Employment

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The days when you had to put on a mask for work in the name of corporate conformity are over. They died with the wide-and-shiny neck tie, “kitchens” that looked like your dentist’s office, and other bad memories from yesteryear’s workplace.

Today’s workplace trades on inclusivity, empowerment, teamwork, and—in a word—realness.

Whatever your race, ethnicity, gender or sexual identity, it’s not only yours to embrace, but your employer’s. According to Deloitte’s 2017 Global Human Capital Trends report, 69% of executives say diversity and inclusion is an important issue. And that’s smart—because it’s good for business.

Recent research from Diversity Council Australia found that employees who work on inclusive teams are 10 times more likely to be highly effective than workers who don’t. They were also found to be more satisfied in their work, and studies have proven that happy employees are more productive.

So, it looks like it’s the perfect time to get real. Here are a few tips to make sure you can thrive as you at work.

Ask Upfront for a Diversity Onboarding

If you don’t identify as a white male (no shade if you do), chances are you have questions when entering a new workplace. What’s the policy to ensure women are paid as much as their male counterparts? Is there a mentorship program here and how can I find a mentor whose values align with my own? How can I help this company cultivate and hire diverse talent like myself?

Many reputable organizations will answer these as part of new-employee onboarding in the form of policies, videos, training, and general information. The goal should be to equip you with the knowledge and resources to work freely as your true self and ensure others can do the same.

If your new-hire briefing falls short of these expectations, don’t let your questions stew. Ask them. Doing so doesn’t mean you’re anticipating some sort of institutionalized discrimination (why would you join the company in that case?), it just means you’re curious and you’re looking forward to being part of progressive solutions to today’s workplace challenges.

Phrase questions to show that you’re curious about something meaningful to you and it’ll be easier to start the conversation: “I’m really passionate about women’s issues, I’d love to know what you do here to make sure women have access to leadership opportunities and equal pay?”

Join an Organization, or Start One

Whether you’re underrepresented at work or just have a really niche interest, joining a club—or starting one—is a great way to create space for the parts of you that don’t fit neatly into your job description.

Find groups that empower you—whether they’re creative or career development-oriented. The best part, clubs can fill voids if something you feel passionate about is not already reflected in your workplace. For example, if ladies aren’t exactly running the show (yet), a women’s group can be a great way to find support and mentorship. If people seem clueless when Pride rolls around, an LGBT+ alliance can change that.

If the group you’re looking to join doesn’t exist, consider starting it. Talk to HR or your manager and ask whether there’s a formal process in place to secure funding.

Be Aware of Your Biases, and Wake Others Up to Theirs

For better or for worse, we all carry unconscious biases. They’re woven into our minds from childhood and continue to proliferate in popular culture. These biases can affect our interpretations of and interactions with coworkers.

One of the best ways to be more self-actualized in the workplace is to help others be the same by granting them freedom from even small stereotypes and assumptions. Look into ways you can become more aware of your biases and spread the word to co-workers.

A few places to start: browse YouTube for bias exercises like this one, ask your colleagues for honest feedback, and pay close attention to your thoughts and reactions in groups (are you responding to hard facts and values, or assumptions and emotions?).

Grow Your Social Circle

Finally, it’s easier to be yourself if you’re among friends.

You can find them, but you may have to work for it. That means going to company events, grabbing coffee with new co-workers, switching your lunch crowd every so often, or hopping in new channels on Slack.

And try to connect with a range of coworkers, not just your immediate peers. You can learn from others who are different from you and who are in more senior or diverse roles. You may have to leave your comfort zone, but it’s well worth it—you’ll be more relaxed at work if you have a group of people supporting you.
Work should be inviting—not just because you like your work (although that’s a big plus), but because you can be yourself while you’re there. Whether your workplace is super progressive and has all the diversity and inclusion boxes checked, or you have to do some work to help get it there, use these tips to make your workday—and that of your coworkers’—more real.

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/bring-your-whole-self-to-work?ref=recently-published-1

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You spend the last few months of 2017 saying, “Next year will be different.” And now it’s next year and you can’t really say that anything’s changed. You know what you want—it’s just that the closer you get to going after it, the more unsure you are.

You’re not alone in this feeling. But, instead of continuing to find every flaw in your idea, let’s first make sure that you’re not overthinking every step.

 

1. Every Time You Think About Doing Something Awesome in Your Career, You Immediately Think “I Shouldn’t…”

Are there times when something isn’t right? Sure, of course. But if every time you see an opportunity, you immediately think “I shouldn’t” or “I can’t” then you’re definitely overthinking it.

Here’s what to do instead: Let’s put your amazingly smart brain to action, and think about all the reasons why you actually can do something.

For instance: You think to yourself “Ugh, I’m way overdue for a raise. But I shouldn’t ask for one, I don’t want to be that person and I know my boss is busy.”

Which leads to you feeling terrible and nothing good happening.

Instead, why not try a phrase that starts with “I can” and is followed by “Here’s how.”

Let me give you an example. Start by saying: “I can ask for a raise.” And then add: “Here’s how: I’ll start by writing down all of the work I’ve done and make my case on paper. Then I can also make sure I schedule a time that works for her, so it won’t be a problem to sit down and have a conversation about this. Finally, I can focus on the fact that asking for a raise is a normal thing to do, as long as I’m polite and focused and positive, things will be OK.”

The combination of those two phrases does something magical to your brain. It distracts you from all the reasons why not, and gets you thinking about the good stuff like how it can be possible.

2. Whenever Your Friends Ask About Your Career, You Change the Subject

Have you ever been out with your friends, and someone asks you “How that’s job search going?” And you mumble something quickly and immediately move to another topic?

You aren’t alone! Frankly, we’ve all been there. Sometimes you just aren’t ready to talk about a big career move.

And sometimes you’re just plain scared of change, so instead of facing up to the fact that you’re beyond overdue, you keep changing the subject.

So, to determine which camp you fall into, ask yourself this question: “Is this just a tough moment, or am I honestly avoiding this question all the time?”

If the answer is “I’m avoiding this all the time” then chances are you’re over-thinking your next step and it’s time to face up to the fact that it’s 100% okay to ask for a raise, or to meet with your boss to talk about a promotion, or to even want a completely different job.

Usually, we dread the idea of something more than the thing itself, so the easiest way over the hump is to talk about your next steps with someone you trust. Even saying something like “I really want to change jobs, but I’m terrified of ending up unemployed” can help you move past the analysis paralysis and into action.

And action is where the magic happens.

3. You Endlessly Research Options, But Can’t Seem to Make Yourself Actually Do Anything

Have you ever researched…and researched…and researched…

And just when you feel like you have a solution or an idea for your career, you decide the right answer is “more research.”

You know, just to be safe.

If your answer to “What’s next in my career?” is always “more research” then you’re definitely over-thinking and it’s time for action.

Here’s what you do: Commit to researching two to three good options, and once you have your options in hand, it’s time to take action on them, instead of going back for more information.

So, for example, here’s what that can look like: You decide you want a new job. So you research several different companies but you can’t make yourself apply.

Instead of going back for more research, review all of the work you’ve done to date and then choose your best two options in terms of potential companies. Commit to applying to jobs at both. Don’t panic! Applying doesn’t mean “taking” but it does mean making progress.

 

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/signs-overthinking-career-change-new-job?ref=the-muse-editors-picks-2

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When I first started working, I never understood why people hated meetings so much. I love people, I love brainstorming conversations, and I love an excuse to not stare at my computer for several hours—how could they not be anything but great?

Of course, over time, I started to understand why they get a bad rap. Take away the fact that most meetings are inefficient, if not unproductive and a waste of time, it takes around 23 minutes and 15 seconds to get focused back on what you were working on before a meeting (which is why we’re big fans of turning unnecessary ones into emails).

As someone who’s (and knows many people who have also) had days of back-to-back meetings, I know how tough it can be to get all your other work done. Here are some tips for how to get through the day the best you can, if cancelling isn’t an option.

The Day Before

Prep for the Meeting
Chances are you know a couple days ahead of time when you’re going to have a day full of meetings. So, use that prep time to get organized.

Make sure you have everything you need to present or run each meeting. If you’re an attendee, go over any documents or agendas your colleagues have sent out to get a sense of what you need to bring and what’ll be discussed (if you have none of this, ask for it!).

Knowing what’s coming up will save you from scrambling day of to find files, or track down information, or waste any mental energy on being shocked at what you’re learning

Get Work Done Ahead of Time
Look at what you have coming up the day after the meeting. Is there anything you can get done in advance? By working through your lunch or staying just 30 minutes later than usual the day before, you can knock off some tasks and not end your meeting-filled-day feeling like you’re way behind.

Plan on How You’ll Take Advantage of Those Bits of In-between Time
Sometimes meetings end early. Sometimes they start late. And sometimes they get cancelled. (And sometimes the presenter spends the first 10 minutes trying to hook up their computer.)

Get ready to use those spare moments wisely.

Make a list of everything that can be done in under five minutes. Then turn to that list (and not social media) when you find yourself with minutes to spare.

Block Off Any Free Time You Do Have
Another no-brainer trick is to physically block off any time you have between meetings on your calendars.

The Day Of

Work in the Meeting (When Possible)
OK, I’m not giving you permission to not listen in the meeting, but I also realize that everyone does this at some point. And I also know that fires come up that you have to address, no matter how important the discussion is.

So, if there’s a lull in the conversation, you’re merely an observer in the meeting, or you’re certain you’re not needed in that moment, I give you permission to tackle any of those low-hanging fruits on occasion—whether it’s responding to a Slack, answering an important client email, or filling out a quick document.

