Youth

RDA Hunter image

On Wednesday 12 February, Regional Development Australia (RDA) Hunter and NSW Minerals Council (NSWMC) launched their new partnership, PRIME (Pathways to Resource Industry and Mining Employment).

PRIME is a two-year partnership that will see NSWMC leverage RDA Hunter’s strong reputation for implementing industry-skilling and workforce development initiatives to increase awareness of the NSW mining industry and its career opportunities.

The new collaboration will assist Hunter secondary school students better appreciate how science, maths and geography subject matter applies across the lifecycle of a mine, and the types of skills and jobs that are required to support a mining operation.

The project will include the implementation of mining-specific content, scenario-based learning activities and real-world problem solving in the classroom.

Stephen Galilee, CEO of the NSW Minerals Council said the organisation is very happy to be working with RDA Hunter to promote the breadth of mining industry career opportunities that exist in the Hunter.

“NSW’s mining sector consistently innovates to implement leading edge technology, and international best-practice across its operations. Our aim in developing this project with RDA Hunter is to build a motivated future talent pool by encouraging interest in the diverse and interesting job opportunities available in the industry,” he said.

“Mining jobs are secure and rewarding and part of the positive contribution the industry makes to communities in the Hunter and beyond. We’re looking forward to building on the work we already do in the region’s schools to support young people develop the knowledge and skills needed for a sustained mining-industry career.”

According to its Chair, John Turner, RDA Hunter works to support innovation-driven industry development and jobs growth in the Hunter and is pleased to support young people considering a mining industry career.

“The mining sector continues to be a large employer and important driver of economic growth in the Hunter region. We’re delighted to be NSW Mineral Council’s partner of choice for this new project. We have significant experience connecting Hunter schools with industry to deliver graduates with relevant industry knowledge and skills.

“We’re looking forward to working with NSW Minerals Council to hone our model for the mining industry and helping them highlight the career opportunities that will continue to exist in the sector well into the future,” Mr Turner said.

Careers Adviser and Learning Support Teacher at PRIME participating school All Saints’ College Maitland, Kim Wickham, said the real-life experience will be a great asset to students.

“As teachers of young, enthusiastic and energetic learners we know there is no better teacher than real-world life experience and we see great benefit in joining this mining industry partnership to bring that into our classrooms,” she said.

“We know mining is a sustainable employer offering a range of prosperous employment pathways for students with an interest in science, maths and geography. We are genuinely excited about this new project and keen to work with RDA Hunter again. Historically they have helped us develop strong relationships with industry which has enhanced our students’ learning and contributed to them being educated citizens of the world.”

This year the PRIME partnership will see 20 participating Hunter high schools receive 2 x Oculus VR sets and programs to give students a real mining industry experience; lesson plans pertaining to the lifecycle of a mine; real-world industry challenges set by the mining industry for resolution by student teams; and teacher professional development sessions.

IMAGE | John Turner (RDA Hunter Chair) and Stephen Galilee (CEO of NSW Minerals Council)

The project will include the implementation of mining-specific content, scenario-based learning activities and real-world problem solving in the classroom.

Stephen Galilee, CEO of the NSW Minerals Council said the organisation is very happy to be working with RDA Hunter to promote the breadth of mining industry career opportunities that exist in the Hunter.

“NSW’s mining sector consistently innovates to implement leading edge technology, and international best-practice across its operations. Our aim in developing this project with RDA Hunter is to build a motivated future talent pool by encouraging interest in the diverse and interesting job opportunities available in the industry,” he said.

“Mining jobs are secure and rewarding and part of the positive contribution the industry makes to communities in the Hunter and beyond. We’re looking forward to building on the work we already do in the region’s schools to support young people develop the knowledge and skills needed for a sustained mining-industry career.”

According to its Chair, John Turner, RDA Hunter works to support innovation-driven industry development and jobs growth in the Hunter and is pleased to support young people considering a mining industry career.

“The mining sector continues to be a large employer and important driver of economic growth in the Hunter region. We’re delighted to be NSW Mineral Council’s partner of choice for this new project. We have significant experience connecting Hunter schools with industry to deliver graduates with relevant industry knowledge and skills.

“We’re looking forward to working with NSW Minerals Council to hone our model for the mining industry and helping them highlight the career opportunities that will continue to exist in the sector well into the future,” Mr Turner said.

Careers Adviser and Learning Support Teacher at PRIME participating school All Saints’ College Maitland, Kim Wickham, said the real-life experience will be a great asset to students.

“As teachers of young, enthusiastic and energetic learners we know there is no better teacher than real-world life experience and we see great benefit in joining this mining industry partnership to bring that into our classrooms,” she said.

