Posts Tagged “new”

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So you just landed a leadership role at a new company. Congratulations! Going in, you know there’ll be a learning curve when it comes to handling your new responsibilities. But there’s also the people factor to consider.

Being the boss of a completely new team also means influencing a group of employees you don’t know very well to work together (and with you) toward a common goal. Nerve-racking, yes. But not impossible!

Even seasoned leaders make mistakes when managing a new team. Here are four common ones to avoid if you want to make your transition as smooth as possible for both you and your direct reports.

Mistake #1: Acting Before Understanding
If you think the first thing you need to do when joining a new team is to start making changes—slow down. Yes, part of your role is to help things run better, and you were most likely hired to bring in some new perspectives and fix some outdated or dysfunctional strategies. But ignoring input from experienced team members—particularly those who have been at the company for a while—won’t win you any fans.

Instead, you’ll signal to your team that you’re only interested in running a one-person show. And it will leave you vulnerable to making bad decisions that could’ve been avoided had you gotten some context.

This isn’t to say that you need to form a whole committee to make decisions on every little thing. You’re the boss, after all, and sometimes it’s your duty to make the final call. But strive to implement changes (especially big ones) in baby steps and over time. Be receptive to (and ask for!) feedback from your team before moving forward, and communicate your intentions clearly and proactively when you do.

Mistake #2: Constantly Talking About the “Old Job”
Do you find yourself saying all too frequently, “At my old job, we…”? Maybe you’re trying to prove yourself by bringing up your old wins. Or you may just feel comfortable referring back to a time when everything didn’t feel so foreign. (Being the new kid on the block isn’t easy.)

Here’s the thing: Your current team will quickly tune you out if you’re constantly talking about how things were done at your previous company. They want to see that you’re able (and willing!) to adapt to a new environment, and that you can competently lead and work with their unique skill sets.

Yes, you achieved great things in your last role. But don’t get caught living in the past—it’s time to focus on creating new wins with what your new team has to offer.

Mistake #3: Hiding in Your Office
Closing your office door or hiding behind your monitor can give off the appearance that you’re not interested in being there for your employees.

You may think, “I’ve told my team they can come to me any time with questions.” But as the saying goes, actions speak louder than words, and it can be intimidating for employees to knock on a new boss’ door. There’ll be times when you’ll need (or want) to close the door, and that’s OK—but make sure this doesn’t create a barrier between you and your team.

Make a conscious effort to show your employees that they’re welcome to come seek guidance or share concerns. Literally keeping your door open helps, so does providing “office hours” or popping your head out every few hours or so to see how everyone’s doing.

If you work in an open office, try to avoid wearing headphones all day, and when you can, sit near your team. You can also schedule weekly touch-base meetings with your direct reports so you have dedicated face time with them on a regular basis—and so that they know they will always have the opportunity to discuss something with you.

Mistake #4: Believing You Don’t Need to Know the Details of Your Employees’ Work
Some people think that the role of a leader is to just tell others what to do and set expectations. But there’s more to it than that. You can’t hold employees, especially new direct reports, accountable if you don’t fully grasp what their roles entail and how they approach their work.

While you don’t need to know all of the nitty gritty details of their responsibilities, you want to do more than just care that tasks are getting done. Understanding the “how” of operations and the “whys” behind how your employees tackle them will make both you and your team function better. You’ll be able to better manage them knowing their strengths, weaknesses, and preferred forms of communication, and they’ll feel more comfortable around you and motivated to do great work with the knowledge that you’re invested in their success.

Take the time when you’re just starting out to talk to each employee individually to learn about what they do, what their current challenges are, and how their tasks fit into team or company goals. You can even ask the following questions in your next one-on-one:

What challenges are you facing that are making you less productive?
What’s missing from the team that will help make everyone’s life easier?
How do you like to receive constructive feedback?
What are you hoping to learn from me that will support you in your role?
What do you enjoy the most about your work?
Or you can have them fill out this user manual so you have all the information you need about their working style.

Mistakes are going to happen when you’re starting a new job, whether you’re a manager or not, so don’t be too hard on yourself if you don’t get things “right” the first time. Even just reading this article means you care deeply about being a good boss to your new team—and that’s a great place to be in!

Most importantly, make sure you enjoy this new beginning—because it’s one more phase in your career that will help you grow and become the kind of leader you want to be.
Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/common-mistakes-starting-new-job-boss?ref=recently-published-1

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A room full of tech start up founders, investors and members of the innovation ecosystem gathered in Newcastle in late February as the Business Centre sought to unearth more local tech talent to become part of its Start House accelerator program.