Actually Eat Lunch
If it’s not completely taboo in your office, please eat lunch during the meeting. And, take bathroom breaks, even if it means leaving in the middle or running late to the next one. Oh, and, bring water and a snack with you so you don’t feel famished or dehydrated.

This will help keep your energy up so you can tackle stuff later on (more on that below).

Plan on it Being a Long Day
If your day’s going to be completely packed, then it might be worth getting into the mindset that you probably won’t be leaving when you ideally want to. It sucks to have to work outside your regular hours, but knowing that it’s coming will make it a little less painful.

Cancel Your Plans That Night
With that said, don’t make your day longer by having after-work plans. Not only will this put a deadline on how late you can work, but it’ll also just mean you end the day more exhausted than necessary. Instead, make it a self-care night that’s relaxing and stress-free.

Get in Early
Set your alarm a bit earlier than usual and get to the office before everyone else. This leaves you with plenty of distraction-free time to focus before the day really starts. And this goes for night owls too—even if you get in early and just spend the first hour making a to-do list for the day, you’ll feel better.

The Day After

Avoid This in the Future
You can try following these tips to cut down how many meetings you have to attend in the future.

Or, going back to the whole “blocking off your calendar idea,” you can make sure you block off two to three hours every day for your work. This helps to ensure that you will almost always have time to work. While you’ll of course have to move those blocks to accommodate other people and deadlines, it’s a great start.

No doubt about it that having a meeting-full day stinks. However, it’s not impossible to survive a day like this and still do your job (after all, if I can do it, you can, too).

 

Source:https://www.themuse.com/advice/how-to-survive-meetings-still-do-work?ref=recently-published-1

bad habits
  • Nobody’s perfect – most of us have picked up a bad habit or two at some point.
  • Most of the time, a bad habit won’t wreck your whole life.
  • Still, it’s probably best to avoid these success-sabotaging tendencies.

Bad habits may not seem like a big deal on their own, but sometimes they can seriously drag you down in your life and career.

Of course, no one is perfect. In most cases, bad habits only result in relatively minor problems. So if you recognise one of these compulsions as your own, you probably have nothing to worry about.

However, in more extreme cases, certain tendencies can actually thwart you dreams of success.

Here are the top nine habits of unsuccessful people:

1. You’re always tardy

Sure, things happen, but consistent tardiness is typically unacceptable in a professional setting. Showing up late makes you look careless and unreliable.

As Laura Schocker wrote for the Huffington Post, one San Francisco State University study linked ” chronic lateness and certain personality characteristics, including anxiety, low self-control and a tendency toward thrill-seeking.”

2. You hold grudges

You don’t need to walk around singing kumbaya. It’s fine and normal to dislike and distrust certain people in your life.

But holding intense grudges is just a waste of your valuable time and energy. In an article for Web MD, Mike Fillon cited one Hope College study that found that holding a grudge can even have negative health effects.

So learn to let things go.

3. You conform

Conforming was a survival tactic in middle school, but you’re an adult with a career now. Stop caring intently about what others think and falling in line just for the sake of getting along. Do what works for you.

If you devote all your time to blending in, you’ll never stand out.

4. You overspend

If money’s always burning a hole in your pocket, you’re setting yourself up for longterm financial woes. Saving money is crucial for your financial future.

Beat this habit by learning to identify psychological triggers for overspending.

5. You procrastinate

I’ll tell you all about the downsides of procrastination later.

Just kidding. Seriously, though, indecisiveness could lose you time, money, and even the respect of those around you.

6. You lie

This one’s pretty simple. Be honest. It’s easy to fall into the trap of weaving small untruths that stretch into bigger and bigger lies. Break that habit.

Yeah, there are horror stories about cheats and liars who schemed their way to the top. But that doesn’t mean you should develop a dishonest streak yourself.

7. You burn bridges

Listen, in life and your career, it’s necessary to burn some bridges, if the person on the other side is toxic. However, those cases should be the exception, not the rule. As you move through different phases of your career, don’t alienate the people you come into contact with.

That could seriously come back to bite you if you cross paths with them later on.

8. You don’t take care of yourself

You could have all the success in the world, but it won’t mean much for long if you don’t maintain your health. Don’t allow stress to drive you to neglect exercise, eat poorly, and neglect yourself. Sooner or later, those choices will catch up to you and might just derail your life.

9. You have bad body language

Body language makes a big difference in how people perceive us – it’s often more important than what you verbally say.

That’s why bad body language habits – like poor eye contact and slumping posture – are so damaging. You could be sabotaging your opportunities before you even open your mouth.
Source: https://www.businessinsider.com/habits-of-unsuccessful-people-2018-1#ymbcO3ZCmgfXQsYY.99

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Hunter Young Professionals (hyp) is seeking community champions, thought leaders and change agents for their 2018 board.

The local networking organisation specifically targeting young professionals is looking for individuals who are passionate about their cause to join the organisation with enthusiasm, desire and focus.

President, James Callender said a position on the hyp board provides opportunities to challenge one’s self, meet new people, learn new skills and advocate for the growth and direction of our local community.

 “2017 has been a strong year for hyp. Our membership continues to grow as young professionals gravitate towards the annual learning journey that we facilitate. The 2017 impact journey featuring local and national keynote speakers saw record event attendance and new venue activation,” James said.

“We have come a long way this year and we are looking forward to seeing and experiencing where the new board will take the organisation in 2018.”

Nominees for the 2018 hyp board are expected to combine their acquired skill set with a desire to learn, collaborate, facilitate and grow as a professional. The organisation supports four key focus areas of communications, events, membership and sponsorship.

To be eligible to nominate for a board position and vote at the Annual General Meeting (AGM), it is a constitutional requirement that you are a registered voting member of HYP and between the age of 18 and 40. HYP membership is free.

Nominations are open for the 2018 Hunter Young Professionals board until 31 December. Voting will take place at the organisation’s AGM on Tuesday 30 January 2018 at Queens Wharf Hotel.

“If you want 2018 to be a year of change, challenge, reward and recognition, nominate yourself for the hyp Board,” James said.

“It’s a chance to learn, contribute to the community and inspire others.”

 

Source: http://www.hunterheadline.com.au/hh/business-news/trailblazers-wanted-hunter-young-professionals-board/

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Meetings are expensive. Not because you’re charging people to attend (obviously), but because they use people’s time; time that could be spent doing lots of other revenue-generating things. In fact, one study found that a recurring meeting of mid-level managers was costing one company $15 million a year!.

$15 million a year!

Not to mention, you also need to take into account the prep time as well as the context-switching time. Professor Gloria Mark at University of California, Irvine found that it takes an average of 25 minutes for a worker to return to their original task after an interruption.

Knowing these stats means that when I’m debating whether I need to call a meeting, I ask myself what it’s worth (literally). Is this the best use of everyone’s time, mine included? And not so infrequently, the answer is “nope.”

So, what to do then? Easy! Send a simple but critical email to keep everyone informed and on track.

What to Include

There are three key things you need to cover:

Logistics: why the meeting was canceled and, if it’s a recurring meeting, what to expect for next time
Action: any critical action items completed or pending
Information: any updates or general FYIs for the group

Note: Don’t fall into the trap of putting the action items and logistics last. Having the most critical information higher up ensures that it’s seen when your colleagues skim their email. Oh, and a bonus tip for you: Put people’s names in bold if they need to do anything to make triple sure they notice.

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/turn-meeting-into-an-email-template

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You’ve likely heard the advice to add numbers to your resume bullets. It helps recruiters really picture the impact you’ve made in your position, and it frankly just sounds more impressive.

See for yourself: Which person would you hire?

Person 1: Duties included taking field measurements and maintaining records, setting up and tracking project using Microsoft Project, and developing computerized material take-off sheets.

Person 2: Initiated and managed tracking systems used for the Green District water decontamination project, saving $125,000 on the overall project through a 30% decrease of staff allocation time.

Exactly.

Of course, I know what you might be thinking: Sounds great, but what if I just don’t really work with hard numbers? Maybe you’re in a role that requires softer skills, or maybe you don’t have hard data or sales reports to pull from.

That’s OK! Truthfully, no matter what you do, you can add some numbers and data to your resume to give it that extra touch.

Here are three ways to quantify your experience without being in an inherently quant-y field:

1. Range

Not knowing the exact figure for things is often a big deterrent for using numbers in resumes. But one way to overcome this is to use a range.

It’s perfectly fine to not know exactly how many clients you see a month or how many calls you take a week, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t still quantify it.

Give it your best estimate, and the range will show that there is a bit of leeway. And, of course, focus on your impact.

2. Frequency

Now that you know it’s fine to use a range, one of the easiest ways to add some numbers is to include how frequently you do a particular task (after all, that’s a number that applies to pretty much everyone).

This is particularly helpful in illustrating your work in high-volume situations—a hiring manager will be able to see just how much you can handle.

3. Scale

You’ve heard it before and you’ll hear it again: Employers across the board care about money—and saving it. Including the frequency of your actions give a great sense of scale, but an even more eye-catching way to do this is to talk about the bottom line.

Think about all the things you do that ultimately save your company money, whether it’s streamlining a procedure, saving time, or negotiating discounts with vendors. Multiply those actions by how frequently you do them, and pop them into your resume bullets (remembering, again, that rough numbers are OK).

Numbers make such a huge difference in resumes—no matter what your work involves.

So, the next time you’re polishing your resume, try adding a few numbers to quantify your work and see how they really drive home the impact you’re capable of making.
Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/how-to-quantify-your-resume-bullets-when-you-dont-work-with-numbers?ref=carousel-slide-1

interview q

“Do you have any questions for us?”