“We know mining is a sustainable employer offering a range of prosperous employment pathways for students with an interest in science, maths and geography. We are genuinely excited about this new project and keen to work with RDA Hunter again. Historically they have helped us develop strong relationships with industry which has enhanced our students’ learning and contributed to them being educated citizens of the world.”

This year the PRIME partnership will see 20 participating Hunter high schools receive 2 x Oculus VR sets and programs to give students a real mining industry experience; lesson plans pertaining to the lifecycle of a mine; real-world industry challenges set by the mining industry for resolution by student teams; and teacher professional development sessions.

IMAGE | John Turner (RDA Hunter Chair) and Stephen Galilee (CEO of NSW Minerals Council)

SOURCE: https://www.hunterheadline.com.au/hh/business-news/rda-hunter-nsw-minerals-council-partner-industry-skilling/

forbes

Seniors from both college and high school will be setting out to look for jobs soon. However, the education system doesn’t typically leave students ready to face the working world.

Landing a job in spring would be the ideal outcome, but graduates may not really be sure how to get employed. The critical aspect of landing a job, regardless of whether you’re leaving high school or college, is being prepared. You should have a firm grasp of what kind of a job you’re looking for and find out what the requirements for that position are.

To help, 13 experts from Forbes Human Resources Council share their insight into what high school and college grads should be doing to land a job in spring, and why those elements are of such importance.

1. Network And Practice Interviewing

Graduating can be an exciting and stressful time for seniors. It can be easy to forget the basics of job searching — networking and interviews. Remember to keep your contacts as you collaborate on projects or work with teachers for possible future letters of recommendation or job referrals. Also, practice interviewing with friends or teachers to help you be prepared for when the time comes. – Kelly Loudermilk, BuildHR, Inc.

2. Know What You’re Passionate About

Really putting thought into what they are passionate about is important in identifying the right job or career. College and high school counselors can assist with personality profiles, but talking with friends and family about what you are good at and drawn to will also help. My advice: try things! Don’t wait until you are sure. Take chances and try various options. – Diane Strohfus, Betterworks.com

3. Learn To Expand Your Personal Boundaries

The ability to set appropriate boundaries rises as a key marker of psychological well-being because we’re constantly being pulled in multiple directions. The challenge for young people is that moving into work life requires shifting personal boundaries to include the needs/demands of colleagues and team. This is a key factor for success. – Leeno Karumanchery, PhD, MESH/Diversity

4. Do Your Leg Work

Research a few companies you’re interested in and contact their HR to see if they have short-term intern programs or job shadow days. Get your foot in the door by showing eagerness to take a paid or unpaid opportunity to work in your field of interest. Potential employers are impressed by candidates that are proactive and enthusiastic. The experience will also help build your resume. – Regina Romeo, CPS HR Consulting

5. Identify Company Values You Can Get Behind

Job vacancies are at an all-time low and the fight for top talent is on! You will have a plethora of employment options. Start now to identify five to 10 companies that enact values that resonate with you. Do you value trust, hard work, efficiency? Find companies that value the same and their management philosophy will be well-aligned with your needs. Share this during the interview process to impress. – Christine Wzorek, White Label Advisors

6. Find A Mentor And Create A Plan

It can be difficult figuring out your next steps in this exciting time of your life. It’s important to set yourself up for success by preparing in advance. Network as early as possible and start planting the seed in your areas of interest with those you meet. Find a mentor already in the workforce, and create a plan for yourself with actionable steps to reach your goal by graduation. – Charles Ashworth, Copper

7. Identify What Makes You Unique

Help employers understand why you stand out from the crowd by focusing on accomplishments or attributes that make you unique and of which you are exceptionally proud. Be willing to take risks and put yourself out there. If employers aren’t connecting with who you are, those are not employers with whom you want to align yourself. You have a right to find an employer who values you! – Sherrie Suski, Tricon American Homes

8. Build Your Professional Brand

It is important that college seniors be aware of how to brand themselves in a professional manner and be aware of how they act and speak to their new environment. This may mean a social media audit, the way we dress to an interview, the way we conduct ourselves at a networking event. Branding is also about how I speak and what I speak. All the lingo of school should be left in school. – Tasniem Titus, Dentsply Sirona

9. Globalize Your Thoughts And Actions

Today’s workforce is global and multicultural. High school and college seniors can get a head start by participating in global projects and study-abroad opportunities or simply seeking a mentor globally. By demonstrating global thoughts and actions, the seniors can create a clear differentiation and announce their readiness to be successful leaders of the future. – Vineet Gambhir, Summit Partners

