Posts Tagged “hunter valley”

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HUNTER businesswoman Kirsten Molloy has led a trio of women working in regional mines to win industry recognition.

Ms Molloy, the chief executive officer of the Hunter Valley Coal Chain Coordinator, took out the Exceptional Woman in Mining award at the recent Industry and Suppliers Awards dinner at NSW Parliament.

Chloe Piggford, the environment and community manager at Glencore Integra underground mine near Singleton, was named the Exceptional Young Woman in NSW Mining.

Jemma Callaghan, a mobile equipment operator/trainer assessor at Rio Tinto Coal & Allied’s Mt Thorley Warkworth Mine, was named Outstanding NSW Tradeswoman/Operator/Technician.

Source: http://www.theherald.com.au/story/4591155/molloy-leads-industry-awards/?cs=4200

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THE Australia Institute has released economic modelling that shows a moratorium on new mines or mine expansions would have a minimal impact on the national economy.

The self-described “progressive” institute says the research shows Australia could easily handle a gradual phasing out of coal. It says gross domestic product and employment would still grow strongly because coal is a relatively small part of the national economy.

Institute research director Rod Campbell said the Hunter would be the region of Australia “most affected by a phase-out of coal mining” but the economic modelling carried out by Victoria University showed the region’s economy would continue to grow even if mines were shutting down.

“Even with a moratorium, the Hunter economy is estimated to grow from a gross regional output of $37 billion dollars in 2016 to over $50 billion dollars in 2040,” Dr Campbell said.

“The continued growth of the Hunter under a policy of no new coal mines is a result of the region’s diverse economy. While the region produces most of NSW’s coal, it also includes the major city of Newcastle and a range of industries. Coal mining accounts for only five percent of employment.”

Dr Campbell said most of the benefit to the Hunter from mining came from wages: the profits went elsewhere, often overseas.

He said the modelling did not capture the impact that coal mining had on the environment and on mining-affected communities. If these costs were included, the benefits would be even greater than the research suggested.

The NSW Minerals Council takes issue with much of the Australia Institute’s work, and says mining companies spend at least $7 billion a year in NSW.

Source: http://www.theherald.com.au/story/4172277/study-looks-at-hunter-economy-after-coal/?cs=305

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There’s so much to do in the Hunter Region this weekend it’s ridiculous!  We’ve got the Hunter Valley Moon Festival, Smokin’ and Blues Festival,  Spring Festival of Flowers and the Hunter Wine Country Markets – just to name a few!

What if you are looking for work or someone new to join your team and still ant to join in the fun?  No probs – just go wireless and find what you need right there relaxing on your picnic blanket enjoying the view.  The beauty of Jobs In The Hunter is that you can check in and apply, join or search any time anywhere.  So click here to see your Weekly Update  and find what’s waiting for you…

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Do you have favorite interview questions that you ask each job applicant at an interview? If so, you’re not alone. Seasoned interviewers develop a short list of best questions that quickly tell them what they need to know about a candidate’s job skills, job fit, and potential cultural fit. I have my best interview questions, too.

My best interview questions focus on the skills I want candidates to have and the contributions that I most want my candidate to make.

They help me assess the prospective employee’s work experience and his or her approach to problem solving. They help me understand how the candidate interacts with people and the work environment.

These best interview questions have a track record of helping me select people who became successful employees. These are some of my best interview questions to ask a prospective employee and your goal in asking each question.

BEST INTERVIEW QUESTIONS

Interview Question: Tell me about your greatest achievement at work.

Goal: The applicant’s answer tells a lot about what the individual values and what he or she considers important. It also demonstrates what the applicant considers to be an achievement.

Interview Question: Describe the work environment in which you will most effectively be able to contribute.

Goal: The candidate’s response tells the interviewer whether their work environment is congruent with the candidate’s needs. The answer helps the interviewer

Interview Question: What kind of oversight and interaction would your ideal boss provide?

Goal: You want to know how self-directed your candidate is. In a company that emphasizes empowerment, for example, a candidate that requires constant direction will not fit. If you know that the boss who is the hiring manager is a micromanager, the self-driven candidate may not succeed. (What are you doing about this boss’s management style?)

Interview Question: Tell me about a time when you had to overcome a major obstacle that stood in the way of you accomplishing a goal or commitment.

Goal: You will obtain a clear picture of the candidate’s past performance. You obtain information about his or her problem solving style and you also learn about what the candidate considers an obstacle. You may also learn about his or her interaction style with coworkers.

Interview Question: What prompted you to apply for this job? What interested you the most about this position?

Goal: You want to know what the prospective employee is most interested in related to your position. The answer will tell you about what motivates the individual and what is important to the applicant.

Interview Question: Why are you leaving your current employer? (If the applicant is employed.)

Goal: The applicant’s response tells you about his or her values, outlook, goals, and needs from an employer. You can determine what prompted the job search.

