Posts Tagged “review”

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Hunter Wetlands Centre will undergo a review of its business operations after receiving a $25,000 grant from the NSW government.

Parliamentary Secretary for the Hunter, Scot MacDonald MLC, announced the funding on Thursday at the centre in Shortland.

The Newcastle Herald reported in May how the Hunter Wetlands Centre (HWC) board was seeking funding for a comprehensive review.

It had not replaced an outgoing CEO after a drop in visitors and concerns about the centre’s long-term viability.

“I’m pleased to be able to announce an inter-agency response to fund a strategic business review of the Hunter Wetlands Centre operations,” Mr MacDonald said.

“I thank those that have contributed to supporting the HWC, including Hunter Water Corporation, NSW Office of Environment and Heritage, and NSW Office of Regional Development.”

“This business review will examine how to ensure the HWC remains sustainable to continue its important environmental, educational and social functions.”

The $25,000 grant comes after a $146,820 state government grant in June to upgrade the visitor centre.

“It is essential for the iconic Wetlands Centre to be more financially sustainable in the future, and the business review is a critical part of this renewal process,” HWC chair David Crofts said.

“We want to continue to deliver the best possible environmental, education and visitor services.”

“The funding will enable the Wetlands Centre to undertake a thorough professional review of its operations. We will use these funds to engage an external expert to help us ensure our operations are as efficient as possible and well targeted to our needs.”

A $4,750 grant was also received for HWC’s freckled duck program.

The centre has kept freckled ducks in captivity since 1993, successfully breeding over 150 ducks from an original crop of 17.

The duck’s nursery and holding shelter will be upgraded through a range of works, including relining the nursery pond and providing mains water to the holding shelter.

Source: https://www.theherald.com.au/story/5510256/hunter-wetlands-centre-lands-funding-for-critical-business-review/

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You’ve waited months for this moment—the chance to prove your worth to your boss and get a leg up in your career.

Let me break it to you: You won’t get what you want if you don’t prepare properly. In fact, your review will only go well if you get organized and collect all your information before the talk.

So, with that in mind, here’s what you need to do the night of your next performance review to put yourself in a great position for a productive conversation that’ll get you ahead in your career and get you on your boss’ good side:

1. Learn How to Respond to Feedback

You know not to yell (right?). But do you know there are ways to respond to negative feedback that actually make you look good?

You’re going to want to pay attention to the following because it’s possible you’ll receive some not-so-great feedback. And even if you’ve been doing fabulous work, it’s almost guaranteed you’re going to receive some form of constructive criticism (no one’s perfect, after all).

First, as Muse Career Coach Emily Liou points out in an article about handling negative feedback, own up to your mistakes and be ready to offer a solution or show initiative to do better.

And, says Muse Writer Rich Moy, avoid blurting out things like “I didn’t realize that was wrong” or “It won’t happen again!”

2. Collect Your Accomplishments

Think you deserve a raise?

It’s so important to state your case by listing out your accomplishments (including how much money you’ve made for the company, the skills you’ve learned, the relationships you’ve built, and the projects you’ve completed) over the past six months or year.

3. Review Your Current Goals

Did you set goals at your last review? Or, do you have some personal ones of your own?

Either way, reviews are a great time to look back at what you were hoping to accomplish and see if you, well, actually did them.

If you met your goals, what did you learn along the way? Which ones are you most proud of? How can you build on them in the future?

And if you didn’t achieve them, how far did you get? Did your priorities change? What held you back? What can you do differently going forward?

Jot down some notes to discuss further with your manager when you meet. Which leads me to…

4. Set Some New Goals

Now that you know how far you’ve come, now you can decide where you want to go.

Do this by setting some realistic, yet ambitious goals. Consider the following:

What skills would you like to master by your next review?
What responsibilities do you want to take on?
What projects are you passionate about pursuing?
What weaknesses would you like to improve upon?
What goals would you like to continue to build on?
What role do you want to shoot for one to three years from now? What can you do now to put yourself in the running?

5. Prepare Any Lingering Questions

Especially if one-on-one time is rare in your office, reviews are super helpful for getting some of your most burning questions answered. It could be about the status of your team or department, or the goals of the company, or possibilities for career growth (like budget to get some professional development help).

