways in which growing personally and working on ourselves can make us more effective at work.

If that still feels a little murky, we get it. Read on to learn exactly what personal growth is and get concrete ways to leverage it in your career.

What Is Personal Growth Anyway?
Personal growth or development is difficult to define, in part because it’s, well, personal. Broadly speaking, personal development is an effort to improve yourself, the outcomes in your life, or how you experience life, explains Sumayya Essack, a career-change coach and founder and owner of Curate the Future.

“Personal growth is the process of growing stronger, more confident, and more effective as a person and an agent of change for your own life,” says Kathy Caprino, a career and personal growth coach. More specifically, it relates to “how you see and perceive yourself, interact with others, engage with the world, and envision your future and your possibilities.”

It affects you in both concrete and more abstract ways, including emotional regulation, communication abilities, well-defined boundaries, decision-making, and personal satisfaction and positivity.
Where Personal and Professional Development Meet

At first glance, personal growth can seem a little vague compared to professional development goals. “Career growth tends to focus on tangible performance-related goals, such as raises [and] promotions,” Essack explains. It may also emphasize hard skills, which depending on your field could include things like data analysis or proficiency in a certain language or type of software.

However, if you think of personal and professional growth as two circles of a Venn diagram, there’s a healthy overlap between them. “Your career success and enjoyment of your career aren’t just the result of domain-related skills and knowledge. It’s also a result of what you bring to the table as a person,” Essack says.

Things we think of as soft skills—such as communication style, self-motivation, and how you relate to other people—fall into the area of overlap. And these skills greatly impact our ability to get things done at work. Developing them can help you become more effective in your career, and maybe even nab a promotion.

4 Personal Development Goals That Can Help You Get Ahead at Work
Even if you’re sold on the benefits of personal growth for your career—where do you start? In large part, it’s up to you.

“At the root of all personal development is becoming aware of what’s happening in your own mind and becoming aware of how the thoughts you’re thinking affect your emotions, behaviors, and results,” Essack says. If you can identify a result you’re unhappy with or, conversely, one you want to achieve, you can work backwards from there to determine the underlying thoughts, emotions, and behaviors you should address to make the change you desire.

For example, are you constantly struggling to get tasks done? Maybe you need to work on focusing better on the task at hand in order to become more efficient. Eager for a promotion? Perhaps you need to build better relationships to get there. Whatever area you choose, work on it in small doses.

While there are many ways you might implement personal growth into your career development, here are four examples of areas to improve, as well as advice for tackling them:

1. Build Emotional Intelligence
Solid emotional intelligence can help you forge strong working relationships with colleagues and clients, which in turn promote productivity and strengthen your professional reputation.

The ability to deal with people and conflict is important in most any job, but perhaps especially so when you take on a management or leadership role. “Emotional intelligence means being able to understand where someone else is coming from,” Essack says. “People want to work for someone who understands them.”

How to tackle it: Focus on becoming a better active listener, which helps others feel heard and understood. “We get caught up in saying what we want to say, but communicating effectively is also about being a great listener,” Essack says.

First, show the speaker that you’re paying attention. “Put away your devices, make eye contact, and fully concentrate on them rather than mentally preparing what you will say next,” Essack says. “Then, show that you’re listening with verbal cues such as ‘uh huh’ and body language, such as nodding, smiling, and leaning forward.” Finally, ask clarifying questions or reflect back with paraphrasing. Try starting with: “So what you’re saying is…,” or “What do you mean by…?”

2. Feel Confident in Your Talents
Building confidence is a common goal of personal development, and one that has a clear line to career gains. Developing your confidence can help you land a better job, negotiate for a raise or promotion, earn credit for your contributions, and be seen as a leader, Caprino says. But confidence isn’t something that’s easy to just switch on.

Instead, look for a path to confidence by working on recognizing your talents. If you don’t fully grasp what you’re amazing at and aren’t able to speak confidently about these talents, you won’t be able to fully leverage your unique abilities, Caprino adds.

How to tackle it: Many people struggle to look inward to discover where they shine—especially if they grew up hearing that they shouldn’t brag. So instead, look outward to colleagues and mentors for help identifying your unique talents. Ask them to name any contributions that have stood out to them as well as elements of your approach to work they consider particularly effective.

3. Grow Your Motivation
Wouldn’t it be great if we could bottle up motivation and consume it like we do our morning coffee? Imagine the benefits! At work, being more motivated can of course make you more productive, but it can also help you be seen as more driven and ambitious.

How to tackle it: Until motivation is sold by the bottle, you can work on building it little by little, Essack says. Think of motivation not as a mindset or mood that randomly descends on you outside of your control, but as a behavior. We tend to assume that when we’re motivated, we’ll take action—but the reverse can be true. “First you do the behavior and have a mini success, and that’s what makes you feel motivated again. Success builds on itself,” Essack explains.