Innovators and entrepreneurs were given the chance to meet with leaders of the local innovation ecosystem and hear what Start House can offer them.

More Discovery Sessions are being held in Singleton, Wyong and Maitland as Start House builds four region-based cohorts to lead through its unique distributed incubator and accelerator model.
Steve Wait, CEO of the Business Centre, said the Discovery Session gave local intenders or those already with a minimum viable product a chance to meet mentors and experts in residence and understand the advantages of the unique Start House program.

“Start House is a no-equity incubator and accelerator program with the aim of mentoring some of the incredible local tech talent we have in the region to lead them to scale their businesses globally,” Steve said.

“We have the intention of developing diversity in innovation – be it diversity in location or diversity in the age, background or life stage of the founders.

“Not every start up or existing business fits the mould that other accelerator programs may cater for.”

Powered by the Business Centre, Steve said Start House will support 50 start up and globally scalable enterprises across the region over the next year.

“Start House will provide mentoring and business education to entrepreneurs right across our region, working with partners in Maitland, Newcastle, the Hunter and on the Central Coast,” Steve said.

“We will connect more diverse innovators to the opportunities in Sydney while showcasing innovators who are geographically isolated.”

The Business Centre announced recently that it was the recipient of $189,500 in Australian Government funding under the Incubator Support initiative for its accelerator program, Start House.

Minister for Industry, Science and Technology Karen Andrews congratulated the Business Centre and the other five national successful applicants, which received the funding under the $23 million initiative.

 

Source: https://www.hunterheadline.com.au/hh/business-news/innovators-set-take-part-new-regional-incubator-accelerator-program/

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CAKE and chocolate are two of life’s pleasures that Alesha Thompson has always loved to eat – and create.

She grew up learning the ins and outs of old-fashioned baking from scratch – scones, sponges and gingernut biscuits – from her grandmother Grace on the family’s farm property in the Hunter Valley.

She was hooked from the age of 10.

“My Nan was famous for her coffee sponges in the area and her gingernuts, too, so I started off with those basic biscuits and cakes,” Thompson says.

“All of her cooking was from scratch. She hardly ever used bottled anything.

“She loved creating, and loved cooking for the family and friends, and the community. It’s what she did. It was her passion and she really passed that, and those skills, on to me.”

Two years ago, Thompson decided to leave behind a career in business administration to embark on a career as a chocolatier with the launch of her brand, Madam Cocoa.

She runs the entire operation on her own, moulding and decorating 600 chocolates a week out of her commercial premises in Newcastle.

After studying under master chocolatier Dean Gibson at TAFE NSW Hamilton campus and Melbourne pastry chef Paul Kennedy at Savour School, Thompson ditched the idea of opening a cafe to focus on chocolate.

“Studying and learning to create chocolate, it just really sung to me and my personality, and my perfectionist streak,” Thompson says.

“I fell in love with it, so I’ve run with it since then. The process of making chocolate is just so precise and finite that everything about it has to be perfect. Everything has to occur in the perfect time, environment and space.

“It all has to align for the end product to come together beautifully. It’s a far more intricate process and it resonated with me at a core level a lot more than what a cake does.

“I love the artistic side of it and creating amazing fillings.”

Madam Cocoa’s entire range is packaged gift box-style and features 12 flavours in white, milk or dark using Belgian Callebaut couverture chocolate, including botanical mint, espresso, raspberry splash, Caribbean cherry, salt flake caramel, hazelnut crisp, vanilla smooth, lemon tang, Mrs Jones blueberry cheesecake and creme coconut, which is sprayed teal blue with flecks of white and gold.

Each morsel is meticulously decorated like a piece of edible art.

Another is the Valley Mango which is Thompson’s vision of summer encapsulated into a chocolate.

“When you bite into it, it has this beautiful mango jelly and this intense mango puree through that, and then the ganache has Hunter Valley Distillery’s mango liqueur through it. It’s a delicious absorption of summer on your palette,” she says.

“It’s not too intense, it’s just a beautiful blend.”

Thompson, who says she is a “dark chocolate fan, all the way”, is in the process of developing three new products in time for Valentine’s Day which will be available to order online or in-store at Pork Ewe Deli in Mayfield and Cooks Hill (online orders for Valentine’s Day need to be placed no later than February 10).