Interview Question: What are the three most important attributes or skills that you believe you would bring to our company if we hired you?

Goal: The candidate’s answer tells you what he or she considers most important in their skill set. You also learn about how the candidate views your open position.

Interview Question: What are the first three things you would do on the job if you were hired for this position?

Goal: You will gain an understanding of what the applicant deems important, their understanding of the requirements of your job, and how the candidate approaches a new situation.

Interview Question: How would your coworkers at your current job describe your interaction with them and your general effectiveness in your work performance? How would your coworkers describe you?

Goal: You want to understand how the candidate thinks that his or her coworkers view their interaction. You also want to assess how coworkers like working with the candidate. These questions give you an idea about the candidate’s assessment of his effectiveness in his current job and in his relationship with coworkers. Past practice can predict future results.

Interview Question: How would your current boss describe your work and contribution?

Goal: You want to understand how the candidate perceives the support and opinion of his current employer. This question tells you about the candidate’s interaction with his current boss. It also informs you about how he accepts criticism and feedback.

Interview Question: How do you believe that your current skills will contribute to the accomplishment of our company’s goals and mission as stated on our website or in company literature?

Goal: Prospective employees have long been asked to learn about the company to which they are applying. In this Internet age, learning about the company has never been easier. This question tells you if the prospective employee did learn about your company. Further, it tells you if the candidate was thoughtful about his or her potential “fit” in your company and whether she will be able to contribute.

Interview Question: How do you go about continuing to develop your professional skills and knowledge?

Goal: You want to hire employees who believe in continuous development and improvement. Listen carefully to whether the prospective employee pursues his or her own professional development or whether they depend on their employer to provide the development opportunities.

These are examples of the best interview questions to ask as you recruit and interview new employees. You will devise your own list of the best interview questions to ask as you participate in more interviews and experience the success or failure of the people that you hire.

By Susan M. Heathfield

https://www.thebalance.com/best-interview-questions-for-employers-to-ask-applicants-1918483

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Are you looking for a new position?
Click here and use your intuition.

You may have the need to increase staff?
Well click here now, it’s not a craft.

Looking for some industry tips?
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We have got it all for you…
At JOBS IN THE HUNTER- we share it too!

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The full moon last night was spectacular and with it, brings new beginnings.

Confucius say…“If you shoot for the stars and hit the moon, it’s OK. But you’ve got to shoot for something. A lot of people don’t even shoot.”  So CLICK HERE to view our Weekly Update from Jobs In The Hunter and move towards YOUR next phase…whether you’re looking for a new job, need some ideas on reducing stress in the workplace or are searching for your ideal employee, we can light the way.

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It’s always pleasant (if rare) to find a management tactic that works well and is also easy and even fun. Over the course of my career – both as an employee and a manager – the best way I found to reduce stress and improve productivity was simple: to exercise at midday.

Everyone has his or her own biorhythms, but I found and observed energy and concentration often flagging toward midday. And also noted considerably renewed energy and productivity following a lunchtime workout.

These aren’t simply my own idiosyncratic observations. Numerous studies link exercise to mood elevation and productivity enhancement, as well as more collaborative and tolerant behavior. The benefits of exercise are copiously well documented; the trick is effectively integrating a regular exercise program into a conservative or restrictive work environment.

What form of exercise works best? My answer’s simple: Whatever you like and can easily do in or near the workplace. For me it was usually a 3-mile run. All I needed was a change of clothes and a shower. Many I managed liked weightlifting, walking, aerobics classes, yoga, Spinning and so on. (Personal aside: The only form of exercise that was clearly not for me was Spinning. First, it looks wicked hard. Second, I exercised at least partly to take a break from people barking at me, so the last thing I wanted while taking a break from people barking at me was other people barking at me.)

Here are six common reasons why people can’t or don’t exercise at work, and ways to easily overcome them.

