Posts Tagged “new”

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Woolworths had previously indicated that their next priority, following the opening of their Wadalba store, will be the long-awaited project at the proposed Warnervale Town Centre site. The Town Centre site is also currently seeing the construction of planned housing developments and a park being built by Council. The pace of infrastructure development in the area has picked up in the last year, with a long-awaited new ambulance station being built at Hamlyn Terrace, along with a new private Hospital being built at Kanwal. This is being further complemented by the beginning of the $200m upgrade of Wyong Hospital, representing a huge investment in health infrastructure in the area.

Work has also begun on the new Bunnings development at Lakehaven and a series of industrial and commercial developments ongoing at North Wyong, marking a good sign in the battle against the Central Coast’s 18.1 per cent youth unemployment rate.

David Harris said he welcomed the investment and development in the area and committed to continuing to fight for further funding for local road upgrades and infrastructure needs. “After years of what seemed like a lack of interest from Government and the private sector in our area, we are seeing vital community infrastructure being delivered in and around the Greater Warnervale Area,” he said. “These investments will be a significant boost for jobs in our local area and mean residents have access to better services, closer to home. “I look forward to Woolworths hopefully following through and prioritising its long-awaited development at the Town Centre site. “In 2016, we were facing the imminent privatisation of Wyong Hospital and not much in the way of local service development. “We have fought hard to get where we are and it’s great to see the progress.”

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2018/08/harris-welcomes-new-investment/

NSW Premier, Ms Gladys Berejiklian, and Health Minister, Mr Brad Hazzard, officially opened Gosford Hospital’s new 11-storey tower on June 23.

“Together with the $200m Wyong Hospital redevelopment, the $348m Gosford Hospital redevelopment is delivering next-generation, first-class health care to the Central Coast,” Ms Berejiklian said. “The technological advancements in the new 11-storey tower block are incredible, including for the first time, a nuclear medicine service which will greatly improve diagnoses for a range of conditions, and speed up scans for emergency patients. “The redevelopment is part of our government’s record $8b health infrastructure spend over the next four years,” Ms Berejiklian said. Mr Hazzard said clinicians and the community contributed to the innovative design.

“The new tower has been designed with patients in mind, with privacy and comfort front and centre,” he said. “The Intensive Care Unit has the largest windows of any public hospital in the state, and a courtyard with oxygen and gas fittings means that some of our sickest patients can be outside,” he added. The new tower features: a Special Care Nursery, with expanded capacity for newborn cots from 10 to 15, and pull-out beds for parents and carers; an Intensive Care Unit with glass screens that can be switched to opaque (instead of curtains); an MRI machine to diagnose stroke, cancer, infection and joint abnormalities; single or double rooms with an ensuite and a patient/relative lounge in each unit; and, dedicated staff and patient lifts to offer more privacy. The complete redevelopment, due to be finished by 2019, also includes a new $35.5m carpark and refurbished spaces for allied health, cancer day unit, emergency short stay unit and cardiovascular services.

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2018/07/hospital-new-11-storey-tower-opened/

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The first 90 days of your new job are crucial to set yourself up for long-term career success. It’s where you make good on the promises you touted during your interview and set the stage for how people perceive you.

That’s why asking for feedback during this time is so, so important. It quickly demonstrates to your new boss that you’re invested, you’re committed to excellence, and that you’re in this for the long haul.

Plus, if done well, you can earn major brownie points that may help you get recognized later for opportunities to work on interesting projects or even advance more quickly.

Easy enough, right? Now that you know just how important your first 90 days are, here are some guidelines for how to ask for feedback to ensure you’re on the right path (or how to get on it).

When Should You Ask?

Eliciting feedback in these crucial first few days is a balance between giving your new manager and co-workers enough time to form concrete thoughts and opinions of you, while also being proactive in prompting feedback that will help you as you get onboarded.

Rule of thumb: Don’t expect a formal review by the end of week one. After that, it’s all a judgement call. How much real work have you actually had a chance to do? If you’ve just completed a big project or finished a tougher assignment, now may be the perfect time to ask for some input on how you did. Regardless of the above, don’t let three weeks go by without making the big ask.

