Posts Tagged “feedback”

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The first 90 days of your new job are crucial to set yourself up for long-term career success. It’s where you make good on the promises you touted during your interview and set the stage for how people perceive you.

That’s why asking for feedback during this time is so, so important. It quickly demonstrates to your new boss that you’re invested, you’re committed to excellence, and that you’re in this for the long haul.

Plus, if done well, you can earn major brownie points that may help you get recognized later for opportunities to work on interesting projects or even advance more quickly.

Easy enough, right? Now that you know just how important your first 90 days are, here are some guidelines for how to ask for feedback to ensure you’re on the right path (or how to get on it).

When Should You Ask?

Eliciting feedback in these crucial first few days is a balance between giving your new manager and co-workers enough time to form concrete thoughts and opinions of you, while also being proactive in prompting feedback that will help you as you get onboarded.

Rule of thumb: Don’t expect a formal review by the end of week one. After that, it’s all a judgement call. How much real work have you actually had a chance to do? If you’ve just completed a big project or finished a tougher assignment, now may be the perfect time to ask for some input on how you did. Regardless of the above, don’t let three weeks go by without making the big ask.

A good rhythm for how frequently you continue to check-in will hinge on the volume and involvement of your work. That said, a good best practice is no more than once a week, but no less than once a month.

How Should You Ask?

Don’t pounce at the water cooler or in the bathroom while your boss is washing her hands. Reach out to your manager via email or in person and request a meeting directly. Explain what the meeting is for—people will appreciate having a heads-up so they can prepare ideas ahead of time.

Try something like, “I’d like 15 minutes of your time to talk about how you think things are going so far with me. Are you satisfied with what I’m doing, and the work I’m producing? Is there anything I can be doing differently?”

What Should You Ask?

Give your manager suggestions on what you want to hear, such as, “How am I integrating within the team?” “Am I operating at the speed you need me to?” or “How is the quality of my work? Any development areas you have already identified that I can work on?”

This is also the time to coach your manager on what you need in terms of resources. Would you benefit from regular one-on-ones or additional training? Perhaps a tracking system that you and your manager have access to to share what you’re working on?

Who Should You Ask?

Besides your boss, co-workers are also a great resource for feedback. While it doesn’t need to be as formal as with a manager, try crafting an email along the lines of, Hey, I’m loving it here so far, and would love to get some feedback from you to make sure I’m setting myself up for long term success. It’s really important to me I’m doing a good job and making a good impression.

The reality of soliciting feedback is that it may not always be 100% positive. So, prepare yourself mentally. All your good intentions will immediately be nullified if you go into “defensive” mode. Keep your ego out of this conversation and stay open and non-judgmental.

Then, send a follow-up email thanking your manager or colleague for their time and candor, and briefly outline your takeaways and any next steps you plan to take. Implement any areas of improvement right away and follow-up with your boss to make sure the adjustments you’re making are correct and noticed.

We know there’s a lot to learn in your first 90 days. You’ve got new systems, technologies, faces, and names to remember, and so much more. It’s easy to feel overwhelmed.

Incorporating this advice displays maturity and commitment on your part, and will also give you a good indication of whether you’re doing well, or need to make some adjustments before its too late. Regardless of what you learn, it will empower you to excel in your new role.

 

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/how-to-ask-for-feedback-first-90-days-successful-new-job

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If you’ve ever had a manager ask you for feedback, then you probably also remember the way you reacted.

You likely hesitated and, if you’re like many professionals, shared some positive reinforcement. If you were feeling courageous, maybe you added a small “this is good but could be better!” area of improvement. But if there was a larger issue at hand? You said nothing, bringing it up felt too risky.

Now you’re in that manager’s position and you’re not getting real feedback from your team. They say things are fine but you know better—no one’s perfect, you probably do have a few areas you could improve in, and you know that the more you improve, the better off your team will perform.

So how do you get honest feedback as a leader? (And before performance review season?) Ask. And ask again.

Assuming that your team will proactively tell you how to improve is a mistake. As the boss, it’s your job to open the door (repeatedly) to make them comfortable to say something. And because I know this can be hard, I came up with the four types of questions that’ll help open up that dialogue.

1. The Open-Ended Question

If you rarely ask for feedback, a simple open-ended question may be enough to speak conversation.

Try one of these out:

I’m always trying to improve as a professional and as a manager. Is there anything I could be doing better or differently?

Getting feedback is how I keep improving and I love using the SSC framework for it—is there anything I should stop, start, or continue doing?

2. The Project-Specific Question

Sometimes people are more comfortable being open when the feedback doesn’t feel as personal. Try asking questions around a project you’re working on with them to get the scoop on what you could do better.

A few examples of how to do this:

Hey Jane, I noticed that the team was scrambling at the end of the week to deliver the project to Client X. Is there anything I could’ve done differently that would have made that smoother for you? I want to make sure I’m helping remove obstacles for the team, even if one of those obstacles includes me or my current process.

The annual gala was a big success! While it’s still fresh in our minds, I’d love your feedback on anything we could do differently next year or ways I could change what I did to be more helpful to you and the team.

3. The Self-Identified Area-to-Work-on Question

In some cases,  it’s not a surprise what you need to work on. You may have identified it yourself, or been told at your last review that you really need to have better attention to detail or be more responsive to your team.

When you know what you’re looking to improve, that’s a great chance to ask more targeted questions like:

At my last review, one of the areas of feedback from the team was that my responsiveness wasn’t where it needed to be. I’m actively working on that, but I know that sometimes I slip up and would love your feedback when I do. Is there anything right now you’re waiting on me for?

I’m working on my attention to detail, since I know it’s an area I’m not always as strong as I need to be. Could you give me feedback after this afternoon’s presentation on any places I didn’t get the details just right?

4. The Question That Takes Guts

Finally, there’s the nuclear option. It’s not an easy ask, but hearing an honest answer to it can be one of the most valuable gifts someone gives you. When asking this, it’s incredibly important that your tone, body language, and response be truly open.

Please tell me the thing you think I don’t want to hear.

Before you run off and start asking these questions, let me first share an important rule.

How you react during this discussion is really important. If you get defensive or angry, that employee will be much less likely to share anything with you again, and will likely spread the word to others who report to you.

So make sure to thank them for being honest with you, and tell them you’ll think about what they said. You don’t have to agree, you don’t have to act on it, but you do have to consider it.

Plus, even if you don’t agree, someone out there thinks that of you, which means others might as well; at a minimum you have an area of improvement when it comes to perception or communication. (If you think this might be a challenge, here’s advice on taking constructive criticism like a champ.)

And even if you don’t agree this time around, you want them to bring you the next round of feedback which might be right on the money. As I said earlier, your team will only do better when you grow as a manager.

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/dear-managers-this-is-how-you-get-honest-feedback-from-your-team?ref=carousel-slide-0