You’ll be asked it in almost any interview. And while you may be tempted to sit back and relax during this portion—while the recruiter’s put in the hot seat—that’s not actually in your best interest.

Why? Because this is your final chance to make an awesome impression.

My team and I interview around 100,000 people a year so, as you can imagine, we always take notice when someone asks a question besides “What’s a typical day like?” or “When will I hear back from you?”

In fact, you shouldn’t be afraid to grill hiring managers during this portion of the conversation. Chances are, they’re hoping you will.

To help get you started, here are some of the super-smart questions I’ve been asked during actual interviews by real-life candidates–and the reasons they got my attention.

1. “Who Does the Wireframing for Your Site?”

OK, that’s clearly specific to a certain role. But I’m using this one as an example of a question you can ask that places you in the role you’ve applied for.

This question came from a prospective designer. We got talking about a new internal website we were developing and he asked, “Who does the wireframing for your website, the design team or a specific UX team?”

We ended up having a great discussion about our processes and how he could contribute to the development of the project. I remember thinking it was like we were already working together. And, from his perspective, he got a great insight into the way we work across teams and who has responsibility for what.

2. “Why Does This Role Matter to the Growth of the Company?”

Talk about putting the ball back in my court! This question showed me the candidate was interested in more than just what I thought of him then and there, in the interview. She wanted to make an impact beyond her own role or team and get a feel for how she’d fit into the future plans of the business.

And, from a candidate perspective, it’s a great way to help you see whether the role you’ve applied for will be a high or low-profile position. It also gives you an indication of what’s expected of the person who fills that role.

3. “Could I Meet Some of the People I’d Be Working With?”

I’ve been asked this a few times—especially more recently—and it’s a great question. (And one that we always try to accommodate.) It shows me the candidate understands the importance of cultural fit and team dynamics and that it matters to them. This is clearly not a person who wants to come to work, sit down at their desk every day, and work in a solitary bubble with their headphones on.

Plus, if you want to get a sense of whether you’ll enjoy being around the people you could be working with every day, this is the question you should ask.

4. “Why Has the Person in This Role Decided to Leave?” / “Who Had This Role Before?”

This can be a very revealing question! Why is the position you’ve applied for available? Is it because the previous person has been promoted or moved to a different team? Both of which would suggest that this job would set you up for progression.

Or, did the person leave to join another company? Or because they didn’t meet expectations? If the recruiter hesitates or becomes evasive, that could tell you everything you need to know! Equally, stay alert and if you sense it’s time to move the conversation on, gently change the subject to something else or ask a new question that’s easier to answer.

5. “What Do You Like Most About Working Here?”

I’ve only been asked this once, believe it or not. It was by a candidate who’d just finished giving a very competent response to the question, “Why do you want to work here?”

I loved the way she tossed this question right back at me. And, although it took me a few seconds to think how to respond, we ended up having a great conversation about how rewarding a career at J&J can be, both personally and professionally.

As a candidate, it’s the perfect question to catch the recruiter a little off-guard and get an honest answer. Regardless of what they say, you can probably gauge how they truly feel about their company, which gives you another indication of whether it’s the right fit for you.

6. “Do You Have Any Reservations About Me or My Qualifications?”

A seriously gutsy question! So gutsy that I was impressed by the confidence of the candidate who asked it. You might think you’re setting your self-esteem up for a knocking. But it’s actually very smart.

A question like this gives you the chance to address any concerns the recruiter may have about your fit for the role head-on, in person. In the instance I’m thinking of, the candidate was actually able to mitigate the concerns I had about a large, unexplained gap on his resume. It transpired he’d taken an unpaid sabbatical to care for his infant daughter while his wife went back to college.

Sure, it takes some gumption to ask. But why allow a potentially unfounded reservation turn into a reason to give someone else the job ahead of you?

7. “How Do You Deal With Professional Disagreements Within the Team? Can You Give Me an Example?”

Another question that shows a recruiter that they’re talking to a candidate who cares about team dynamics and understands that how a team works together can make or break the success of its projects.

For you as a candidate, it’s an incredibly useful way to find out whether you’ll be joining a team of ‘yes-men’ or whether respectful (emphasis on respectful!) disagreements are encouraged to ensure all avenues are explored and that company goals are put ahead of egos. Providing the interviewer answers honestly, it also gives you an indication of inter-team dynamics.
As a recruiter, I’ve heard a lot of awesome questions (such as these)—and some I bet the candidate regretted instantly! But, with a little preparation, there’s no need to feel anxious about this part of an interview.

The hiring manager knows you want to figure out if the role is right for you so they’ll be expecting questions. And by taking a couple of the examples above and modifying them to fit your own situation, I can almost guarantee you’re going to instigate some really valuable discussions that help you (both!) to make the right decision about the role.

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/out-of-100000-interviews-these-7-candidate-questions-stood-out

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The Hunter Region’s lack of highly-paid jobs could be greatly improved with a much bigger injection of state infrastructure funding, a leading academic says.

This lack of higher incomes meant less consumption and less opportunity, University of Western Sydney Professor Phillip O’Neill said

Only 6 per cent of Hunter residents earn more than $2000 a week, Australian Bureau of Statistics data shows.

The Hunter is slightly ahead of its regional neighbour, the Central Coast, an area where 5 per cent of citizens earn that kind of money.

In Sydney’s eastern suburbs, 17 per cent of people make more than $2000 a week.

Professor O’Neill, who teaches geography and urban studies, said there was an absence in the Hunter of “very highly paid professional services occupations, in particular law and finance”.

The decline of heavy industry like BHP and the sale of coal mines to global corporations added to a lack of senior positions, he said.

An exodus of senior positions in the region’s public sector since the 1980s and 1990s was also a factor.

Professor O’Neill said the Hunter had its positives, including a world-class university and TAFE, but “a lot of graduates from those institutions are forced to leave the region” to get good jobs.

Other attractive attributes included Newcastle Airport, the M1 motorway and Newcastle’s harbourside location.

But by world standards, the region was not competitive enough, he said.

He said it was difficult to think of any solution, other than a concerted government effort to attract a core of quality employers.

“There are good lessons in Australia to how governments can build concentrations of work,” he said.

“One is the Barangaroo project in Sydney.”

He said the NSW government had built infrastructure and partnered with the private sector to create this precinct.

“Barangaroo will yield 25,000 high-quality professional services jobs,” he said.

“If it takes that sort of effort to generate that number of jobs on the edge of Sydney Harbour in the middle of a global city, why would governments think that jobs can somehow spring up spontaneously in a regional city without similar effort?”

While the NSW government is spending $650 million to revitalise Newcastle, it is spending much more at Barangaroo.

Additionally, it is spending billions on the Sydney Metro rail system, which will have a station at Barangaroo.

“Every successful professional services conglomeration has excellent amenity for workers and high-speed transport and telecommunications connections,” Professor O’Neill, who lives in the Hunter, said.

Investment in Newcastle was “unbalanced because it’s biased towards residential”.

“It’s high quality residential and, no doubt, it’s the type of development that would attract qualified young professionals,” he said.

“But we don’t see the type of commercial and infrastructure development that significant employers would be looking for to invest in downtown Newcastle.”

As such, apartments would more likely attract retirees than workers, he said.

Newcastle City Council said it had, for years, been working with Hunter Development Corporation, Urban Growth and the Department of Planning to revitalise the city centre.

“Council has also examined the future role of Wickham, adjacent to the new commercial core, through the recently released master plan for the suburb,” a spokesman said.

“The vision sees Wickham evolving into a diverse and dynamic mixed-use precinct.

“As part of the master plan, proposals are being considered to increase building heights along the rail corridor to help promote the growth of employment opportunities, including service industries.”

Professor O’Neill said the Hunter was evolving into “a broader service-based economy”.

“The sorts of jobs that are typical of a population-based service sector aren’t highly-paid positions,” he said.

“They also include a higher proportion of casual and part-time positions.

“This gives you a larger number of people in the $20,000 to $30,000 a year bracket – almost certainly they are part-time and casual workers.”

The ABS figures show that 30 per cent of Hunter residents earn $15,600 to $41,600 a year.

Professor O’Neill said the coal industry had provided numerous jobs worth more than $100,000 over the last decade.

“Those coal numbers have backed away in recent years,” he said.

“There isn’t a high concentration of occupations in the Hunter that pay in excess of $100,000 per annum, at least as far as wages and salary earners are concerned.

“If anything, the likelihood of finding those jobs is diminishing.”

Source: http://www.theherald.com.au/story/4941580/how-newcastle-could-attract-the-big-bucks-photos-poll/

yoga

Yoga is often bandied about as something for the ultra hip but one group of dedicated yogis is using the practice to help frontline workers combat the ongoing stress of their professions.

Frontline Yoga offers free classes to those who serve on the frontline — from defence members to emergency services workers.

The charity is based in the Hunter Valley in New South Wales, but yoga teachers from all over Australia are now learning the Frontline principles so they can offer classes in their towns too.

“We ask the yoga teachers to stand at the front of the class and be predictable in their movements.

“Students are free to keep their eyes open, to get up and walk out of the class and we also have [students] facing the door.”

The guidelines have been created in collaboration with frontline workers who were coincidentally attending yoga classes.

“I had feedback about the subtle but ongoing benefits in their lives,” Ms O’Donoghue said.

“I started thinking if it was working so well for this particular group, surely there’s a lot of other industries working with stress and exposure to trauma who could benefit.”