She already has plans for a Christmas range later in the year.

Her beloved Nan passed away in June last year. Fortunately, Thompson was able to spent time in the kitchen with her earlier in the year.

“She was a driving force behind my career change and she was very encouraging about me taking on a food-based career and being creative, so she was an amazing support. She loved taste-testing the new products and seeing how it all came together. She loved being a part of it, so it was great to have her as part of the initial journey.”

 
Source: https://www.theherald.com.au/story/5842066/crafting-a-new-career-in-cocoa/

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HGT Australia and the University of Newcastle have signed a five-year deal that will see students of the training group gain credits and pathways into university.

 The contract opens up a serious of guaranteed credit and direct entry pathway arrangements for international students graduating at HGT Australia to progress onto various Bachelor degrees at the University of Newcastle. Better known locally as Novaskill, HGT Australia launched its International College in 2015.

Head of HGT’s International College Mr John Liddicoat said though HGT had campuses in other cities, Newcastle was its original home and it was fitting to have the deal in place with the university, with “two of Newcastle’s long established educational institutions working side by side.”

 

Source: https://www.theherald.com.au/story/5658012/hgt-in-pathway-deal-with-university-of-newcastle/

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A new Australian program, including an interactive website and app, has been developed specifically for small business owners to give them practical resources and tools to improve their mental health and wellbeing.

In NSW, the small business sector makes up almost 98 per cent of all businesses, employs 1.51 million people, contributes approximately $41.61 billion in annual wages and salaries and contributes more than $269.32 billion to annual sales and service income.

Ahead for Business will be activated initially in three sites across NSW in October – Lake Macquarie, Singleton and Parramatta. Local business owners are being invited to register to attend a free event in each area to find out more and network with other locals in small business.

The program has been developed by Hunter-based mental health and suicide prevention institute, Everymind, in partnership with the icare Foundation and NSW small business owners.

Everymind Director, Jaelea Skehan said Ahead for Business was designed following research conducted in 2017 into the stressors small business owners face and the gaps in existing support for this sector.

Jaelea said small businesses are the backbone of the economy and the community. Yet, until recently, there has been very little focus on the wellbeing of small business owners.

“Small business owners face a range of stressors including long working hours, feeling obliged to work when sick, multiple responsibilities, and financial stress,” Jaelea said.

“We also know from our research that many small business owners were concerned about the impact of the business on the family and many were feeling disconnected or isolated in their business.”

A survey of more than 440 small business owners showed they had higher levels of symptoms of depression and anxiety than the national average. Stress levels were high too with 57.6 per cent falling outside the normal range.

Jaelea said the website and app will help people to assess their current situation and direct them to relevant information and available supports tailored to their specific needs. It also enables people to identify simple things they can include in their everyday routine and provides templates to develop their own Business Mental Health Plan.

“Ahead for Business not only builds awareness about the importance of mental health and wellbeing within the small business community, it connects people immediately with tools, resources and supports,” Jaelea said.

“We listened to small business owners and the online screening tools and resources on the Ahead for Business portal can be accessed discreetly, 24 hours a day from home or work, to help to prevent and manage stressors and support early help-seeking.

“Whether people are new to small business, are running a side hustle or have many years of experience in business, it is important they are encouraged to focus on the most important asset that their business has – themselves.”

She said the upcoming information events are a great opportunity for small business owners in Lake Macquarie and Singleton to be the first to start using the program and the range of tailored supports it provides.

The Lake Macquarie event is being held in partnership with Lake Macquarie Combined and Southlake Business Chambers, the Business Growth Centre and Lake Macquarie Art Gallery. The Singleton event is being held in partnership with The Rural Adversity Mental Health Program and Singleton Business Chamber. Joining Jaelea to speak at the trial site events are: Workplace Psychologist, David Burroughs; Founder of Billy Goat Soap, Leanne Faulkner; and former Wallaby Player and Founder of the social network Karma, Clyde Rathbone.

 

Source: https://www.hunterheadline.com.au/hh/business-news/new-program-keep-hunter-small-business-owners-mentally-healthy/

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Newcastle Airport has increased the number of public car parking spaces with the official opening of a new car park on 8 June to cater for passenger growth.

An extra 345 spaces have been created following a major development off Kindler Way, which includes additional long-term parking, dedicated staff parking and rental car storage.