A good rhythm for how frequently you continue to check-in will hinge on the volume and involvement of your work. That said, a good best practice is no more than once a week, but no less than once a month.

How Should You Ask?

Don’t pounce at the water cooler or in the bathroom while your boss is washing her hands. Reach out to your manager via email or in person and request a meeting directly. Explain what the meeting is for—people will appreciate having a heads-up so they can prepare ideas ahead of time.

Try something like, “I’d like 15 minutes of your time to talk about how you think things are going so far with me. Are you satisfied with what I’m doing, and the work I’m producing? Is there anything I can be doing differently?”

What Should You Ask?

Give your manager suggestions on what you want to hear, such as, “How am I integrating within the team?” “Am I operating at the speed you need me to?” or “How is the quality of my work? Any development areas you have already identified that I can work on?”

This is also the time to coach your manager on what you need in terms of resources. Would you benefit from regular one-on-ones or additional training? Perhaps a tracking system that you and your manager have access to to share what you’re working on?

Who Should You Ask?

Besides your boss, co-workers are also a great resource for feedback. While it doesn’t need to be as formal as with a manager, try crafting an email along the lines of, Hey, I’m loving it here so far, and would love to get some feedback from you to make sure I’m setting myself up for long term success. It’s really important to me I’m doing a good job and making a good impression.

The reality of soliciting feedback is that it may not always be 100% positive. So, prepare yourself mentally. All your good intentions will immediately be nullified if you go into “defensive” mode. Keep your ego out of this conversation and stay open and non-judgmental.

Then, send a follow-up email thanking your manager or colleague for their time and candor, and briefly outline your takeaways and any next steps you plan to take. Implement any areas of improvement right away and follow-up with your boss to make sure the adjustments you’re making are correct and noticed.

We know there’s a lot to learn in your first 90 days. You’ve got new systems, technologies, faces, and names to remember, and so much more. It’s easy to feel overwhelmed.

Incorporating this advice displays maturity and commitment on your part, and will also give you a good indication of whether you’re doing well, or need to make some adjustments before its too late. Regardless of what you learn, it will empower you to excel in your new role.

 

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/how-to-ask-for-feedback-first-90-days-successful-new-job

CC Festival

The Lakes Festival is celebrating its fourth year in November, and Central Coast Council is looking for new and exciting event ideas to join the 2018 Festival Program.

The Lakes Festival is a 10-day event which celebrates the beautiful waterways across the Central Coast. In 2017, the Festival attracted over 60,000 patrons over the 10 days, with over 600,000 people reached via a strong marketing campaign including print, outdoors, social media and radio. “Do you have an innovative idea?” a Council spokesperson said. “Think outside the box and get involved. “Examples of ideas we are looking for include art based events, major events, sculpture events/ projects, digital media and installation events/ projects, or any other innovative event you can think of. “Events are assessed by the committee on their potential to involve the local community and visitors to the region,” a Council spokesperson said. Events must incorporate the lake, either via location or theme, and should be located around one of the below event hubs: McKenzie’s Reserve, Budgewoi, Canton Beach Foreshore, Long Jetty Foreshore, Picnic Point, The Entrance, Gosford Waterfront, Ettalong Beach and any other waterways on the Central Coast (pending approval).

“This year you will be able to apply for funding via Central Coast Council’s grants program to assist with getting your idea/event off the ground,” a Council spokesperson said. “The two types of grants you can apply for are a Community Partnership Grant or a Place Activation Grant. “The Community Partnership Grant aims to support existing local community events and projects, and you can apply for funding for between $5,000 and $20,000 (combined cash and in-kind). “It is specifically designed for activities and events that have grown and are of interest to a particular community or provide benefit to the Central Coast Community.