Personal experience

Ms O’Donoghue said she used her personal exposure to front line work to inform her classes.

“My foster father was the state commissioner for St Johns [and] my [biological] father was really quite severely impacted by PTSD.

“As a child you just adapt and modify [and] I was always striving to make him more comfortable.”

Ms O’Donoghue said Frontline Yoga was battling to change the stigma around mental health.

“I don’t see a broken person, I don’t see a helpless person,” she said.

“I’m amazed. If that person could have done one activity that day — and maybe that is the only activity they’re doing — and they’ve chosen to come to my yoga class, I can’t help but be completely overwhelmed with gratitude.”

Former RAAF combat engineer Chris Thompson-Lang has trained as a yoga teacher to help with his own PTSD and depression and is a co-founder of Frontline Yoga.

“I came to start practicing yoga in Canberra two years after returning from Afghanistan,” he said.

“Things weren’t going well for me — I’d had a marriage breakdown, I was struggling with my personal connections and drinking a lot.

“[Yoga] is something that I need to stay focused on because if I stop practising, I go back to some of my old habits and I do notice that spiral.

“It takes a fair bit of self-discipline but fortunately, the military gave me that and it’s something we can all take with us.”

Source: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-09-14/yoga-helping-frontline-workers-combat-mental-health-issues/8944556

jobs people

When you are thinking about career options, it can be helpful to know where the jobs will be.

Australia’s population is changing. The population is getting older, more females are in paid work, and the number of school aged children is growing. Demand is likely to grow for aged care, childcare, home based care, and education services.

Housing construction, investment in infrastructure (like roads, railways and airports), tourism activity and the international education sector are expected to stay strong.

The number and type of JOB OPENINGS available in the future will depend on things like

  • turnover (workers leaving their job to do things like study, move to another job, care for a family member, retire or travel)
  • demand for goods and services
  • demand for resources
  • changes in technology

Industry Outlook
Over the 5 years to 2020, the department expects the LARGEST JOBS GROWTH will be in

  • Health Care and Social Assistance
  • Professional, Scientific and Technical Services
  • Education and Training

By 2020, there will probably be FEWER JOBS in

  • Manufacturing
  • Mining
  • Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing

These are important industries and turnover will provide opportunities for workers with the right skills.
Some parts of these industries (like Food Product Manufacturing) are expected to grow.

Career Outlook
The department expects there will be many new jobs for Professionals, Community and Personal Service Workers.

Some of the JOBS EXPECTED TO GROW the most are

  • Registered Nurses
  • Aged and Disabled Carers
  • Accountants
  • Electricians

Some jobs need more training now than they used to (like Child Carers in day care centres), and most of the new jobs created over the next few years will be higher skilled. There are millions of lower skilled jobs and these can be rewarding careers or pathways to other jobs.

Employer needs can change quickly. Workers who are willing to learn, gain experience and build their skills will be well placed to find and keep a job.

Source: http://joboutlook.gov.au/FutureOfWork.aspx

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Local engineering company Varley Group has secured the contract to unload cargos of wind turbines from ships arriving at Newcastle Port.

The contract win comes after the shipping company caved to community pressure and agreed to stop using Singaporean workers to unload the ships.

“As the wind turbine parts are welded to the deck of the ship, this is specialised work that calls for specialised metal workers to ensure safety,” Federal member for Newcastle Sharon Claydon said.

“It was always outrageous to deploy a fly-in crew from Singapore to unload ships at our port when there is an abundance of skilled workers right here in Newcastle.

“The Australian Manufacturing Workers Union, the Maritime Union of Australia, workers and community members united to send a clear message that this behaviour is not acceptable in Newcastle.”

Source: http://www.theherald.com.au/story/4863141/varley-group-wins-contract-to-use-local-workers/

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“Where do you see yourself in five years?”

When a hiring manager asks you this, there may be a few things running through your brain. “Moving (way) up the ranks,” “running this place,” “working for myself,” or “in your job,” for example.

None of which are necessarily things you should say out loud in an interview.

So, how do you answer the question? Watch this quick video, where Muse CEO Kathryn Minshew shares a formula developed by our career expert Lily Zhang. It’ll help you share your goals and ambitions the right way—and not give your interviewer anything to worry about.

(Can’t watch the video at work? Don’t worry—we’ve also copied the transcript below.)

How to Answer “Where Do You See Yourself in 5 Years?”

So, how do you answer, “Where do you see yourself in five years?”

This can feel like a bit of a trick question, because sometimes the answer is, “not in this job,” or, “in your job,” or something like, “at a bigger better opportunity elsewhere.” But none of those are things you actually want to say to a hiring manager.

The good news is you can be honest while still telling them what they really want to know. Do you have realistic expectations for your career? Are you ambitious? And does this particular position align with your growth and goals overall?

For example, one way I like to think about it is: Think about where this position could realistically take you, and think about how that aligns with some of your broader professional goals.

So, for example, you might say, “Well I’m really excited by this position at Midnight Consulting because in five years, I’d like to be seen as someone with deep expertise in the energy sector, and I know that’s something that I’ll have an opportunity to do here. I’m also really excited to take on more managerial responsibilities in the next few years and potentially even take the lead on some projects. I’ve been lucky enough to work with some amazing managers, and so developing into a great manager myself is something I’m really excited about.”

So, what if this position is not a one-way ticket to your professional aspirations? It’s okay to say you don’t really know what the future holds, but you see how this experience could really help in making that decision.

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/how-to-answer-where-do-you-see-yourself-in-5-years?ref=carousel-slide-1

mining

Things are looking up for Hunter mining, and that means growth, investment and jobs.

Just over 12 months ago, the commodity markets turned upward, including a significant rise in the price of both thermal and coking coal.

This resurgence in the coal price has driven healthy economic activity in the Hunter, as lower production costs secured during the downturn have boosted productivity and helped miners lock in the benefits of rising prices.

In a further boost for Hunter mining, the rise in commodity prices has been complemented by a strong ongoing demand for local coal. The 2016 Port of Newcastle export figures highlight the strong global demand for our coal, with record tonnage exported through the Port last year.

China increased imports of NSW coal by almost 9 per cent to over 24 million tonnes in 2016. Chinese demand for NSW coal has grown strongly in the past six years – from just 1 per cent of NSW coal exports in 2007 to 14 per cent of all NSW coal exports within a decade.

This growing demand has continued into 2017, with Coal Services data showing exports to China in April 2017 already up 29 per cent compared with the same time last year.

Demand for Hunter coal is also increasing across a range of other Asian markets. This reflects the deployment of more coal-fired power generation capacity across the region, including new advanced technology High Efficiency Low Emissions coal-fired power plants. For example, there was a 71 per cent increase in the volume of NSW coal exported to the Philippines in 2016, and a 12 per cent increase in exports to Thailand.

After several tough years of a cyclical downturn, the recovery has boosted activity and confidence in the Hunter mining sector. Several mines previously on care and maintenance have re-opened, and a number of expansion projects have been approved recently in the Hunter.

Importantly, we’re seeing improved business conditions and a return of confidence in the sector translate into jobs.

Coal Services figures show an increase of almost 700 coal mining production jobs in the Hunter since the recovery in prices began to take hold in August last year. Across NSW, the almost 20,000 coal production jobs recorded in April 2017 was the highest level since the end of 2015.

This positive jobs growth is extremely welcome, particularly in the Hunter. It will boost confidence and economic growth and stimulate additional employment across the almost 3700 Hunter businesses that supply the mining industry.

With rising demand for our coal across traditional markets and the emerging markets of Southeast Asia, there will be growing economic opportunities for the Hunter, provided we get the policy settings right in NSW.

The NSW Government has made progress in meeting its commitment to halve planning assessment times for major mining projects. While there is still more be done, if we can lock in policies that support the mining sector in the Hunter we can build on these positive export figures, attract more investment, and create more jobs.

Source: http://www.theherald.com.au/story/4821970/resurgence-of-mining-delivers-jobs/

Bluemercury ceo

Many of the most successful people have gotten job interviews down to a science.

They’re not in the habit of wasting time with dumb or irrelevant queries.

In fact, they often have one favourite go-to question they like to ask. This typically reveals everything they need to know about a job candidate.

Check out the questions 10 business leaders love to ask candidates:

Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk

According to the biography ‘Elon Musk: Tesla, SpaceX, and the Quest for a Fantastic Future,’ the Tesla and SpaceX CEO likes to ask candidates this riddle to test their intelligence.

There are multiple correct answers, and one is the North Pole.

Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh

One of Zappos’ core values is to ‘create fun and a little weirdness,’ Tony Hsieh, CEO of the company, tells Business Insider.

To make sure he hires candidates with the right fit, Hsieh typically asks the question: ‘On a scale of one to 10, how weird are you?’ He says the number isn’t too important, but it’s more about how people answer the question. Nonetheless, if ‘you’re a one, you probably are a little bit too straight-laced for the Zappos culture,’ he says. ‘If you’re a 10, you might be too psychotic for us.’

Another question Zappos usually asks candidates is: ‘On a scale of one to 10, how lucky are you in life?’ Again, the number doesn’t matter too much, but if you’re a one, you don’t know why bad things happen to you (and probably blame others a lot). And if you’re a 10, you don’t understand why good things always seem to happen to you (and probably lack confidence).

Facebook HR chief Lori Goler

Business Insider previously spoke with Lori Goler, Facebook’s president of people operations, about how the social media giant recruits top talent. That’s what this question is all about — on a perfect day at work, what activities allowed you to ‘get in the zone’ and do great work.