The development brings the total number of public car parking spaces at Newcastle Airport to over 2,100 bays.

“These extra spaces will help meet the increasing need for car parking following on-going growth and record passenger numbers,” said Newcastle Airport CEO, Dr Peter Cock.

In 2017, Newcastle Airport welcomed a record 1.28 million passengers, 25-month consecutive year-on-year monthly passenger growth and an extra 85,000 airline seats.

The people of the Hunter and Central Coast love to travel and with new destinations, great value fares and connectivity to the world it’s smarter to use Newcastle Airport.

“We are constantly striving to improve the experience and convenience for all who visit Newcastle Airport; this is another step forward in meeting the needs of the local community.

We now have the most car parking spaces and product options we have ever had, and are ready to welcome the influx of travellers jetting away to enjoy the June long weekend,’’ said Peter.

The Airport website’s transport guide has extensive information about transport choices and on-site car parking options, including an online car parking calculator, giving passengers all the information they need to make the best choice to suit all individual travel needs and budget.

 

Source: http://www.hbrmag.com.au/article/read/new-airport-car-park-ready-2797

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The first 90 days of your new job are crucial to set yourself up for long-term career success. It’s where you make good on the promises you touted during your interview and set the stage for how people perceive you.

That’s why asking for feedback during this time is so, so important. It quickly demonstrates to your new boss that you’re invested, you’re committed to excellence, and that you’re in this for the long haul.

Plus, if done well, you can earn major brownie points that may help you get recognized later for opportunities to work on interesting projects or even advance more quickly.

Easy enough, right? Now that you know just how important your first 90 days are, here are some guidelines for how to ask for feedback to ensure you’re on the right path (or how to get on it).

When Should You Ask?

Eliciting feedback in these crucial first few days is a balance between giving your new manager and co-workers enough time to form concrete thoughts and opinions of you, while also being proactive in prompting feedback that will help you as you get onboarded.

Rule of thumb: Don’t expect a formal review by the end of week one. After that, it’s all a judgement call. How much real work have you actually had a chance to do? If you’ve just completed a big project or finished a tougher assignment, now may be the perfect time to ask for some input on how you did. Regardless of the above, don’t let three weeks go by without making the big ask.

A good rhythm for how frequently you continue to check-in will hinge on the volume and involvement of your work. That said, a good best practice is no more than once a week, but no less than once a month.

How Should You Ask?

Don’t pounce at the water cooler or in the bathroom while your boss is washing her hands. Reach out to your manager via email or in person and request a meeting directly. Explain what the meeting is for—people will appreciate having a heads-up so they can prepare ideas ahead of time.

Try something like, “I’d like 15 minutes of your time to talk about how you think things are going so far with me. Are you satisfied with what I’m doing, and the work I’m producing? Is there anything I can be doing differently?”

What Should You Ask?

Give your manager suggestions on what you want to hear, such as, “How am I integrating within the team?” “Am I operating at the speed you need me to?” or “How is the quality of my work? Any development areas you have already identified that I can work on?”

This is also the time to coach your manager on what you need in terms of resources. Would you benefit from regular one-on-ones or additional training? Perhaps a tracking system that you and your manager have access to to share what you’re working on?

Who Should You Ask?

Besides your boss, co-workers are also a great resource for feedback. While it doesn’t need to be as formal as with a manager, try crafting an email along the lines of, Hey, I’m loving it here so far, and would love to get some feedback from you to make sure I’m setting myself up for long term success. It’s really important to me I’m doing a good job and making a good impression.

The reality of soliciting feedback is that it may not always be 100% positive. So, prepare yourself mentally. All your good intentions will immediately be nullified if you go into “defensive” mode. Keep your ego out of this conversation and stay open and non-judgmental.

Then, send a follow-up email thanking your manager or colleague for their time and candor, and briefly outline your takeaways and any next steps you plan to take. Implement any areas of improvement right away and follow-up with your boss to make sure the adjustments you’re making are correct and noticed.

We know there’s a lot to learn in your first 90 days. You’ve got new systems, technologies, faces, and names to remember, and so much more. It’s easy to feel overwhelmed.

Incorporating this advice displays maturity and commitment on your part, and will also give you a good indication of whether you’re doing well, or need to make some adjustments before its too late. Regardless of what you learn, it will empower you to excel in your new role.