“Eligible applicants for this grant include a legally constituted not-for-profit organisation, a group auspiced by a not-for-profit organisation, and a business.” A Place Activation Grant is provided to support individuals, artists, community organisations, members and businesses to deliver activities in the areas of Place Making, Creative Industry and Social Enterprise. “You are able to apply for funding up to $5,000 under this grant, with the grant focusing on a new activity that enhances our local community, creates public artwork, or helps develop a social enterprise that is unique and creative”, the Council spokesperson said This is open to community groups, a business, artists or individuals. Applications close on Wednesday, Feb 28. Source: Media release, Feb 14 Central Coast Council Media.

 

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2018/02/new-ideas-sought-lakes-festival/

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New smart planning should mean less cars

There has been some discussion lately about the future of the Peninsula with mayor Cr Jane Smith and Peninsula Chamber of Commerce president Mr Matthew Wales talking about the need for a renewed urban design.

This may be so, but what is the chamber’s real vision? The Peninsula needs an urban design that benefits the whole community and would include low-rise, mixed-use buildings with active street frontages, more trees and open spaces that will create a better urban amenity than currently exists. It doesn’t need more traffic lights and more layers of car parking. One of the main points of a coherent urban design is the transport system. The Member for Gosford, Ms Liesl Tesch, is on the right track in relation to transport (Peninsula News, January 29), although what is required is future thought on transport and living spaces around the Peninsula that reflects projected climate change, sea level rise and technology.

The Peninsula needs a complete solution involving vertically integrated public transport for residents, commuters, school children and the elderly, not one-off projects. One possibility is the implementation of a light rail. Research by a Canberra university has shown utilisation of rapid transit can be successful in urban and regional areas of lower density and can be city-shaping, transforming communities when combined with long-term strategic urban planning.

A trackless light rail such as the ART in China could deliver considerable financial, social and environmental benefits to the area. This includes a flow-on effect to diversifying the economy, improving livability for the community and sustaining the environment by reducing traffic congestion and transport disadvantage, and increasing value capture and health via more walkable suburbs that are connected across the Peninsula.

Smart cities provide active transport, reliable sustainable public transport and urban design that responds to population growth but enhances the livability of locations. The money suggested to be spent on any major car parking project should be utilised in establishing a transport-orientated design project that services the whole of the Peninsula, looking at reducing traffic volumes rather than old engineering paradigms of more cars, more spaces to park them in and more traffic lights.

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2018/02/new-smart-planning-mean-less-cars/

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Central Coast Council’s Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Mr Rob Noble, officially stepped out of the position on Wednesday, September 20, handing over the reins to new CEO, Mr Brian Bell.
Mr Noble is leaving after two years as CEO at Wyong Shire Council and Central Coast Council, to return to his business and home in Queensland.
“I stayed longer than I originally intended, as I wanted to lead the new Central Coast Council through the amalgamation process, and support Administrator, Ian Reynolds, and our staff, in creating a vibrant and sustainable Central Coast,” Mr Noble said.“I am taking with me a lot of fond memories of the Central Coast.
“I have worked with some fabulous people and I am very grateful to have had the opportunity to work here,” he added.
Mr Bell has extensive experience in Local Government, spanning 50 years, including 12 years as General Manager of Lake Macquarie Council.
“Rob is leaving some very big shoes to fill,” Mr Bell said.
“He has led the transformation of two organisations into one Central Coast Council, and has created a solid foundation for the newly elected Council to build on,” Mr Bell said.
“I am looking forward to the challenge of continuing to lead the organisation through this transition period to the elected Council, while continuing on the excellent course Rob has set for us.”
Administrator, Mr Ian Reynolds, echoed these sentiments.
“Rob has done an amazing job, and it is due to his hard work and leadership, that this Council has achieved as much as it has,” Mr Reynolds said.
“He is a transformational, charismatic leader and has left a great legacy, and will be greatly missed by staff.
“He is without doubt one of the best CEOs I have encountered in all my years in government, and I thoroughly enjoyed working with him.
“Brian Bell is well equipped to continue and build on Rob’s work.
“He lives here on the Coast and has led an award-winning Council, Lake Macquarie Council, for a number of years.
“He has the runs on the board and the commitment to continue to make Central Coast Council the very best it can be,” Mr Reynolds said.
Parliamentary Secretary for the Central Coast, Mr Scot MacDonald MLC, also thanked Mr Noble for his leadership of Council.
“Mr Noble’s stewardship of the amalgamated Council has placed the region in great stead for the future,” Mr MacDonald said.
With the funding provided by the NSW Government, the new Central Coast Council has been able to implement the following major Wyong region projects: Disability Matters – Improved accessibility to natural spaces across the Coast, $800,000; Community Facilities – Access and inclusion upgrades to community facilities across the Coast, $580,000; and, San Remo BMX facility – New amenities, $640,000.
“The Council is now in a strong financial position to serve its community,” Mr MacDonald said.

