Posts Tagged “years”

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BRISBANE Waters Private Hospital is celebrating the efforts of its volunteers, who have collectively clocked up 76 years of service.

The acknowledgement coincides with National Volunteer Week from May 20-26, the annual celebration of the outstanding work of our nation’s volunteers.

Hospital CEO Kathy Beverley said: “This year the theme for National Volunteer Week 2019 is ‘Making a world of difference’, such a true statement for our community members who volunteer at our hospital.”

Thousands of events will be held across the country this week to say thanks to the six million Australians who volunteer their time, with Brisbane Waters Private Hospital honouring its volunteers with a special morning tea awards ceremony in the Memorial Gardens at the hospital.

“Encouraging our volunteers to remain with the hospital is important, and providing recognition of their contribution is equally important,” Kathy said.

“We value our volunteers, which is evident in the number of years they have remained with our hospital.”

She said research showed that 96 per cent of those donating their time for the greater good found more happiness in their own lives.

The benefits are numerous, from improving volunteers’ health and happiness to promoting a sense of belonging, boosting mood and making friends.

“Volunteering is a great way to promote strong social networks,” Kathy said.

“Research also suggests volunteering is a beneficial way to connect with your community and build positive relationships through creating social capital, building bonds of trust, cooperation and respect for diversity.”

 

 

Source: https://www.seniorsnews.com.au/news/hospital-volunteers-clock-up-combined-effort-of-76/3733273/

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The Australian Reptile Park is turning 60 years old and is throwing a two-week long birthday extravaganza to celebrate during the school holidays.

July 2018 marks the sixth decade that the park has been open as The Australian Reptile Park, and the milestone is a huge achievement for the Central Coast wildlife sanctuary, which now welcomes over 250,000 visitors a year.

The upcoming school holidays will be all about the celebration of this momentous occasion with the biggest birthday party ever, including a jumping castle, mega slide, face painting, fairy floss and limited edition merchandise that will only be on sale these holidays. Also adding to the celebration,

The Australian Reptile Park’s four new Dingo puppies have reached the perfect age to come out and say hello to visitors. By popular demand, just for the 60th Celebration, there will be the return of daily appearances by our resident Tyrannosaurus Rex, to the delight of visitors, as a small taste of the Dinosaurs Alive! event that the Park runs during the Summer Holidays drawing record crowds. General Manager, Mr Tim Faulkner, said of the celebration: “The Australian Reptile Park is so incredibly special to not only me, but the whole region. “The families that come here, the memories that are made here, it’s all a one-of-a-kind experience. “People remember holding their first snake here, seeing their first huge saltwater croc or even just learning about our life-saving venom programs that save hundreds of lives every year.

“I couldn’t be prouder to see us doing better than ever in 2018. “We’re on track to see our biggest year yet and this holiday event is the best way to celebrate all of the Park’s achievements in tourism, animal education, conservation and venom programs,” Mr Faulkner said. The Australian Reptile Park has faced numerous challenges over the years that are now reflected on as hardships they were able to overcome. The park has faced a fire that destroyed most of the zoo in 2000, theft of various animals over the years, moving locations in 1996 and the death of Eric the Crocodile, a park icon, in 2008.

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2018/06/reptile-park-to-celebrate-60-years/

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The prospect of returning to work after years away from my career was daunting. I faced a host of challenges: a lack of recent and relevant experience, outdated corporate skills, and uncertainty about my Baby Boomer place in a Millennial-focused world.

I still thought, however, based upon my early career success and an advanced degree in my field, that I’d get a great offer in no time. It didn’t happen. My strategy—jumping into a role that was the wrong fit (and later leaving), followed by picking up consulting gigs here and there and then trying to explain it all in a resume with gaps and changes—was failing. I needed a strategic shift.

So I changed everything, from how I was approaching the job search process to my end goal. As a result, I applied for and landed a returnship, with Goldman Sachs. (If you’ve never heard of it, a returnship is an internship for people returning to the workforce.) It enabled me to add current and substantive experience to my resume, and reset my career path so I could once again move forward.

Here are the six most important lessons I learned in my quest to get back on track.