For example, if you’re intimidated by holding performance conversations with employees, you might be tempted to avoid them until the last minute. But when you successfully commit to a small action, such as holding shorter, less formal performance check-ins, you may find more motivation to improve your skills and take on longer talks.

So instead of waiting for motivation to strike, try structuring your big goals into small achievable tasks to build momentum. This way you’ll help yourself experience each one you complete as an invigorating success and feel motivated to take the next step toward where you want to be.

4. Become More Mindful
Mindfulness is a term that’s thrown around a lot today, and its meaning can be as blurry as the concept of personal growth as a whole. Essentially, mindfulness is the act of training your brain to focus on the present moment, rather than racing ahead to the future, or drifting to the past.

Research has linked mindfulness to reduced stress, improved focus, and better working memory. At work it could help you zero in on the task at hand and filter out some of the surrounding noise, allowing you to become more efficient.

Mindfulness has emotional benefits too. Mindfulness can help you respond more thoughtfully to someone instead of having a knee-jerk reaction or snapping, Essack says. “You become more aware of what’s happening in the moment, so you choose a conscious response.” Building this skill can help keep you from burning bridges with clients or colleagues when tension rises or tempers flare.

Let’s say you receive some criticism that you don’t agree with or that injures your ego. “The tendency is often to react automatically because we feel defensive, but when we cultivate mindfulness, we’re able to take a step back in the moment and respond intentionally,” Essack explains. In this instance, a more mindful approach could help to de-escalate conflict and make feedback discussions more productive.

How to tackle it: Develop a daily mindfulness meditation practice, which over time, can help you become more mindful throughout the day. Set aside five or 10 minutes a day to do a guided meditation, with help from an app like Calm or Headspace that will talk you through the process.

As difficult as personal development may be to define, investing in it can help lay the groundwork for professional success. As Caprino says, “If we don’t do the work to strengthen ourselves as people first, our careers will be a dismal disappointment.”
Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/personal-development-growth-goals-at-work-examples

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Woolworths had previously indicated that their next priority, following the opening of their Wadalba store, will be the long-awaited project at the proposed Warnervale Town Centre site. The Town Centre site is also currently seeing the construction of planned housing developments and a park being built by Council. The pace of infrastructure development in the area has picked up in the last year, with a long-awaited new ambulance station being built at Hamlyn Terrace, along with a new private Hospital being built at Kanwal. This is being further complemented by the beginning of the $200m upgrade of Wyong Hospital, representing a huge investment in health infrastructure in the area.

Work has also begun on the new Bunnings development at Lakehaven and a series of industrial and commercial developments ongoing at North Wyong, marking a good sign in the battle against the Central Coast’s 18.1 per cent youth unemployment rate.

David Harris said he welcomed the investment and development in the area and committed to continuing to fight for further funding for local road upgrades and infrastructure needs. “After years of what seemed like a lack of interest from Government and the private sector in our area, we are seeing vital community infrastructure being delivered in and around the Greater Warnervale Area,” he said. “These investments will be a significant boost for jobs in our local area and mean residents have access to better services, closer to home. “I look forward to Woolworths hopefully following through and prioritising its long-awaited development at the Town Centre site. “In 2016, we were facing the imminent privatisation of Wyong Hospital and not much in the way of local service development. “We have fought hard to get where we are and it’s great to see the progress.”

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2018/08/harris-welcomes-new-investment/

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The Central Coast could be heading for an education crisis as the region’s schools are pushed to beyond capacity by rampant residential development.

Literally thousands of major new residential units are either under construction or approved across the region. Hundreds more are proposed and pending decisions either from Central Coast Council or the Joint Regional Planning Panel.

In Gosford alone, the number of new units — and potential extra students – could be substantial. The Waterside development will contain 500 units when completed. John Singleton’s Bonython Tower will add 56 units. The recently proposed five tower residential complex at North Gosford will contain 400 more if approved. Other unit blocks are underway around Gosford Railway Station and in Hill Street.

All these fall within the catchment of Henry Kendall High School and Gosford Public School and are just one example of the coming major demographic shifts likely to impact on local schools.Central Coast P and C president Sharryn Brownlee warned that existing Central Coast schools would struggle to cope with a major influx of students unless there was a massive investment in permanent new classrooms, buildings and teaching resources, and even in new schools.

Mrs Brownlee said there was a real danger of schools becoming clogged with demountable buildings and outdoor spaces disappearing under “pop up” school buildings as the education department tried to deal with the problem.

She said school bus transport currently could not cope with transporting overflow numbers to nearby schools, adding to major traffic congestion problems.

“Henry Kendall High School as it is now could not accommodate extra children around Gosford without significant investment in new classrooms, buildings and teaching resources — you cannot have a demountable city just plonked down on the site,” Mrs Brownlee said.

“It can’t happen, its not educationally sound. It would destroy the learning environment — that’s the truth of it,” she said.