10. Clean Up Your Social Media Accounts

Recent graduates, go clean out your social media closet! You can bet that employers are looking at this, and if your social media looks like that of half the young people I know, it’s in dire need of an overhaul. Hide the accounts you don’t want people to see, delete embarrassing photos, get rid of any radical commentary and generally look like someone an adult wouldn’t mind employing. – Tracy Cote, Genesys

11. Make Your Resume Real-World Ready

It’s critical that employers can envision candidates as successful employees. Students with relevant internship experiences stand out for me. Employers can understand that you needed income, but if all you’ve got on your resume is bartending and babysitting, it’s harder for them to understand how you’ll contribute in their environment. – Joyce Maroney, Kronos Incorporated

12. Close Your Skills Gap

Whether it’s high school or college, students should prepare themselves for graduation by either volunteering or taking internships during holidays and vacation periods to bridge the gap between formal education and workplace needs. Students who demonstrate the skills and outcomes for which employers are looking will certainly stand out once they are ready to enter the workforce in any season. – Dr. Timothy J. Giardino, Cantata Health & Meta Healthcare IT Solutions

13. Improve Your Communication

Use every opportunity to practice your communication skills. About 70% of what we do in business relates to written and oral communication. Speak up in class every opportunity you have. Seek out chances to give oral presentations in front of peers. With experience, your skills will only improve so the key is seizing every opportunity you have to become a better communicator. – Heide Abelli, Skillsoft

Source: https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbeshumanresourcescouncil/2019/11/25/getting-ready-to-join-the-workforce-13-tips-for-high-school-and-college-seniors/#2d71f60234a8

fya

Ok team, Listen here. There is something really important we need to chat about. The Foundation for Young Australians (that’s us) released a new report that analysed 4.2 million job ads from the past 3 years and have sussed out what skills are most wanted by employers.
The great news is, you probably already have a lot of them, you just might not realise it.

The report, titled New Basics, is the latest in our New Work Order series that looks at the critical skills we all need to succeed in the changing world of work.

We can all agree that this kind of BIG DATA is a BIG DEAL so we’re going to break it down for you so you can make your next job application really stand out.

Here’s the skinny on which skills had the biggest increase in demand over the past 3 years:

Digital literacy is up by 212%
Creativity is up by 65%
Critical thinking is up by 158%
Presentation skills are up by 23%
Not only is the demand for these skills increasing, but jobs that want people with these skills are offering more cash as well. So if you want fat stacks, you’re going to need to know how to do these things.

When compared with similar jobs that don’t request these specific skills

Jobs that ask for presentation skills will score you an extra $8,853 / year
Jobs that ask for digital literacy will hand over an extra $8,648 / year
Jobs that request problem solving will cough up an extra $7,745 / year
Long story short, it’s pretty clear that learning these skills is well worth your time.

What this means in reality is that young people can no longer only rely on technical skills they might have studied for (think engineering, architecture, accounting, medicine) but they also need to be armed with a toolkit of what we call ‘enterprise skills’ to get the best jobs.

The great news for you is that you have most likely already developed and demonstrated these enterprise skills, you just need to be able to package them up in a way that makes it clear to future employers that you’ve got what it takes to get the job done.

When you’re working on your next job application or in an interview, here are some hot tips for selling your enterprise skill set:

Digital Literacy – demand up by 212%

The great news about this one is that a lot of young people already know a lot about this.

We know what’s #trending and have sussed out that virus is bad and viral is good. We have first hand experience of what might make one app great and another really clunky.

To talk about this skill in your resume you might want to mention if you run your own Instagram account, if you’ve ever promoted an event online, built a website or if you’ve used excel to input data about any given thing (best hot chips in your city, how much homework you need to do, budgeting etc).

Creativity – demand up by 65%

Lots of people are probably reading this one and thinking ‘But I’m not creative’. Dear friends, that is simply not true. We have all done creative things, trust me.

If you’ve ever had to present an assignment in a visual way? That’s creative. Ever built a Power Point presentation or video? That’s creative. Ever faceswapped on Snapchat with a couch cushion? That’s v creative (you weirdo).

You might present yourself creatively in the way you dress, the music you listen to or your Tumblr layout.

Critical thinking – up by 158%

This one sounds way fancier than it is. It is probably something you do all the time without realising.

If you’ve ever thought about how something could function better or more efficiently in your workplace or school, that’s critical thinking.

If you’ve ever been able to look at an issue in the media and see a different side of the story, that’s critical thinking.

If you’ve ever been able to reflect on a party you’ve thrown and realised that you definitely didn’t nail the good cheese to cracker ratio, then you’re a critical thinker.