1. Update Your Online Presence
Being a somewhat tech-savvy boomer, I had a LinkedIn profile.

But too many people have ones that are lackluster or outdated. If that’s you, place this at the top of your to-do list. Both recruiters and hiring managers use the site to find and screen candidates.

I left off dates for my degrees to minimize age bias, and truncated my experience to the past 10 to 15 years (I recommend you do the same!).

2. Network—Always
You may think that networking is just for young professionals who need to meet new people. That’s simply not true. It’s beneficial regardless of your age.

For example, I had a friend put in a good word for me, and I know that helped me to be considered for the role at Goldman.

Here are four things you should start doing (if you’re not already):

Periodically touch base with professional contacts. Be memorable by sending a personal note and an interesting article once a month.
Let the other person know that you respect their time by being specific when you have an “ask.” Say (or write): “I’d really appreciate your perspective—can we speak/meet for 15 minutes?” And then stick with that time commitment.
Extend your network. Ask your contacts to connect you with their contacts.
Follow-up with a thank you note, every time. Take it to the next level by offering to be of help if they ever need your perspective or expertise.

3. Make it Easy for People to Help You
If you’re asking someone to refer you, give them everything they need, so they can simply send along your details.

So, if you’re applying to a role at their company, this includes the job name, job number, your resume, and bullets outlining what skills and experience you’d bring that match the requirements for the role.

People are busy, and so if you give them a complete email they can simply forward, it’s a lot more likely it’ll get passed on.

4. Refine Your Elevator Pitch
When you’ve had a lot of experience, it’s important (though often hard) to be clear about your objectives.

What are your areas of expertise?

What type of role are you looking for?

It’ll be tempting to rattle off everything you’ve done in the past, or say, “I can really do anything.” But a long speech can be overwhelming for listeners—and can make you look overqualified—and unfocused. So, cut it down and zero in on one thing you want the other person to come away with. My rule of thumb is that it should be no longer than 30 seconds.

5. Practice Self-Care
Unreturned emails, closed doors, and rejection all sting. But, it happens to pretty much everyone, especially when you’re outside the “sweet spot” of hiring prospects.

There’ll be surprises for better and worse: People that you’d have bet would be right there to help aren’t; and people you barely knew will do all they can.

So, it’s all the more important to be kind to yourself: go the gym, meet friends, and see a movie! That stuff may seem frivolous when you’re job searching, but it’ll help you feel happier—and keep you from letting your identity be wrapped up in your professional life.

6. Pay it Forward
Once you’ve landed in your new role, do what you can to help a colleague or friend of a friend. It could be at work, like offering to mentor junior employees.

Or, it could be that someone contacts you seeking your advice. Remember how you felt when you were job searching and do your best to find the time!

And of course, when you’re hiring in the future, give those who’ve had winding career paths a second look.

After my 10-week returnship program ended, I was asked to stay on for another year—and I did, happily. When my role recently came to an end, leaving Goldman Sachs was bittersweet.

But one thing that made me feel better is that I knew I was ready to find my next, more permanent position. On this search, I have not only a solid and recent accomplishment to leverage, but all of the lessons I’ve learned the last time around, as well as some new and treasured Millennial friends.

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/the-6-best-job-search-lessons-i-learned-after-10-years-away-best-of?ref=the-muse-editors-picks-1

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Lasercraft Australia is celebrating 30 years of operating a manufacturing business in West Gosford that employs disabled workers.

Lasercraft makes and sells corporate recognition awards, plaques and business gifts to major companies and government departments.
It also makes survey pegs for construction firms and surveyors.
It is a not-for-profit company and registered as a charity.
Revenue from its sales goes toward employment of supported workers with disabilities.

It currently employs 23 supported workers and provides training and workplace skills.
General Manager, Mr Peter Britton, said: “I love working with the supported workers.
“It is a delight to see them flower by gaining skills, having a normal work routine, increased socialisation and feeling accepted.

“Our aim is to create more places for supported workers, but this is only possible if we increase sales revenue.”
The supported workers are paid wages, and all have NDIS plans.

 

Source: https://coastcommunitynews.com.au/central-coast/news/2017/12/30-years-of-operating-a-manufacturing-business-that-employs-disabled-workers/