She recommends that people interested in working for Facebook apply to roles that play to their strengths:

‘They should just apply,’ Goler told Business Insider. ‘We hire people every day who just apply to the website. We love meeting people that way. Jump right in.’

Paypal co-founder and Clarium Capital President Peter Thiel

PayPal cofounder, managing partner of the Founders Fund, and president of Clarium Capital Peter Thiel always looks to hire people who aren’t afraid to speak their minds, reports Business Insider’s Aaron Taube.

To do this, he always gives job candidates and the founders of companies seeking an investment this interview prompt: ‘Tell me something that’s true, that almost nobody agrees with you on.”

In a 2012 interview with Forbes, Thiel said the reason he loves this question is: ‘It sort of tests for originality of thinking, and to some extent, it tests for your courage in speaking up in a difficult interview context.’

Virgin Group founder Richard Branson

Virgin Group founder Richard Branson explains in his new book ‘The Virgin Way: Everything I Know About Leadership,’ that he isn’t a fan of the traditional job interview, reports Business Insider’s Richard Feloni.

‘Obviously a good CV is important, but if you were going to hire by what they say about themselves on paper, you wouldn’t need to waste time on an interview,’ Branson writes. That’s why he likes to ask: What didn’t you get a chance to include on your résumé?

Dropbox founder Drew Houston

Drew Houston, the 33-year-old billionaire founder of Dropbox, tells Adam Bryant of The New York Times that he has five questions he always likes to ask job candidates:

1. Who is the best in the world at what you do?

2. Who are your influences?

3. What have you learned in the last year?

4. If you were able to sit yourself down 10 years ago, what advice would you give your younger self?

5. What are the most important lessons you’ve taken away?

As Business Insider previously reported, Houston explains that these questions help him discern if a candidate is passionate about constantly improving. ‘I’m drawn to people who really love their craft, and treat it like a craft, and are always trying to be better and are obsessed with what separates great from good,’ he tells Bryant.

Paramore founder and EVP Hannah Paramore

Hannah Paramore, president of Paramore, a Nashville-based interactive advertising agency, told the New York Times’ Adam Bryant that this is one of her favourite questions.

‘I’m looking for how deeply instilled their work ethic and independence are versus entitlement,’ she tells Business Insider. ‘If they worked part time in high school and college because they needed to, especially in jobs that were just hard work, that shows a huge level of personal responsibility. I love people who have to patch success together from a number of different angles.’

Charlotte Russe president and CEO Jenny Ming

Tell me about your failures.  A good answer to this question is important because it means that the candidate isn’t afraid of taking risks and will admit when things don’t work out, says Jenny Ming, president and CEO of clothing store Charlotte Russe and former chief executive of Old Navy.

‘It doesn’t even have to be business; it could be life lessons. I think it’s pretty telling. What did they do afterward?’ she says. ‘How did they overcome that? I always look for somebody who’s very comfortable admitting when something didn’t work out.’

People always like to tell you about their successes, she explains, but they don’t always want to tell you what didn’t work out so well for them.

Bluemercury CEO Marla Malcolm Beck

As Business Insider previously reported, luxury beauty retailer Bluemercury CEO Marla Malcolm Beck’s interviews tend to only take seven to 10 minutes.

She has on query she likes to ask in particular, she previously told Adam Bryant of The New York Times.

Her question for potential hires is: ‘What’s the biggest impact you had at your past organisation?’

‘It’s important that someone takes ownership of a project that they did, and you can tell based on how they talk about it whether they did it or whether it was just something that was going on at the organisation,’ she told Bryant.

Jigsaw head of research and development Yasmin Green

Yasmin Green, head of research and development at Jigsaw, Alphabet’s tech incubator formerly known as Google Ideas, wants to hire creative, independent thinkers, so she gets candidates to think on their feet by asking them how they’d manage an imaginary ice-cream stand.

‘I’m curious to see how people deal with ambiguity and whether they can have fun while thinking on their feet,’ she says.

Green says that to land a job at Google, you also need to ‘be prepared to challenge the premise of the question.’

Source: https://www.businessinsider.com.au/favorite-interview-questions-highly-successful-bosses-2017-7#/#tesla-and-spacex-ceo-elon-musk-1

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As a soon-to-be college grad, I know that the world of work can catch you unawares. In preparing for the job search, I’ve found that experienced professionals often have a lot of great advice to dispense (also some not-so-great advice, but that’s an article for another day).

And it’s true that sometimes the wisest tips don’t come from experts, but from real people with real stories. So, with that in mind, The Muse team asked the LinkedIn community what wisdom they’d bestow on recent grads.

And upon reading all the tips, I couldn’t help but think that anyone—and really everyone—should read them, too. So with no further ado, here are my favorites:

1. Remember These Four Words

Be positive, principled, pro-active, and productive.

2. Discover Yourself

Consider this job a journey to learn about yourself. The purpose is to grow as a human being; to discover what you’re good at, what you love to do, and what you dislike.

Discover your why, and you’ll become happier and more passionate in life!

3. Be Open to Change

Don’t get discouraged when a job you really want does not pan out for you. It just opens up doors to other opportunities.

4. Don’t Hide From Mistakes

Be honest. Not sure about something? Ask questions. Screwed up? Own up!

I’ve always valued someone willing to learn, and we do that in different ways. I’ll always highly regard someone willing to be honest about their mistakes because we learn from those just as much as our successes!

5. Keep Moving Forward

Learn to hear feedback and never let it fester. Instead consider it, take what works, and move on.

6. Learn From Everything

Remember every moment is an opportunity to learn from everyone around you, no matter their title.

Pay attention when things go well; pay extra attention when they don’t, and watch how people react to it. Build relationships with the people who face problems by being their solution.

7. Make Connections

Your biggest asset is your network.

8. Be Patient

Networking + Resilience = Success

It won’t be easy but you have to start somewhere. This is just the first step on the stairwell, so don’t give up, and know that the best is yet to come!

9. Utilize Your Co-workers

Don’t be intimidated by your colleagues and superiors!

Remember that they were once in your shoes when they began their careers. Leverage their knowledge and experience and find ways to take what worked for them and adapt it to work for you.

10. Treat Everyone With Respect

Speak when you walk into the office everyday. Say good morning to your boss and peers as you walk past their offices, smile at janitors and receptionists in your office.

Don’t be so focused on getting ahead that it’s all business all the time. Treating people with humanity and integrity is most important.

11. Keep Your Own Counsel

Don’t assume that a co-worker won’t repeat your criticisms of a colleague. When asked how you feel about individuals in the office, be open and vague with your answers.

Always reserve judgment on your co-workers until you have enough time to make up your own mind.

12. Prepare for the Future

Develop good time management habits early on. Your workload will only increase with time, and so will your responsibilities. Be ready when they do.

From making the right impression to getting a handle on time management, a new work environment can be tricky to navigate. And, that goes for anyone, no matter how high up the ladder you are.
Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/12-pieces-of-advice-for-new-grads-that-everyone-should-take
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THE security company that was at the forefront of cleaning up Newcastle’s violent reputation has merged with another city firm and ramped up its training component in a move it says gives city businesses a first-of-its-kind security offering.

Holistic Security, led by Ben Dewson and Charles Hall and specialising in providing security staff to leading city clubs, has merged with Balance Security Solutions, which focuses on security technology, alarms and patrols.

The new company Holistic Industries’ third arm is a registered training organisation started two years ago by Mr Dewson and Mr Hall which runs accredited training programs for those looking to enter the security or hospitality industries.

Mr Hall said the training aspect of the new company would allow it to mould the next generation of staff entering the security field.

“What we bring to the table is passion for our industry and it gives us the change to train people right from the start, by experts in our sector, and we can mould them straight away on correct practices,” he said.

Mr Dewson and Mr Hall were key industry spokesmen in 2008 when the NSW Government introduced the Newcastle Solution, essentially lock-out laws to reduce alcohol-related violence at night spots.

They say by 2011 it was clear the Solution had not had the desired effect, leading them to work with pub owners including Russell Richardson to form the Newcastle Entertainment Precinct, which introduced scanning technology to ban repeat offenders.

Holisitic’s behavioural-based security method  – which relies heavily on educating both patrons and guards and changing behavioural patterns – have been credited by the likes of Mr Richardson for helping curb club violence.

“There’s been a change in security where venues no longer want some big, dumb bouncer looking intimidating,” says Mr Hall.

“It’s not about just having a product, you need customer service and people want to have a good experience at a venue, so when it comes down to security, it needs to complement the business.”

Source: http://www.theherald.com.au/story/4758167/a-holistic-experience/

online-job-search

Over the last month and a bit, I’ve been recruiting. In February, RN advertised for six digital producers. Two of them were on my team, and I received more than 260 applications.

“Digital producer” could mean a lot of things, but for us it meant journalists with multimedia skills — and virtually everyone who applied was between 18 and 30.

In the private sector you can grab the top half of your résumé pile and throw it in the bin on the basis that you don’t want to hire unlucky people, but at the ABC we’re required to pay careful attention to every applicant.

It took a long time, but it was worth it in the end, and gave me a real insight into the job market, the media and how young people present themselves.

Here are some observations that might help other recruiters, and some tips that might help you if you’re a Gen Y looking for a job.

There are no entry-level jobs anymore

Being a millennial sucks. (Please let the record show that I am also a millennial.)

Where professionals in our parents’ generation could finish university armed with nothing but an arts degree and walk into a job that would train them, “entry level” jobs now require years of experience.

Virtually every applicant I saw had developed their skills in multiple volunteer or unpaid roles, and while the jobs we advertised were probably best suited to people with a few years’ experience, this state of affairs is still visible in people’s employment history years down the line.