Presentation skills – up by 23%

This one is kind of obvious. By nature of attending school at some stage you’ve probably had to present in front of groups.

If you can’t think of something formal you might think of a time you trained someone new at your casual job or when you inspired your sports team with a killer half-time rev up speech. It could even be when you addressed a group while planning a school assignment. Any time you’ve communicated clearly, you’ve presented!

Wouldn’t it be nice to learn about these employable skills in school?

Now, while we think it’s super important that you know how to sell yourself and your enterprise skills, we don’t think it’s only up you.

We think that the results of this report speak pretty loud and clear and that enterprise skills like digital literacy, critical thinking and project management need to be taught in schools. From primary school, and all the way through to uni.

We’re also keen to see young people properly exposed to the job skills they’ll need; so we’re talking great work experience placements and immersive on job learning.

If you’re thinking that it would have been nice to learn a little more about these skills in the classroom, maybe show your teacher this article? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

 

 

 

Source: https://www.fya.org.au/2016/04/20/here-are-the-skills-you-will-need-to-succeed-and-earn-big-buckaroos/?gclid=CjwKCAiA5JnuBRA-EiwA-0ggPQQ9EqVdCu88ILsEoSLhoOTAivgV3qUEIZ_3oTMbFoSA2JDVAFjdshoC5_IQAvD_BwE

Cessnock youth off street

Young people in Kurri Kurri and surrounding areas now have a place to meet new friends, get help with school work and seek information on a range of services.

Youth Off The Streets’ Hunter Valley Outreach has officially opened its drop-in centre at 35 Station Street, Weston.

The drop-in centre is located next door to the service’s former premises, which had room for office space and not much else.

Hunter Valley Outreach manager Kim Lenard said it was a goal of hers to move into the bigger space since she started with the service eight months ago.

“The young people are pretty excited to have somewhere extra to go,” she said.

The drop-in centre will operate on weekday afternoons, and Ms Lenard said she hopes other community organisations will be able to use the space earlier in the day.

Along with office space for Ms Lenard and her three staff, the new site has games tables, books and space for young people to socialise.

Youth Off The Streets’ director of outreach services Ranna Peera said while its outreach programs are mainly focused on visiting areas where youth already congregate (such as skate parks), the drop-in centre provides young people with an added option to access its services.

“It’s not a typical thing for us, but we have trialled it, and it has worked,” she said.

“It’s an added option that could be of great benefit for young people.”

Paterson MP Meryl Swanson conducted the official opening on Thursday afternoon.

Ms Swanson – who grew up in Heddon Greta – said the drop-in centre could make a difference in the lives of local youth.

“I know what it feels like to be a kid from a town where there’s not a lot to do sometimes,” she said.

“There’s no beach on your doorstep, and limited public transport options, so it’s great that we we have things here for young people to do.

“It could be that intersection in the road where they come along and have that conversation that could put them on a different path.”

The Weston drop-in centre will be open weekdays, with structured activities for under-12s on Tuesdays (3.30pm to 6pm); homework help and tutoring on Wednesdays (3.30pm to 4.30pm) and over-12s’ activities on Thursdays (3.30pm to 6pm).

Hunter Valley Outreach also run programs at East Cessnock Skate Park on Monday afternoons from 3.30pm to 6.30pm, and Kurri Skate Park on Friday nights from 5.30pm to 9pm.

Source: https://www.cessnockadvertiser.com.au/story/5246220/youth-drop-in-centre-opens-in-weston-photos/

 

TEACHERS

KURRI KURRI High’s innovative new teaching model could be replicated across the state, after the school’s staff held a conference to share their findings with 150 NSW teachers.

Principal Tracey Breese said teachers from across the Hunter, Sydney and as far away as Cobar and Wagga Wagga packed into Newcastle City Hall for the three day Project Nest conference, which is being held with support from UK based organisation EOS Education.

“Some of the teachers are completely gobsmacked with what we’ve done,” Ms Breese said. “It was a big jump off the cliff for my staff and community, but we’ve seen great results and such excitement in the year six kids who are coming to our school.”

Ms Breese joined the school mid-2016 and worked with staff and input from EOS Education to develop a new model of teaching, where year seven students attend classes for just three subjects underpinned by developing their literacy and numeracy skills: STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths), Quest (covering history, geography, English and art) and Lifestyle (comprising personal development, health and physical education, sport and health). Students learn from three teachers for each subject and in medium and small groups, depending on tasks. Students must then complete projects that demonstrate what they have learned. They don’t sit tests, except for NAPLAN. “The skillbase we’re giving students is about taking knowledge, using knowledge and representing it in a different way,” she said. “Kids are learning they have to be able to work with other people and to be responsible for and self regulate their own learning.”