Source: http://coastcommunitynews.com.au/2017/09/new-council-ceo-takes-control/

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Your first few weeks at a new job can be exhilarating. It’s often fast-paced and full of brand new things that can reignite a spark that you lost. After all, that might’ve been your reason for looking for this new gig in the first place.

But, it can also be overwhelming. And when you look at all the meetings on your calendar, you might think that your goal is to survive it. You can always go back and re-learn anything you missed this week, right?

And in a lot of ways, that’s true. Nobody expects you to master everything you learn during your first month, especially when it comes to understanding the finer details about your company. But there is an important question you should ask in every meeting you have (when it makes sense, of course):

How can my work make your life easier?

You might be thinking, “I barely know where the coffee machine is! How can I think about helping anyone else right now?” And that’s totally fair. But on my first day at my current job, my boss suggested that I set up meetings with everyone on my team and ask each of them this question. It was terrifying, and if I’m being honest, I really didn’t want to do it. But I didn’t want to disappoint my new boss more, so I got over my fear and piped up.

And when I did, I was pleasantly surprised by how it went.

Some people had really strong opinions. Others told me that they hadn’t even thought about it, but appreciated that I opened the conversation with that question. But what I ultimately learned was that your intro meetings don’t have to be a one-way street.

As much as you have to learn, it’s important to remember that you were hired to bring something different to the table—and you can do that as early as your first week on the job.

Again, I’m not going to pretend that this won’t be uncomfortable. I also understand that in some meetings, this will be seen as completely out-of-context. But when the opportunity presents itself and it feels like the next natural thing to say—challenge yourself to say it.

And then, before you worry you’re putting too much on your plate, know that you can respond with, “That’s really interesting to hear, once I’m completely onboarded, I’d love to find more time to discuss how can I start making this happen.”

I know. Asking this question might not make your first month any easier, but it’ll make the exact right impression on your new team. Not to mention, it’ll set you up to prioritize your tasks correctly. So take a deep breath and do it!

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/the-best-question-to-ask-when-youre-new-at-work?ref=carousel-slide-3

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The Central Coast 2036 Regional Plan clearly identifies Gosford as the capital of the region. “This thriving centre is a smart hub for health and education,” the plan said. 

The plan described what Gosford will be like in 2036: “The renewal of the city centre has attracted new residents, jobs, business and investment.” The plan sets out actions that will result in the growth of Gosford as the region’s capital including: “Coordinating government initiatives to attract business, residential development and complementary growth… will have fl ow-on benefi ts in helping to revitalise Gosford City Centre as a vibrant capital of the region.”

“The NSW Government will work with Council to promote commercial development through public investment and the relocation of public sector employment to the city centre,” remains a key platform in the government’s thinking about the city’s future. It points out that additional residential development will “help to build a livelier, more attractive and safer city centre. “The expansion of cultural and night time activities will support the tourism role of the city centre and complement tourism opportunities elsewhere in the region,” the plan said.

“Precinct planning will identify opportunities to grow and support the revitalisation of the city centre. “The focus will be on improving amenity, integrating transport, encouraging higher density housing within walking distance of the city centre and delivering community infrastructure.” According to the plan, the redevelopment of Gosford Hospital, including the addition of a Central Coast Medical School and Health and Medical Research Institute, will drive further investment in allied health and research. It also acknowledged the need to integrate planning for transport and car parking so that residents and workers can access the city centre.