It’s an arms race: when an entire cohort gets experience this way, those who don’t will slip to the bottom of the pile.

Of course, this is totally unfair: not all young people can afford to work for free, so organisations fill up with more of the same rich, white people who can.

The problem seems particularly acute in the media, where cadetships and other opportunities for on-the-job training are dwindling along with the total number of positions.

Recruiters can hope to correct for this in interviews and the way they consider candidates — and we tried to do this — but it’s a structural problem that needs a structural solution.

One suggestion is to hire based on aptitude tests, rather than CVs or university results. Some companies are already doing this.

The headshot is back in vogue

Lots of applicants included a headshot with their resume. Maybe this is normal in TV or acting, but it seems strange for a digital role.

We get it, you’re hot. That’s not why we hire people.

There’s a point at which a CV becomes overdesigned

Thanks to online tools like Canva, it’s never been easier to dabble in graphic design.

A sizeable proportion of the résumés we saw had more formatting than humble old MS Word can provide. Bright colours, glyphs, textures and shapes abounded.

If you’re applying for a job, there’s no doubt that a well-arranged CV can make you stand out, but a loud or overdesigned one will make you stand out for all the wrong reasons.

How far is too far? A bright pink cover page may be too far. A patterned six-page presentation alternating between portrait and landscape orientation is probably too far. A pie chart of how you spend each day (you only sleep for three and a half hours?) is definitely too far.

Five stars, Margaret

Design inflation plays a role in another weird trend I picked up: heaps of the CVs I saw had a “skills” column, with the candidate’s abilities rated on a five or 10 star scale … by the candidate.

And we’re not just talking about proficiency in, say, editing software; people rate themselves for more nebulous concepts like “time management” and “intercultural communication”.

Of course, these self-assessments tend to be glowing: nobody gives themselves one star.

I get why you’d do this if you were applying for a job: it’s much more visually striking than a list of your skills. But it also makes it obvious when you’re taking creative licence in describing your abilities.

It’s unlikely that you’re a five-star audio producer, a five-star video editor and a five-star reporter. Are there even enough hours in a millennial’s lifetime to learn those skills to such a high level?

It’s much better to be upfront about where your true strengths lie, and at least you’ll get five stars for honesty.

Nobody knows how to write a good cover letter

When I’m looking at applications, I look at the cover letter first. I want the candidate to introduce themselves and explain why they’d be good for the job.

But 90 per cent of the cover letters I saw were just CVs in prose form.

This was:

  1. Boring for me.
  2. Pointless for the applicants; their CVs were also attached.
  3. A bit disturbing; I thought my applicants were professional communicators.

When you’re job hunting, you need to write an original cover letter for every job you apply for — changing the subject line ain’t going to cut it. A cover letter is your opportunity to stand out, so here’s a simple guide to writing a good one.

Introduce yourself. Outline your understanding of the role and the organisation. Make a pitch for your vision of the role and why you would be great at it — this should reference your experience, but it shouldn’t be a laundry list.

Show some personality. Avoid typos. And for God’s sake, keep it to a page.

Millennials are so impressive

Constant technological disruption means it’s a tough time to be in the early stages of your career, but so many young people responded with incredible flexibility and a willingness to learn new skills.

I might have just spent 800 words whinging, but at the end of the day we had so many great people apply for our jobs that it was difficult to choose a shortlist, let alone successful candidates.

As an employer, that’s a great problem to have. As a millennial, not so much.

Source: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-04-10/i-looked-at-100s-of-millenials-cvs-and-this-is-what-i-learned/8430048

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PLANNING and hosting parties has always been Andrea Ciotti’s favourite thing to do.

But when Ms Ciotti moved from her native Florida to the Hunter a couple of years ago to be with her partner Ben Johnston, she battled to find the high-quality and quirky items she could source in the US. So every time she visited her homeland, she’d lug items back to Newcastle.

The conundrum came about the same time that Ciotti, 28, who has a background in events, questioned herself about what brought her most happiness in life.

“I realised it was making people smile and I had a lot of creativity and a desire to bring that all together,” she says.

In February Ms Ciotti did just that when she opened Palm & Pine, a boutique party supply store across from The Edwards in Parry Street, Newcastle West.

The store stocks a swathe of chic cups, plates, napkins and inflatable toys and even has a Balloon Bar that has all manner of coloured ballons, fun balloons in the shape of a beer mug, diamond ring or even the “really popular” poo) and gender reveal balloons for baby showers.

The most popular ones are the confetti balloons – large helium balloons that can be filled with different confetti to suit any private or corporate party theme.

Ms Ciotti, who can help clients set up their party, says her fixation with pineapples came as a child when she and her mum baked a sponge cake that leaked out of its springform tin.

“All that was left on the bottom of the oven was a tiny slither of cake that looked like a pineapple ring, it was the best cake ever,” she says, laughing when she says she began her blog The Pineapple Cake “before pineapples got trendy”.

Thankful for the support of her hubby in store, Ms Ciotti says running her first business has elevated her anxiety – “There is so much to do and it’s difficult finding a balance to not spend all my time in the shop” – but brought great satisfaction.

“It’s getting busier each week and the feedback is incredible, I’ve had repeat customers and people come in and say ‘I saw what you did at my friend’s party and I want this’,” she says.

Source: http://www.theherald.com.au/story/4686502/get-this-party-started/?cs=4200

hunter

Hunter tourism operators are set to receive a boost in education.

The state government has announced it will increase the number of free webcasts available to support the growing need for online learning in the rural and regional tourism sector.

Parliamentary Secretary for the Hunter Scot MacDonald said the number of webcasts available in the Hunter would triple, as part of the program by Destination NSW.

The program, which includes 18 online training events, aims to help tourism businesses develop, promote and sell their products ore effectively.

“This expanded program of online webcasts and webinars allows Hunter tourism operators to log in, learn, and ask questions of tourism experts, from a location that suits them,” Mr MacDonald said.

“In 2016 Destination NSW found 73 per cent of all webinar attendees were from rural and regional NSW.

“The focus of this year’s program is to create more online and on-demand content, which is user-friendly, convenient, accessible and free-of-charge.

“If, for some reason, tourism operators can’t log in for the live webcast, they can always log in later to view the presentation at a time that suits them.”

Tourism and Major Events Minister Adam Marshall said the workshops had a “how-to” focus.

“As a result of last year’s NSW First program and the advice and support of experts from the state’s tourism agency, we are now seeing 37 new tourism products being offered in international markets, and more than half of those new tourism products come from rural and regional NSW,” he said.

Source: maitlandmercury.com.au

Leonardo da Vinci. Marie Curie. Thomas Edison. Beatrix Potter.

What did all four of these people have in common?

Not only were they all highly motivated and creative individuals, but they also all kept some form of an idea journal.

An idea journal is not a diary where you have to record all of the details of your day. Rather, it’s a place where you jot down daily goals, achievements, observations, ideas for projects, quotes, or other bits of inspiration.

If you’re working on a project, you can fill your journal with updates on your progress, thoughts on how to improve the project, and anything else that motivates you. A writer’s might be filled with ideas for stories or articles or blog posts. An artist’s might contain sketches or inspirations for drawings. Ultimately, the idea journal exists as a private place to plant your thoughts and watch them grow.

Here are four reasons why some of the most successful people keep one (and you should, too):

1. It Helps You Remember and Develop Ideas

Leonardo da Vinci may not have kept an idea journal strictly speaking, but he did fill hundreds of pages with sketches, scientific diagrams, ideas for new inventions, and reflections on art. These pages were bound together as books after his death.

To make his writings even more private, da Vinci often employed a kind of shorthand and didn’t worry about perfect penmanship or proper punctuation.

What he did care about was carefully recording his lab notes and his many ideas for new inventions—everything from a flying machine to a submarine prototype.

Whether you’re researching an article or a novel or planning any kind of project, you need a place where you can organize all of that material. Like da Vinci’s notebooks, an idea journal helps you clarify your thoughts and express them more clearly. The action of writing down an idea forces you to think more deeply about it.

2. It Helps You Evaluate Lessons Learned

Marie Curie was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize and the only person to win in multiple sciences. She also kept detailed lab notebooks that described her discovery of two elements: radium and polonium. These notes gave her a permanent and immediate record of her experiments and accomplishments.

Though you may not be a scientist, an idea journal acts as a lab notebook of sorts. While working on a project, you can use it to record each step of your journey: the difficulties that set you back, the hurdles you overcome, the milestones you make, and your final achievements.

The idea journal helps you avoid repeating mistakes in the future. And, you can flip through it to see all the steps you took toward completing your goals.

3. It Motivates You

Here is a photo of a page from one of Thomas Edison’s notebooks. He writes at the top of the page things doing and to be done. His to-do list runs for several pages and includes an amazing number of ideas, including an electrical piano, “unflammable” insulating material, ink for the blind, and an apparatus to help the deaf.

Edison’s to-do list shows how we can use an idea journal to warm up our creative muscle. Your lists can reveal to you a detailed picture of the things you’re passionate about and can even show you what field of study you should pursue.

Best of all, it motivates you to fight procrastination, list your goals, and start working to accomplish them. It reminds you to not abandon your dreams, but continue to strive to achieve them.

4. It Makes You a Better Observer

Beatrix Potter is most famous for her children’s stories about Peter Rabbit and her beautiful watercolor illustrations. However, she was also keenly interested in the natural sciences, especially botany.