6. Prepare for a Tough Conversation

Maybe your boss will bring up some serious concerns. Maybe you even seen a performance improvement plan coming. Or, maybe it’ll be a normal review on your manager’s end, but you’re going to have to raise your hand to discuss bigger issues.

For example, now’s a good time to talk about the fact that you’re bored in your role or you’d like to consider an internal transfer.

Having these conversations is hard! But being prepared makes it a little easier.

7. Pat Yourself on the Back

Finally, give yourself some credit for making it to this big milestone. Sure, it happens every year, and you may not even receive anything special except for a simple “Great work” from your manager, but you’ve made it through what was probably a busy, exhausting, or even tumultuous period—look back on it, pat yourself on the back for everything awesome you did, and know you’re going to kick even more butt after this review.

 

Now all you have to do is double-check your review time (in case you have a jam-packed day), lay out a slightly-nicer-than-usual outfit (it doesn’t hurt), and get some beauty sleep.

And no matter what happens, because you’ve prepared, you’re sure to handle it like a champ.
Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/7-things-to-do-the-night-before-a-review-if-you-want-it-to-go-well?ref=carousel-slide-1

 

performance review 2

Performance review… this presents an opportunity for employees to demonstrate their accomplishments and distinguish themselves and their value to the organization. In this challenging economy it is important to use this critical tool to its best advantage as it has significant impact on pay, professional development and, possibly, job security. Here are ten tips to make the process work for you and make it easier for your boss to write you a terrific review.

 

 

1. Know Your Role

If you are uncertain about any aspect of your job, seek clarification. A great place to start is a detailed list of job duties or, if it is available, an official job description, from your manager or human resources department. If no description exists, use the Salary Wizard® to search for one or two jobs that are close matches to your job. You, along with your manager, can develop an appropriate description from there.

2. Be “Engaged” in the Process

Many workers are missing important opportunities to maximize their earning potential by not devoting more effort to their performance review or ensuring that they get a clear explanation of their goals and objectives. Be an active participant in establishing your goals from the start. Focus on key objectives and define a plan that makes sense for you and your employer.

3. Set Goals that are Reasonable and Relevant

When establishing goals, make sure they are meaningful. There should be value in doing a particular activity. Each goal must be relevant to the work you do each day and should be mutually agreed upon by you and your manager.

4. View goals as a project plan

Make your goals your mission for the year. Keep goals current, track progress and contributions, and update goals as appropriate to reflect any changes in your role or responsibilities. Remember that although goals are set to achieve certain work-based objectives, they can also yield personal rewards in the form of professional and developmental growth and greater earnings potential.

5. Document your accomplishments

No one pays closer attention to your work than you do. The annual performance review, and the promotion or salary increase that often goes with it, can be enhanced significantly if you highlight your accomplishments clearly and make a case for yourself. Document your accomplishments along the way and let your boss know when you have reached established milestones. If you reach a stumbling block along the way, seek advice on how to best resolve the issue.

6. Show an interest in additional training

If you don’t have access to the tools or training necessary to achieve a particular objective, be sure to ask. Your employer will see that you want to improve the quality of your work and are interested in professional growth. Additional training will make you more valuable to the organization and set you up for the next step in your career.

7. Check-in

Have an open dialogue with your boss throughout the year so you have a better sense of where you stand and how your progress is being perceived. Don’t leave all of this discussion for the annual review. Try to conduct brief, informal discussions throughout the performance review period. Taking time to check shows your boss that you are interested in performing well and are working hard toward achieving goals.

8. Share positive feedback

Feedback from colleagues and/or customers is also valuable when you are preparing for a review. If someone sends you a thank you via e-mail or on paper, keep it on file. If someone says something complimentary, ask him or her to put it in writing.

9. Demonstrate a Positive Attitude

Performance is about results, but some great performers can have bad attitudes. Employers look for employees that produce quality work and are flexible and easy to work with. Think seriously about what your general behavior conveys to those around you. Try to be “likeable” in a business sense by being pleasant, respectful and courteous to colleagues.

10. Utilize Performance Review Feedback

When you get constructive feedback during a performance review, listen to it carefully and objectively. If part of the feedback is difficult to hear, try not to appear defensive. Instead, take time to consider what was said and try to make improvements in your work habits to avoid similar comments in the future. Companies value employees who can accept professional guidance.

Source: Maura Pallera, Salary.com contributing writer. http://www.salary.com/10-tips-to-get-more-from-your-performance-review/