The actions listed to grow Gosford as the region’s capital include focusing on professional, civic and health services for the region’s population, which suggests the city’s centre is expected to be the local government’s headquarters and main professional hub. The NSW Government’s fi nal regional plan commits to undertaking and integrating precinct planning “for the waterfront, arts and entertainment, city core, railway and hospital precincts to grow jobs and coordinate the delivery of improved transport infrastructure”.

Another action listed is to: “Attract and facilitate greater commercial development in Gosford City Centre by improving the public domain and providing opportunities for development through local planning controls”. Gosford City Centre will also be promoted as an attractive place to live, work and play through local planning controls that “support vibrant and safe cultural, entertainment and visitor activities”. Opportunities will be sought to better connect the east and west sides of the Gosford Railway Station, the plan said. The plan also promises to “ensure the development in Gosford City Centre responds to its natural setting and complements the public domain”.

Access to the city centre from the West and the North will also be improved under the plan. “The economy is strong and diversifi ed and is supported by effi cient freight and passenger connections to adjoining regions. “Proximity to Greater Sydney and Newcastle, bolstered by investment in transport infrastructure, has made it possible for residents to access a wider variety of jobs and services both within and beyond the region. “Tourism and recreation have become mainstays of the economy,” the plan said. The Regional Plan’s vision for the Central Coast is for settlement to be concentrated around existing urban and employment areas in the south and existing rural villages. It said “the scenic values and distinctive character of communities” would continue to underpin the social and cultural identity of the region.”

Communities will be better connected by an integrated transport system that prioritises cycling, walking and public transport. There will be enough housing to satisfy demand around Gosford City Centre, in growth corridors and local centres across the region. Greater housing supply will make housing more affordable. “The region’s renowned natural environment provides attractive settings for a range of lifestyles and is a drawcard for visitors beyond the region,” the plan said. Protecting the region’s coastal areas, water resources and biodiversity will assure the lifestyles, economic prosperity and environmental health of the region, the plan said.

To achieve the vision, the NSW Government set four goals for the region: a prosperous Central Coast with more jobs close to home; protect the natural environment and manage the use of agricultural and resource lands; wellconnected communities and attractive lifestyles; and, a variety of housing choice to suit needs and lifestyles. The plan puts contentious local issues such as land use west of the M1 motorway back on the agenda. For example, one “key action” in the plan is to: “Address land use needs west of the M1 Pacifi c Motorway to provide integrated and adaptable planning outcomes for natural assets, productive lands and rural lifestyles”. The NSW Government has released an implementation plan for 2016-18.

“A government direction will be issued to the Council so that when it prepares new planning proposals or updates local planning controls, they are consistent with the vision and guiding principles of this plan,” it said. An annual report will be prepared that presents indicators for housing, employment, communities and the environment, as well as advice to the government on the delivery of short-term actions, and the plan will be reviewed and adjusted every five years. According to the plan, the key to the future prosperity of the Central Coast “lies in leveraging the region’s many competitive advantages.

“They include a single Council, a strong labour force, a growing population, cost-effective housing and employment land, access to major markets, viable business locations, good transport infrastructure, an enviable natural environment and a community that cares about its future.” However, according to the plan, “At present there is a disconnect from these advantages. “Many people leave the region for work. “There is also a separation between infrastructure and growth, and the land use planning and policy decisions that will sustain the environment and resources for the future.”

The plan is intended to empower the Central Coast Council to work with the NSW Government to: foster economic development in strategic corridors and transport gateways; improve the network of vibrant centres that are accessible to residents; accelerate housing supply and increase housing choice within a well-planned and compact settlement pattern; and, secure environmental corridors to protect water resources, coastal areas and biodiversity.

Source: http://coastcommunitynews.com.au/2016/10/new-regional-plan-clearly-sets-future-central-coast-detail/