“Even relocating extra students to other high schools or bussing them temporarily is fraught with problems — Narara Valley High School is a long way from where the developments are and Lisarow High needs a huge upgrade just to cope with the existing students.”

Mrs Browlee said Gosford Public School was already at capacity and limited by the site.

“There was no forward planning around the relocation of that school — no extra land provision or thinking ahead,” Mrs Brownlee said.

LACK OF PLANNING
Mrs Brownlee said planning for development in greenfields sites in the north of the Central Coast had been better with a new primary school planned for that area, and a community consultation process in place.

“The question is — will that one school be enough and what are the department’s plans around high schools for that area?”

“We are concerned there have been no new school builds up here for years and capital investment is really behind where the population is,” she said.

“Wamberal is 20 years overdue for an upgrade, Point Clare is ten years overdue. Gosford Public School was rebuilt but with no future provision.

“The Department of Education demographers fought kicking and screaming to not build Kariong Mountains High School — which now has nearly 800 students enrolled.

“It’s a substantial, functional, quality high school — can you imagine if those 800 students were also added to Henry Kendall and those kids were commuting down there by bus?”

Mrs Brownlee said there should be an education impact statement with every new residential development.

“There is nothing more important than the mandatory 13 years of schooling but the impact of new developments on education is not properly considered in the DA process,” Mrs Browlee said.

“We don’t know what the education plans for the Central Coast are because there is a complete lack of transparency and no cohesive plan.”

Source: https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/central-coast/development-boom-could-lead-to-schools-crisis-says-central-coast-pc-council/news-story/c71403fee2c8d82360dfb7b645649b03

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The Central Coast Council has determined 3,000 development applications since it was created in May 2016, worth over $1 billion to the economy of the new Local Government Area (LGA).
New housing opportunities will be available close to one of the Coast’s greatest attractions, the beaches, with residential unit developments approved for Canton Beach, with more to come.
The Central Coast also remains an ideal place to build the family dream home with 914 additional lots created since the merger.
Council Group Leader, Environment and Planning, Mr Scott Cox, said Council’s role was to ensure it had the right planning controls in place to continue to grow and encourage sustainable development on the Central Coast.
“We have a huge challenge to meet the housing and employment needs of our growing community while maintaining the enviable lifestyle and environment we all enjoy here,” Mr Cox said.
“We are in the process of consolidating our planning controls so that there is consistency across the Coast, as we want to ensure that we can facilitate the right development we want to see here.
“The growth in housing, particularly unit style development, needs to be where transport connections and opportunities are, in our town centres and tourism hubs, and we want to encourage development there.
“The mix needs to be right in delivering a range of housing options to match various household needs, but also ensuring that the unique environment on the Coast is enhanced and protected.”
Council held its first Developers’ Forum on Monday, February 27, with over 140 industry leaders in attendance to start the conversation as to how Council and the development sector can work together to deliver sustainable development for the Central Coast.
Due to the strong interest in the Forum from the development sector, a number of industry members were unable to fit in, so Council will hold another informal Developers’ Forum in Wyong in May on a date to be determined.

Source: http://coastcommunitynews.com.au/2017/03/over-1-billion-worth-of-development-applications-determined-by-merged-council/

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Central Coast Council has drafted new planning controls to promote development to revitalise the Gosford CBD and create a living city.

The amendments to the Gosford Development Control Plan (GDCP) will provide opportunities for growth of the commercial centre of the CBD while ensuring that Kibble Park remains an attractive sunny space for the community to enjoy. The GDCP seeks to encourage creation of a distinctive skyline while preserving view lines to the ridge tops and activation of streets and public spaces.

Council’s Group Leader of Environment and Planning, Mr Scott Cox, said the plan has been amended to ensure the building design for the Gosford CBD reflects its status, in the NSW Government’s Regional Plan, as the regional capital of the Central Coast. The draft is now on public exhibition.

“We have a vision of what the future built form of the CBD could look like – taller, slimmer buildings around the new commercial core of the CBD, Kibble Park, with activated public spaces so people can live and work in the city centre,” Mr Cox said.

“Gosford is now the confirmed capital of the Central Coast and must become a true living city and drive development on the Central Coast.

Council’s Administrator Ian Reynolds said revitalisation of the CBD is something the community has wanted to see for some time.

“We want to see more cranes in the sky and more development moving in the CBD and these new controls will go some way to deliver that,” Mr Reynolds said.

“We are saying to developers this is a great opportunity to be a part of transforming the Gosford CBD and deliver good quality design that will change the face of the CBD forever.

“I urge the community to review the amended plan closely as we are interested in feedback as to how we can move development in the CBD forward.”

The amended Gosford DCP is on public exhibition until 16 December 2016 and can be viewed online at haveyoursaycentralcoast.com.au, under Items on Public Exhibition.

Source: https://www.centralcoast.nsw.gov.au/new-development-controls-revitalise-gosford-cbd/