Source: http://www.theherald.com.au/story/5000104/hunter-schools-program-leaves-nsw-teachers-gobsmacked/

1

As a soon-to-be college grad, I know that the world of work can catch you unawares. In preparing for the job search, I’ve found that experienced professionals often have a lot of great advice to dispense (also some not-so-great advice, but that’s an article for another day).

And it’s true that sometimes the wisest tips don’t come from experts, but from real people with real stories. So, with that in mind, The Muse team asked the LinkedIn community what wisdom they’d bestow on recent grads.

And upon reading all the tips, I couldn’t help but think that anyone—and really everyone—should read them, too. So with no further ado, here are my favorites:

1. Remember These Four Words

Be positive, principled, pro-active, and productive.

2. Discover Yourself

Consider this job a journey to learn about yourself. The purpose is to grow as a human being; to discover what you’re good at, what you love to do, and what you dislike.

Discover your why, and you’ll become happier and more passionate in life!

3. Be Open to Change

Don’t get discouraged when a job you really want does not pan out for you. It just opens up doors to other opportunities.

4. Don’t Hide From Mistakes

Be honest. Not sure about something? Ask questions. Screwed up? Own up!

I’ve always valued someone willing to learn, and we do that in different ways. I’ll always highly regard someone willing to be honest about their mistakes because we learn from those just as much as our successes!

5. Keep Moving Forward

Learn to hear feedback and never let it fester. Instead consider it, take what works, and move on.

6. Learn From Everything

Remember every moment is an opportunity to learn from everyone around you, no matter their title.

Pay attention when things go well; pay extra attention when they don’t, and watch how people react to it. Build relationships with the people who face problems by being their solution.

7. Make Connections

Your biggest asset is your network.

8. Be Patient

Networking + Resilience = Success

It won’t be easy but you have to start somewhere. This is just the first step on the stairwell, so don’t give up, and know that the best is yet to come!

9. Utilize Your Co-workers

Don’t be intimidated by your colleagues and superiors!

Remember that they were once in your shoes when they began their careers. Leverage their knowledge and experience and find ways to take what worked for them and adapt it to work for you.

10. Treat Everyone With Respect

Speak when you walk into the office everyday. Say good morning to your boss and peers as you walk past their offices, smile at janitors and receptionists in your office.

Don’t be so focused on getting ahead that it’s all business all the time. Treating people with humanity and integrity is most important.

11. Keep Your Own Counsel

Don’t assume that a co-worker won’t repeat your criticisms of a colleague. When asked how you feel about individuals in the office, be open and vague with your answers.

Always reserve judgment on your co-workers until you have enough time to make up your own mind.

12. Prepare for the Future

Develop good time management habits early on. Your workload will only increase with time, and so will your responsibilities. Be ready when they do.

From making the right impression to getting a handle on time management, a new work environment can be tricky to navigate. And, that goes for anyone, no matter how high up the ladder you are.
Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/12-pieces-of-advice-for-new-grads-that-everyone-should-take
ozgreen2

ALL Hunter Valley school students and youth groups are invited to join an innovative sustainability leadership training initiative provided by OzGREEN.

The Youth Leading the World program kicks off in Singleton on July 26 and 27 – and aims to equip young participants with leadership skills they can use to take action to create a better future for the region.

“The training helps youngsters identify environmental problems in their community, then develop and implement solutions with the support of local mentors, who we will invite from community groups,” OzGREEN trainer Lena Hammond said.

“We are providing scholarships for students in Years 6 – 12 so we are encouraging teachers, service clubs and youth group coordinators to register as soon as possible.

“We are also offering fully-funded training scholarships to community mentors working with the young people, in order to help them with project management and implementation.”

OzGREEN ambassador and one of the Hunter’s young community leaders, Aberdeen’s Katie Field, recently undertook the training.

“Without a doubt this OzGREEN training provided me with new skills and the motivation I needed to make a difference to the world around me,” she said.

“It also helped me gain a scholarship to attend university.

“It’s really exciting to know that more students and community members in the Hunter can have the same opportunity as I did.”

Ms Hammond said the event was an amazing opportunity for local young environmental leaders who want to make a difference in the world around them.

Schools, youth and community groups are invited to apply for this training as soon as possible.

The deadline for first round applications is July 1.

For more information, contact program manager Lena Hammond on 0416 011 598.

To find out more about the training, visit www.ozgreen.org/upcoming_events

From http://www.huntervalleynews.net.au/story/3957687/hunter-valley-youth-invited-to-local-sustainability-leadership-program/?cs=1457