From the age of 15, Beatrix Potter kept a journal in a secret code she had invented. The code was not cracked until 15 years after her death. Potter’s journals are filled with accounts of the long walks she took and her observations of the natural world. It was in this journal that she began to outline her scientific theories. She also recorded her opinions on society, fashion, art, and current events.

Potter practiced her observational skills by writing in her journal. Your notebook will train you to be observant as well. Writing encourages you to be curious, ask questions about the world, think innovatively, and find creative solutions to the problems you encounter.

 

Ready to start your idea journal?

Ultimately, there are no rules set in stone when it comes to making yours. It’s up to you to decide what to fill it with—just remember that its purpose is to inspire you.

An idea journal doesn’t have to be a physical notebook, although writingwith a pen and paper will give you the feeling of creating something and make your ideas that much more real.

Personally, I have several idea journals. For example, I love using Evernote to store the many articles and quotes I collect when I’m researching writing projects. Evernote has a feature that allows you to save anything you see online—including text, links, and images—into your account with a single click.

Additionally, I journal almost every day using an app called Day One that has a simple and elegant interface.

Ultimately, the idea journal is a portable laboratory where we can record our own unique perspective on the world, note the things in our lives that awaken our muse, and experiment with new ideas.

Source: http://inkwellscholars.org/4-reasons-to-keep-an-idea-journal/

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Omitting your graduation date isn’t “sketchy,” in fact, it’s a very effective technique for older job seekers. There are plenty of tips and tricks out there, but here are three techniques that’ll propel you past the age-specific concerns that are getting in your way.

1. Get Ahead of Objections

Before you head into an interview (regardless of your age) you should ask yourself what in your background might be of concern to the hiring manager. Sometimes frequent relocation or short stints of employment raise eyebrows. For the older job seeker, they might be how your professional experience lines up with the role you’re after and what kind of salary you require.

For example, if you’re interviewing for a more mid-level role that won’t have you managing anyone, a younger hiring manager may wonder why you aren’t after a lead or management position. They may also presume that they can’t afford you based on your years of experience.

You can get ahead of their worries in how you answer the “tell me about yourself” question. Providing examples that proactively address a hiring manager’s age-based concerns is the way to eliminate them. Talking about your desire to remain hands-on can explain your lack of interest in a management position.

2. Align With the Culture

This is possibly the most important thing that you can do. Having a thorough understanding of a company’s core values, and being able to demonstrate your alignment with them is crucial to overcoming the unspoken concern that the rest of the team might be younger than you.

Pay special attention to the office culture, and if possible, try to land an informational interview with someone from the company. Nothing quite compares to having an internal champion singing your praises before you even apply to the job.

3. Do Not (Directly) Comment on Your Age

If you’re interviewing with a person several years younger than you, keeping the focus on your relevant skills is key. Avoid statements that shift the focus to your age. Saying things like “Oh, I’m probably aging myself” in reference to an industry tool or obsolete brand or “I’ve worked with this system—but not since 2004” isn’t helpful. Instead, refer to your experience by employer, not by year.

Try, “I had a chance to use this system with JP Morgan,” or “I’ve been playing with the most recent release”—both better options than unnecessarily dating yourself.

At the end of the day, a company that won’t even look your way because of your age is not a place you want to be. When experience is viewed as a liability instead of a benefit, it’s not a job you will love or a place you will succeed. Finding companies and roles that value employees for their skill sets is key to finding professional happiness.

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/ask-a-career-coach-how-do-i-get-around-ageism-in-the-job-search?ref=recently-published-2

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THE new year has brought a smattering of new childcare businesses in Newcastle, with most citing demand for a growing shortage of vacancies in the region as their motivator.

Warners Bay centre Little Beginnings has opened its second, 92-place facility in Hillsborough Road and newcomer Creative Childcare has opened in Kotara with plans to open at least five centres in Newcastle and surrounds this year. In Waratah, purpose-built The Hub is run by veteran educators Raylee Davies and Nicole Denzin, who opened their first The Hub centre in Mayfield a year ago.

The pair met while teaching at Belmont Christian College and job-shared the role of director of Mayfield Community Preschool.

A restructure of government funding two years ago that potentially threatened the pre-school’s numbers led she and Mrs Denzin to start The Hub, which offers long day care hours and a focus on “holistic” quality care.

It opened on January 9 and is taking new enrolments.

“Council is saying there is demand, well we are not full and I am concerned but I feel happy because we are at 50 per cent capacity and we have only been open three days,” says Mrs Denzin.

A council spokesperson said council had received 24 development applications with a reference to child care in the past year. Of those, 15 have been approved, with one refused and nine still to be determined.

The Hub aspires for childcare that goes beyond best practice and its “heart and vision”, says Mrs Davies, is “that we become an extension of home for our families and children”.  It has seven rooms and “free flow” design, with indoor rooms all connected to the outdoors to maximise interaction between the two spaces in a natural setting.

Creative Childcare co-founder Craig Neil said the business will add as many as 400 places in planned centres in Newcastle, Warabrook and Hamilton this year.

“We want to raise the bar in the provision of childcare in the area,” he said.

The centre incorporates creative learning principles including music, art, dance and food into its curriculum.

Source: http://www.theherald.com.au/story/4411301/growth-spurt-in-care/?cs=4200

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Aldi is on schedule to open its third Maitland supermarket in September.

The company will open in The Hunter Mall on The Levee in September.

Fairfax Media announced plans for the supermarket earlier this month after a liquour licence application revealed Aldi’s plans to move into The Hunter Mall and not into a property it owns in Elgin Street, the site of the former Sam’s Warehouse.

The application had been publicly displayed between Kmart and Best and Less, where the store will ultimately open its doors.

A spokesperson for The Hunter Mall owners said the move is not only great news for businesses in the mall but for The Levee as a whole.

“The company is working towards a September opening but there is still a lot of tenancy works that have to be carried out between now and then,” the spokesperson said.

“There are a couple of development applications that still have to go before council and then the store will have to be fitted out.”

The spokesperson said the inclusion of Aldi in The Hunter Mall has the potential to increase revenue in the centre by about 30 per cent.

“Everyone is very positive about the news and it goes to show the confidence big companies do have in Maitland.

“This was a much sought after site with a few businesses vying for the tenancy,” the spokesperson said.

Asked what Aldi’s plans were for the former Sam’s site, the spokesperson said to “watch this space.”

Aldi announced on January 4 it was pleased to confirm the company had reached an agreement with the owners of The Hunter Mall to take up a tenancy opportunity in the centre in mid 2017.

The news was applauded by long time Maitland businessman Patrick Lane of Ken Lane Menswear.

“This will be great for the CBD, fantastic and will further consolidate our position as a relevant centre.

“Aldi will bring more people back into the heart of the city,” Mr Lane said.

The Hunter Mall spokesperson said the delivery of an Aldi in the centre further “secures and anchors” the centre’s position as a new and vibrant shopping location.

“In an environment of uncertainty people will now see us as a place to come for a first class shopping experience.

“We’re expecting to draw customers from the wider Hunter Valley and Cessnock,” the spokesperson said.

“It’s a full house now.”

Source: http://www.maitlandmercury.com.au/story/4424118/third-aldi-city-revenue-booster/

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The announcement that cinema giant Hoyts has signed on to run the new movie complex as part of Stockland’s major revamp of its Green Hills shopping centre is another sign that there’s growing confidence in business in the Lower Hunter.

Stockland confirmed on Tuesday that Hoyts would run the seven-screen movie theatre in the new-look shopping hub in Maitland’s east, which is expected to be complete in mid 2018.

Fairfax Media reported previously that the $412 million redevelopment will feature a David Jones department store, JB HiFi, Target, Big W, dozens of specialty stores and a revamped dining and entertainment area.

When work on the upgrades began last February, centre manager Chris Travers told Fairfax Media that Stockland wanted to continue the momentum in Green Hills, which was one of the company’s busiest shopping centres, had built.

While the arrival of Hoyts will represent competition for some businesses – just as the revamped Green Hills shopping precinct will present an alternative to other shopping destinations in the Maitland area – ultimately such an investment is a clear indication of confidence in this region’s economy.

The redevelopment has been estimated to generate more than 2285 jobs – some of those during construction and others in the resulting shopping centre.

Given this region’s recent history with high unemployment, as well as repeated questions about the future of mining and the flow-on effects this could have on business, this confidence is just what the doctor ordered.

And you don’t have to extend your gaze far to see similar confidence blossoming throughout the Maitland area.

Foot traffic in The Levee appears to have grown significantly – with work on the long awaited Riverlink Building taking place, anticipation of the arrival of a new-look city centre is peaking.

There appear to be far fewer empty shopfronts in High Street compared with the situation a couple of years ago, and the recent confirmation that international supermarket behemoth Aldi plans to set up shop in Hunter Mall, near Kmart, also show that business and economic momentum in this region is building.

For an area that is experiencing rapid population growth, that’s a comforting thing. These are all good signs for the Lower Hunter’s economy.

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While the hospitality and retail industry are experiencing their busiest period of the year, for some it is a chance to consolidate plans for the year ahead.

The Hunter Business Chamber is a significant voice in this region, as we advocate across many issues for small and large businesses. It is exciting to see urban renewal forging ahead in the city, but equally we continue to experience growth across the entire region. Appropriate infrastructure is important to support this growth and skilled labour is an essential part of this.

While the Hunter has experienced a steady climb in the number of apprentices starting this year, it is not true across the rest of the state. Generally speaking, apprenticeship rates are in decline and the system is in need of reform. This is outlined in the NSW Business Chamber’s “Thinking Business” report, Laying the Foundations for Apprenticeship Reform.