  1. I don’t have time. Sure you do. It may take you 15 minutes longer than a normal lunch hour (maybe even 30 if you have to go a little farther to get to a facility), so work 15 (or 30) minutes later. Chances are in those extra 15 minutes you’ll be more energized and productive than if you hadn’t exercised in the first place.
  2. My boss won’t let me. Tell him or her… data shows exercise enhances productivity, reduces stress, and improves collaboration. Ask for a chance to demonstrate the results, and be sure to over-deliver when providing them.
  3. We don’t have a Fitness Center. It’s great if your company has one, but no knockout if you don’t. Sometimes all you need is a shower. Or you can go to a nearby gym or club. Often your company can get a corporate discount, a trade that helps both teams.
  4. I won’t have time to eat lunch. Nonsense. Eat lunch at your desk while working following your workout. I did it productively for decades. I ate a cheese sandwich or a peanut butter sandwich (fortunately I have a limitless capacity for monk-like culinary boredom), plus an apple or an orange. The main criterion for my lunch was that it could be prepared literally within one minute – no kidding – at about 9 p.m. the night before.
  5. My hair will be a mess. Don’t be too hard enough on yourself. I’m sure your hair actually looks a lot better than you think it does. Note to employees: Of course you’ll use common sense here – no triathlon workouts right before Board presentations. Note to managers: Offer (as appropriate to your environment) flexibility of casual dress and appearance. Your employees will appreciate you for it and likely reward you with loyalty and diligence.
  6. My CEO doesn’t believe in exercise in the workplace… I’m as old school and dinosaurish as they come and I’ve been exercising at work since the 1970s. Note to CEOs: You’ll gain in employee engagement. You’ll gain in recruiting. You may gain in reduced absenteeism and health care costs (though that’s usually harder to document). Plus, dedicated exercisers/athletes tend to be highly disciplined individuals and fine employees. It’ll make your company a cooler happier place.
  7. One final thought: The ability to exercise at work is a benefit and privilege, so you can’t abuse it – all expected work still has to get done. Otherwise, any straight-thinking manager will – and should – pull the plug quickly. But it shouldn’t come to that. Well-managed exercise programs improve the quality of worklife for employees and management alike. And that’s the bottom line. I’d write more, but I’ve got to go for a run.

Source Victor Lipman

http://www.forbes.com/sites/victorlipman/2012/06/05/one-easy-way-to-reduce-workplace-stress-and-enhance-producitivity/#d10f516194bc

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Yaaa!  It’s the Olympics and aren’t we doing oarsomely?

At Jobs In The Hunter we are running as fast as we can to slam dunk as many jobs, opportunities and information onto our online jobs notice board and pass it on to you.  Click here to see our Weekly Update!  We want to help you land your next employment hurdle with a perfect score for your new job or employee.  So take the leap, dive in (without a splash), go for gold and feel like a weight has been lifted from  your shoulders…it’s all smooth sailing from here!!  Cheering!

homer

The sun has been shining and the warmth in the air brings a spring to your step.  Let the good times keep rolling and let us help you achieve your employment goals by clicking here and checking out our Weekly Update here at Jobs In The Hunter.

If there is one thing Homer Simpson said right it was “All my life I’ve had one dream, to achieve my many goals.”… so set them and go get them!

dog with glasses

Tired of scanning the papers for work?  Sick of searching relentlessly for new staff?  Click here for your weekly update with Jobs In the Hunter and make the first step towards successfully finding what you need!

wild weather2

It may have been a week of crazy wild weather but here at Jobs In The Hunter we have been keeping things on the level, by doing what we do best… finding new jobs and applicants for YOU!  Click here to get your weekly update.

somewhere over the rainbow

Somewhere over the rainbow is the job or employee that YOU WANT!  Get to the place that you’ve heard of by clicking here and see what Jobs In The Hunter have to offer this week.  We have jobs, info and news so make sure you keep updated cause Jobs In The Hunter is where… you’ll… find… it…

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Former BHP steelworkers in Newcastle have reached out to the thousands of Arrium employees facing a nervous future after the company’s collapse.

Arrium went into voluntary administration yesterday.

It is the parent company of OneSteel, which operates several Hunter manufacturing sites, and jobs at seven Hunter-based firms are now under a cloud.

Australian Workers Union (AWU) branch secretary Richard Downie is meeting with Arrium administrator Grant Thornton in Adelaide on Friday to find out the future for local jobs at sites including Mayfield, Cardiff and Hexham.

Mr Downie said it appeared at least one local plant was safe.

“The announcement left Mollycop Mining Consumables, which is the old Commonwealth Steel Plant in Waratah, out of the picture, so they’re safe,” he said.

“As for the rest of Arrium, both in Newcastle and nationally, there’s a big question mark.”

More than 8,000 jobs are at risk nationally, including nearly 3,000 in New South Wales and many of those in Newcastle.

Workers urged to stand tall

Newcastle’s steel sector was in mourning in 1999 when the BHP plant closed at Mayfield.

Ex-steelworker Aubrey Brooks, who represents a large group of former BHP steelworkers, said he understood the uncertainty.

“To lose steelmaking, it is really bad and it is bad for OneSteel here at Mayfield,” he said.

“The people at OneSteel they have been terrific to us; they even helped us build the memorial for the people that died on the main BHP site.

“You can imagine what is going through their minds.”

Mr Brooks said Arrium workers needed to stay positive, despite the devastating news.

“Well that is all you can do; stand tall, stand tall like the steelworkers of Newcastle did,” he said.

“Hold your heads up high and mate, a little prayer wouldn’t hurt either.”

He said it was a dark time for the nation’s steel sector.

“Mate, this is frightening, not only for Newcastle but it is frightening for Australia,” he said.

“I mean, I can’t even understand if the government lets this happen.

“This is really really bad. It is the worst news I’ve heard since 1999.”

By Giselle Wakatama and Penny Evans

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-04-08/former-newcastle-bhp-steelworkers-reach-out-to-arrium-employees/7309642