 

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/how-to-ask-for-feedback-first-90-days-successful-new-job

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Your first few weeks at a new job can be exhilarating. It’s often fast-paced and full of brand new things that can reignite a spark that you lost. After all, that might’ve been your reason for looking for this new gig in the first place.

But, it can also be overwhelming. And when you look at all the meetings on your calendar, you might think that your goal is to survive it. You can always go back and re-learn anything you missed this week, right?

And in a lot of ways, that’s true. Nobody expects you to master everything you learn during your first month, especially when it comes to understanding the finer details about your company. But there is an important question you should ask in every meeting you have (when it makes sense, of course):

How can my work make your life easier?

You might be thinking, “I barely know where the coffee machine is! How can I think about helping anyone else right now?” And that’s totally fair. But on my first day at my current job, my boss suggested that I set up meetings with everyone on my team and ask each of them this question. It was terrifying, and if I’m being honest, I really didn’t want to do it. But I didn’t want to disappoint my new boss more, so I got over my fear and piped up.

And when I did, I was pleasantly surprised by how it went.

Some people had really strong opinions. Others told me that they hadn’t even thought about it, but appreciated that I opened the conversation with that question. But what I ultimately learned was that your intro meetings don’t have to be a one-way street.

As much as you have to learn, it’s important to remember that you were hired to bring something different to the table—and you can do that as early as your first week on the job.

Again, I’m not going to pretend that this won’t be uncomfortable. I also understand that in some meetings, this will be seen as completely out-of-context. But when the opportunity presents itself and it feels like the next natural thing to say—challenge yourself to say it.

And then, before you worry you’re putting too much on your plate, know that you can respond with, “That’s really interesting to hear, once I’m completely onboarded, I’d love to find more time to discuss how can I start making this happen.”

I know. Asking this question might not make your first month any easier, but it’ll make the exact right impression on your new team. Not to mention, it’ll set you up to prioritize your tasks correctly. So take a deep breath and do it!

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/the-best-question-to-ask-when-youre-new-at-work?ref=carousel-slide-3

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IF you’ve ever wanted a captive audience to show the best sides of Newcastle, here is your chance to shine.

Roughly 120 accredited guides will be chosen to promote Newcastle in a Newcastle City Council bid to spread civic pride to the city’s growing numbers of visitors and tourists.

The NEW Crew, established with Training Services NSW and TAFE NSW, will give guides free training to help showcase Newcastle’s tourism and hospitality hotspots to the city’s visitors.

“We are seeing more and more major events choose Newcastle as a host city,” interim chief executive Jeremy Bath said.

“From Socceroos, Matildas and Wallabies to Supermoto and Supercars, we’ve proven to be gracious hosts and we want to build on this reputation by having guides on hand.”

 Total visitor nights in Newcastle rose to 2.6 million last year according to Tourism Research Australia, a 9.7 per cent rise on the previous year’s figures.

With potential for international flights into Williamtown and a new cruise terminal, Mr Bath said the city was well positioned to maintain the trend.

Anyone interested in becoming a guide as part of the NEW Crew can email tourism@ncc.nsw.gov.au for more information.

Source: http://www.theherald.com.au/story/4894641/keen-guides-to-showcase-our-citys-best/

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The NRL has reached agreement with the Wests Group in Newcastle for it to take ownership and operation of the Newcastle Knights.

NRL CEO Todd Greenberg said today the agreement was a great outcome for the Newcastle Knights, the Newcastle community and the game.

“We always said future ownership needed to be good for the club, the community and the game and we’ve secured that outcome through this agreement with Wests,” Mr Greenberg said.

“When the NRL took over the Knights in 2014 we needed to secure the financial future of the club and then deliver the best possible ownership to run the club into the future.

“Those goals have been achieved and there is now every opportunity for the Knights to become a powerhouse of the game in the years ahead.

“Wests are ideal owners of the Knights given their strong Rugby League heritage and their strength in the local community.”

Under the agreement, Wests have pledged to invest up to $10 million in a Centre of Excellence for the Knights and spend a further $2.5 million on grassroots Rugby League in the Hunter region over the next five years.

“In other words, the focus is on building a strong Hunter region junior league pathway as well as providing world class facilities for the players so they can compete with the best in the NRL,” Mr Greenberg said.

Mr Greenberg praised the Wests Board, headed by Owen Kilpatrick and CEO Philip Gardner for their commitment to the future of the Knights and Rugby League in the region.

“The Knights are in good hands,” he said.