While some increase in apprentices has been seen, employers report a lack of job readiness and adaptability on the part of workers starting out in their trade. Findings in the June 2016 quarter National Centre for Vocational Education Research report show employers are increasingly turning to other sources of labour.

One of the issues is a misguided perception by young people, parents and, often, careers advisors, that an apprenticeship isn’t a desirable career pathway. This is interesting when figures show 85.5 per cent of apprentices have full-time jobs six months after completing their training, compared to only 68 per cent of recent university graduates. Conversations with our young people need to acknowledge there are many pathways a career can take. Skilled trades are crucial to our economy and will continue to offer great prospects across a wide range of industries.

The NSW Business Chamber proposes a new apprenticeship model involving a year of general industry training before moving to a specialisation, much like the model for undergraduate degrees. Other recommendations include improved vocational training by schools, a national industry led careers advice service, targeted incentive payments and job ready initiatives.

Changing the face of apprenticeship systems and working more closely with stakeholders will improve participation and retention rates and provide greater involvement by industry, delivering a valuable job ready workforce for the future.

Source: http://www.theherald.com.au/story/4379321/skilled-labour-vital-for-future/

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In case you just woke up from a very long nap and missed it, 2017 is officially here! Everyone you know is making New Year’s resolutions to work out more often, eat less fried foods, and find a job that pays them one billion dollars a year to do the exact thing they want to do.

You probably roll your eyes every time you read a status along these lines, and when you do, I have a feeling it makes you think that making these resolutions is an exercise in futility. I’m as much of a skeptic as the next person, but there are a few things I know you can achieve by the end of the year.

1. You Can Stop Thinking About Networking and Just Do It

How many times have you bumped into someone you knew and said, “Hey, this was great. Let’s set up some more time to talk about what I want to do with the rest of my life,” only to see three months go by before you even think about following up?

I’m not here to give you a hard time for ghosting anyone you intended to connect with. But at the same time, this is an ideal time to be more intentional about staying in touch with your network.

If you meet with someone and feel the urge to say that you’ll reach out to set up some time, stop yourself and just schedule the meeting in that moment. If you can’t commit to doing this, don’t feel guilty about not throwing out the “Let’s catch up” line to close a conversation.

Nobody will hold it against you for not offering to meet whenever you run into each other, I promise.

2. You Can Look For New Career Development Opportunities

I get it—sometimes it feels like there are so many options out there to “boost your career” that it’s impossible to narrow them down and make any progress. But, as daunting as it might seem, the truth is that simply looking at your options is a great way to kick-start some serious career growth.

You can sit down and create a list of all the options out there—courses, books, career coaches. And you can just pick one and follow through.

Whether that requires you to create calendar events for yourself (with annoying reminders) to keep at it, leave Post-it notes around your place, or have a friend text you every week checking in—get started by surrounding yourself with as much encouragement as you need to make this one thing happen.

Sure, you might find hundreds of classes and thousands of books that aren’t relevant to what you want to accomplish this year. But when you find the one thing that inspires you to dig a little deeper, you’ll be amazed by how motivated you’ll be to keep going.

3. You Can Take a Hard Look at How You Feel About Your Current Job

You might like your job right now. In fact, if you’re lucky, you might really like it. But there will come a time when you like it a little bit less, and a little bit less, and a little bit less—until one day you wake up and want to quit.

Avoid that feeling of “How the heck did I get here?” by setting regular checkpoints for yourself throughout the year (and creating actual events on your calendar that’ll pop and and remind you).

On each of these days, ask yourself the following questions

  1. Was I happy to come into the office this week?
  2. Have I done anything recently that I’m proud of?
  3. Does my current path still fit my long-term goals?

As long as you can keep answering yes, keep on cruising. But the first time you have to pause and think for a second, it’s time to have a heart-to-heart with yourself on what you want your next step to be (whether that’s addressing a problem or starting to make small moves).

If you want to set some lofty goals for your career this year, I’m not going to stop you. But there’s nothing wrong with going easy on yourself and setting a few achievable resolutions.

Remember: If you run into any roadblocks along the way, try not to let it get you too down for too long. The beauty of these options is that they’re ongoing and it’s hard to fall behind.

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/3-things-i-know-you-can-accomplish-this-year?ref=carousel-slide-1

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If you feel there is just not enough time in the day, this article will make you think about your schedule and work/life balance differently.  How will this impact your productivity?

Too many of us fall into the ’24-hour trap,’ and it guarantees we’ll never get anything done

By: Shana Lebowitz, Business Insider

Laura Vanderkam calls it the “24-hour trap.”

It’s this idea that work/life balance has to happen every day — that every 24 hours has to be neatly divided between your professional responsibilities and everything else you care about. And it’s a “trap” because it’s virtually impossible for so many people to achieve, especially parents who hold jobs outside the home.

A better option, Vanderkam says, is to think in terms of 168 hours, or full weeks. Even if you can’t fit in a full eight hours of work, two meals with your kids, and a date with your partner every single day, you can probably make time for everyone over the course of seven days.

Vanderkam is the author of multiple books on productivity and time-management, including, most recently, “I Know How She Does It.” In the book, she writes that most people think of the week as Monday through midday Thursday. If they can’t fit all their personal and professional priorities into that time period, they’re either a terrible employee, or a terrible parent, or a dysfunctional human being.

Vanderkam urges readers to embrace Friday through Sunday as usable time, too. For one thing, you might want to do some work on the weekends, so that you can leave the office at a reasonable hour during the week. Or, it could simply mean seeing the hours you spend with your kids on Saturdays and Sundays as an investment in your family, instead of discounting them.

“Any given 24 hours might not be balanced, but the 168-hour week can be,” Vanderkam writes.

For the book, Vanderkam had dozens of high-earning women keep time logs, and analysed them for trends and surprises. Some women whose logs she analysed deliberately worked long days part of the week, and shorter days the rest of the week, so that they could be with their families.

Perhaps the most important takeaway is that you can still be a good parent, or a good member of an organisation, even if your days don’t look “balanced” in the traditional sense. So don’t necessarily assume you can’t pursue a career in consulting, for example, because it requires some travel and you have kids at home.

With a little creativity, you can probably make it happen.

Source: http://www.versatileresourcing.com/getting-things-done/

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If you’re searching for your ideal job, consider this quote:

“Somewhere someone is looking for exactly what you have to offer.”  (Louise Hay)

So, spruce up your Resume, showcase your skills and connect to some great local opportunities in our weekly jobs update, right here!

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The mortal impact of micro-management

The impact of management styles on the health and well-being of workers has been examined, with micro-management being shown to have a hugely negative effect.  But by adapting styles and allowing employees to contribute to setting their own goals, both their health, and the success of the business, benefit.

Micro-managing is a good way to send your staff to early graves

Work stress can cut your life short, according to the latest research.

The burden tends to push people towards an unhealthy lifestyle, eating poorly and exercising less.

But science has found a clear way to make work life more enjoyable and productive.

The research shows that the impact of stress on health depends on the level of control you have over your own work at the office.

So those who like to micromanage might get the results they want but their style causes a lot of stress and subsequent health problems in their direct reports.

And inspirational office leaders, the ones with clear visions who spur their staff on and on to bigger and bigger goals, also create enough stress to make some sick, according to earlier research.

But the stress disappears if you give staff greater flexibility to set their own goals, the latest research shows. They work no less harder. They just end the day happier.

Those in high stress jobs with little control over their workflow are less healthy and tend to die younger, according to research from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business. They are 15.4% more likely to die young.

But give those people more control and there’s a 34% fall in the likelihood of death, even compared to people in less demanding jobs.

“We explored job demands, or the amount of work, time pressure and concentration demands of a job, and job control, or the amount of discretion one has over making decisions at work, as joint predictors of death,” says Erik Gonzalez-Mulé, assistant professor of organisational behavior.

“These findings suggest that stressful jobs have clear negative consequences for employee health when paired with low freedom in decision-making, while stressful jobs can actually be beneficial to employee health if also paired with freedom in decision-making.”

The researchers believe their study is the first to examine the relationship between job characteristics and mortality.

The results don’t suggest employers need to cut back on what is expected from employees. Rather, they demonstrate the value in giving workers with more say about how the work they need to do gets done.

“You can avoid the negative health consequences if you allow them to set their own goals, set their own schedules, prioritise their decision-making and the like,” says Gonzalez-Mulé.

Employees should be given a voice in goal-setting, making it a two-way conversation.

“When you don’t have the necessary resources to deal with a demanding job, you do this other stuff,” says Gonzalez-Mulé. “You might eat more, you might smoke, you might engage in some of these things to cope with it.”

About a quarter (26%) of deaths were in people in frontline service jobs. A third (32%) were those with manufacturing jobs who also reported high job demands and low control.

“What we found is that those people that are in entry-level service jobs and construction jobs have pretty high death rates, more so than people in professional jobs and office positions,” he says. “Interestingly, we found a really low rate of death among agricultural workers.”

Gonzalez-Mulé said the new study highlights the benefits of job crafting, a process that enables employees to mold and redesign their job to make it more meaningful.

Other research suggests that workers who engage in job crafting are happier and are more productive than co-workers who don’t.

The research, Worked to Death: The Relationships of Job Demands and Job Control With Mortality, is published in the journal Personnel Psychology.

The study used data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study which followed more than 10,000 people who graduated from Wisconsin high schools in 1957. They were interviewed at various times over their lives to 2011.

Source: http://www.versatileresourcing.com/mortal-impact-micro-managing/ from

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com.au/micro-managing-is-a-good-way-to-send-your-staff-to-early-graves-2016-10