Posts Tagged “JOB INTERVIEW TIPS”

job interview

So you’ve aced your resume YAY!   Now…the interview.  Instead of feeling doubtful - get prepared!  From what the employer has read about you, they have liked - they have already got an inside scoop from you!  Now it’s your turn to get some information from them – make the interview a two way communication pathway and you will be amazed at the outcomes.  You will feel empowered and they will be impressed that you had the confidence to dig deeper than most people do.  Read on for some tips on which questions you should ask at your next job interview.  

There are standard questions to ask during a job interview, and then you’ve got the ones you really should avoid.

It’s obviously important to ask your potential future employer the basics, but don’t bore them with the same old lines without throwing in a few things they actually really want to be asked.

Here are some ideas for shaking up the interview and keeping both you and your interviewer on your toes. These will help you stand out and get remembered the next time you’re job searching.

1. What’s the one quality you hope for your employees to have?

This simple question begs a concise, definitive answer from your interviewer. It also is a great way to really get a feel for what the company you’re interviewing with is looking for — and to see if it’s the right fit for you.

For instance, if you’re a people person and love working with a team, and the “one thing” your interviewer is looking for is someone who is self-directed and can work well alone, then that may already mean the position isn’t what you’re looking for.

2. How does the company define and measure success?

Future employers like it when you know your professional goals and are impressed when you can be assertive about personal and team success within the company.

By asking for more information about how the company measures success and recognizes accomplishments, you’re subtly saying that you already plan on being a model of success in your role.

3. What is the company culture like?

Company culture is crucial. It can make or break a job for many people, so getting a feel for what the people are like at your potential place of work is must-know information. Interviewers will see that you understand the importance of office relationships and company culture by asking this question in your interview in anticipation of being hired.

It’s also an indicator that getting along with co-workers is important to you, and this implies that you’re a team player.

4. What do you enjoy most about working here?

Asking someone who knows firsthand about a company is the best way to get an idea of what it’s really like — so ask your interviewer! It’s a polite and professional way of asking someone in an interview situation personal information, without crossing the line.

It gives your interviewer a chance to talk a little bit about themselves, and it’s also a great way to figure out if the position is really what you want.

5. How can I add value to the team?

Instead of asking “what is expected of me?” in an interview, it’s better to phrase the question in a way that emphasizes your consideration of the company and the future potential team you’ll be a part of. Ask what the vision is for the role, and then elaborate on how you think you embody that vision.

6. What is one challenge that comes along with this role?

Again, asking for one definitive answer is something that benefits both you as an interviewee but also helps the interviewer. It allows them to focus their answers in order to provide succinct details about the position, and it gives you a single, solid idea of what would be expected of you in the role.

7. What is a fun fact about this company?

Interviews, depending on the position you’re going for, can be pretty dry. While you should never delve into extremely personal information, one way to make things a little more interesting is to ask for a fun anecdote or fact about the company you hope to work for. This gives the interviewer a break from the same old questions, while still giving you more background on the company.

Read the original article on POPSUGAR Smart Living. Copyright 2016. Follow POPSUGAR Smart Living on Twitter.

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Job…interviews. Here’s everything you need to know about nailing them so you can get through it stress-free.

10. First, Get The Interview

Before you can ace your interview, you have to actually get the interview. That means making an awesome resumé and making sure it gets through. Check out our top 10 ways to rock your resumé and make sure to avoid the items that can kill your chances at getting the job (like a long history of unemployment). Once you’re done, don’t just send it in with the rest. Use your connections and a bit of ingenuity to beat that computerized system and get your resumé into the right hands. If you don’t get the interview, find out why and use that to help you the next time around.

9. Prepare Ahead Of Time

the main reason most people suck at interviews is a lack of preparation. So, find out as much as you can about the company, research the job and formulate a strategy to stand out in that interview among all the other candidates. Getting a cheat sheet together and studying it can help you out, too.

8. Make A Good First Impression

Your job interview starts the second you walk in the door, so be ready. Practice walking into a room if you have to. But more than anything, learn how first impressions work and do everything you can to make a good one: be on time, dress and groom yourself well and be aware of your body language. Remember, just giving a damn will go a long way in your first impression — if you don’t want to be there, they’ll know.

7. Tackle The Tough Questions

Once you’re inside, it’s time for the hard part: answering the interview questions. Know the questions you’ll be expected to answer backwards and forwards and do some extra research on answering the really tough ones, like “what is your biggest weakness“, “have you ever been fired“, “tell me about a challenge you faced with a coworker“, or even just the ever-vague “tell me about yourself“. Most of your answers will probably follow a specific pattern, so when in doubt, fall back on the STAR technique. But most of all: learn why they’re asking you each question and tailor your responses to their hidden motives. Don’t be afraid to dance around questions you’d rather not answer, too.

6. Ask Some Questions Yourself

Your interviewer shouldn’t be the only one asking questions. This is your chance to not only make a good impression, but learn a bit more about the job you’re applying for. Ask a few questions that will make you look good, as well as some questions that’ll show you whether this is the right job for you. With the right questions prepared, you’ll be one step ahead of the competition.

5. Emphasise Your Good Qualities

You’ll probably feel the need to be humble, but don’t. Shameless self-promotion is a good thing in job interviews. In fact, it’s the only thing you can really do to showcase your good qualities. If you don’t have experience to tout, remember that potential is actually more valuable than experience: if you can show why you’re a promising hire, you’re in.

4. Avoid The Common Pitfalls

So you’ve learned what to do, but it’s also important to know what to avoid. Even something as simple as negative body language can sabotage your chances, so make sure you aren’t hurting yourself without knowing it. Research the subjects you should avoid and make sure you don’t overshare, particularly when it comes to your personal life. As long as you don’t raise any red flags, you should be good to go.

3. Recover When Things Go South

Hopefully, with the right preparation, your interview will go smoothly. But, if you end up answering a question terribly or hit a common brick wall (like claims of “overqualification”), learn how to turn the tide quickly so you can get back on good footing. If you leave the interview thinking the whole thing was a disaster, you can always request a second interview explaining the problems you had, too.

2. Follow Up Afterwards

Don’t let your interview be the last they hear from you. If you follow up afterwards, you’ll help them remember who you are and make sure your resume doesn’t fall into the abyss of the forgotten. Send a thank you note after your interview and a short email later on to check in if you haven’t heard back. Take into account how you’ve been communicating with them so far, though, as different modes of communication may be more beneficial. If you have a follow up interview, be sure to nail that too.

1. If You Don’t Get Hired, Find Out Why

Not every interview will be a winner, sadly, even if you do everything right. If you don’t get hired, the best thing you can do is find out why and apply that knowledge to your next round of interviews. Look back on your interview and think about what you could have done better, whether it’s avoiding the “overqualification” trap or just simply using better grammar. There are any number of reasons someone might not hire you and all you can do is use this round as practice for your next interview.

By: Whitson Gordon Title illustration by Tina Mailhot-Roberge. See more at http://www.lifehacker.com.au/2013/01/top-10-tips-for-acing-your-next-job-interview/