Newcastle Knights Chairman Brian McGuigan AM said the Board and management had done a great job, meeting its commitment to the NRL to stabilise the club and prepare the Knights for transition to new ownership.

“Our task was to implement stronger financial, operational and governance structures at the club which we have done,” he said.

“While our performances on the field have not met our ambitions, we are handing over a club in better shape than we inherited, positioned to compete strongly in the coming seasons.”

Knights CEO Matt Gidley said he was confident of a smooth transition to Wests ownership.

“Our focus is to ensure there is minimal disruption to the players, the club and the fans over the coming months,” he said.

“Our fans have been unbelievably loyal and supportive during a tough period but I think this agreement will signal the start of a new era for the Knights.”

A plebiscite of Wests members will begin today.  With their support, the transition of ownership will begin next month with completion and full ownership on 31 October.

Source: https://www.nrl.com/new-ownership-of-newcastle-knights-announced/tabid/10874/newsid/110240/default.aspx

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Newcastle visual artist Paul Maher is ready for a change of scenery – at least for a little while.

Maher has been notified that he has been successful in his application for an artist-in-residency stint at the Gatekeeper’s Cottage in Police Point Park in Portsea, Victoria. The residency program is managed by Mornington Shire Council.

In return for two weeks of residency at the historic cottage, Maher will teach some workshops on using the Brushes visual paint application on iPads to local school students.

The big draw for Maher is the opportunity to research his own new artworks.

“I’m really excited about being a recluse on the peninsula for two weeks,” he says. “I am trying to take something from here and make it unique to that place.”

He will take his field drawings and sketches from his Mornington Peninsula visit back to Newcastle to make finished works. He says he hopes to put on a “pop-up” show in Victoria to show the final artworks.

“I”ve been doing it that way for the last seven years, with the same subject matter,” he says. “I’m looking to extend what I do to a different part of the coast.”

I’m looking to extend what I do to a different part of the coast.- Paul Maher

Maher’s own recent practice has seen his works capture “the edges where the built environment meets the open space of a street, park or coastal walk”.

He recently participated in a show with fellow artists Dino Consalvo and Peter Lankas at the University of Newcastle gallery. Maher’s large-scale works continued his reflections on the Newcastle coastline and life around its public spaces and adjoining suburbia.

Maher has been a finalist in the Kilgour Art Prize, and is  working in his Hamilton studio on his entry for this year.

He’s also working with Newcastle ceramic artist John Cliff, who he has collaborated with previously, notably on pavement mosaics on Beaumont Street in Hamilton after the 1989 earthquake. Maher will experiment with some glazes/art on vases made by Cliff.

Source: Newcastle Herald

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THE new year has brought a smattering of new childcare businesses in Newcastle, with most citing demand for a growing shortage of vacancies in the region as their motivator.

Warners Bay centre Little Beginnings has opened its second, 92-place facility in Hillsborough Road and newcomer Creative Childcare has opened in Kotara with plans to open at least five centres in Newcastle and surrounds this year. In Waratah, purpose-built The Hub is run by veteran educators Raylee Davies and Nicole Denzin, who opened their first The Hub centre in Mayfield a year ago.

The pair met while teaching at Belmont Christian College and job-shared the role of director of Mayfield Community Preschool.

A restructure of government funding two years ago that potentially threatened the pre-school’s numbers led she and Mrs Denzin to start The Hub, which offers long day care hours and a focus on “holistic” quality care.

It opened on January 9 and is taking new enrolments.

“Council is saying there is demand, well we are not full and I am concerned but I feel happy because we are at 50 per cent capacity and we have only been open three days,” says Mrs Denzin.

A council spokesperson said council had received 24 development applications with a reference to child care in the past year. Of those, 15 have been approved, with one refused and nine still to be determined.

The Hub aspires for childcare that goes beyond best practice and its “heart and vision”, says Mrs Davies, is “that we become an extension of home for our families and children”.  It has seven rooms and “free flow” design, with indoor rooms all connected to the outdoors to maximise interaction between the two spaces in a natural setting.

Creative Childcare co-founder Craig Neil said the business will add as many as 400 places in planned centres in Newcastle, Warabrook and Hamilton this year.

“We want to raise the bar in the provision of childcare in the area,” he said.

The centre incorporates creative learning principles including music, art, dance and food into its curriculum.

Source: http://www.theherald.com.au/story/4411301/growth-spurt-in-care/?cs=4200