Posts Tagged “everyone”

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Being stuck in a rut sucks. If there’s one thing I could wish for you, it’s that you never have to deal with a situation that holds you back from being happy, successful, or fulfilled.

That, unfortunately, is an unrealistic wish (even more unrealistic than wishing I could turn everything I touch into chocolate). Because like failure, ruts are inevitable. And the good news about that not-so-fun fact is that they ultimately help make us stronger, smarter, and more successful individuals.

Just look at a few people in your life who you admire—how many of them went through a struggle that forced them to reevaluate their goals or path?

Since I’m someone who doesn’t love surprises (except the birthday kind), I’m going to tell you right now exactly which ruts you’ll find yourself in throughout your career.

 

1. Being Bored
No matter how much you love your job, how many hours you work, or how large the pile of to-dos is on your desk, there will come a time when you will find yourself suddenly underwhelmed, unmotivated, or unstimulated at your job for days on end.

It could be for a number of reasons. Maybe your boss has stopped challenging you. Or, maybe you’re making the mistake of not seeking out challenges, or looking for exciting projects. Or, maybe you’ve found yourself in a new role that isn’t as exciting as you thought it would be.

Whatever the reason, boredom is usually pretty fixable. You can ask your boss for better projects, or see if you can chip in on what other teams are working on, or find ways to keep learning, like taking online classes or attending conferences related to your industry. If that still leaves you no better than you were before, it may be time to move on and find a role that’s more engaging.

2. Feeling Unhappy
Unhappiness is a more serious sign to keep an eye on.

Why is it so much more common than we realize? Because for one, we’re fickle beings—we’re always changing our minds and shifting our priorities. Which means the things we want in our careers now may change one, two, five years from now. That’s OK!

The other reason is because sometimes we’re really bad at recognizing when we’re miserable. We’ll place the blame on other things (woke up on the wrong side of the bed, had a bad commute, a crazy boss) rather than accept that something bigger is affecting us.Figure out what is making you unhappy and use that information to decide what your next steps will be.

Maybe it means transferring roles internally, changing companies, or switching industries entirely. Or maybe it’s even more simple than that. Maybe it’s talking to your boss about an overwhelming workload. Or asking your co-worker to stop talking to you when you’re working at your desk.

Whatever the cause, take the time to identify it and start making moves to solve it.

3. Doubting Your Career Path
Unless you’re very lucky, you won’t find yourself satisfied in the same role in the same industry throughout your entire career.

Don’t beat yourself up if you’re unsure about what you want to do next—even if you’ve spent 10 years in your role and are now doubting everything. The good news is that it’s never too late to make a change, whatever that means for you. The even better news is that you don’t have to have it all figured out when you’re 30, 40, 50.

As Benjamin Franklin said, “When you are finished changing, you’re finished.” Don’t be finished.

 

4. Feeling Like Nothing’s Going Right
Ever have those months when nothing’s going right? You keep messing up basic tasks, your manager keeps sending your work back with heavy revisions, your co-workers keep shutting down your ideas?

It could be your fault—if you’re job searching, for example, and getting nowhere, it might be worth reconsidering you’re approach.

But it could also be due to external forces, like a company restructuring or a bad boss. If so, it’s worth figuring out whether these can be fixed, and if not, what steps you can take to better set yourself up for success.

 

5. Having to Deal With a (Big) Change
Your company just went through a huge merger, half your department got laid off, you got laid off, they brought in a new boss, or oyou’ve moved to an entirely new city for a job.

One day, something major will happen that will shake up how you do things and think about your career. While it’s practically impossible to prepare for something like this, remember that it’s common. And, that it’s salvageable. And, that the feelings of loss and doubt and frustration and sadness won’t last forever. And, that you’ll come out stronger and more equipped to handle anything that comes your way. If you don’t believe me, read this.

 

The last thing I want to emphasize is that it’s easy to feel alone when you’re in these ruts, or that no one understands what you’re going through. But I can confidently tell you that everyone experiences these. Why else would I write this article?

So, don’t be afraid to admit when you’re in one—if you don’t, you’ll regret not making a change sooner. And if you still feel like the only one, chat with people just like you (and get some reassuring advice) on our Stuck in a Rut discussions platform.

Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/career-ruts-everyone-will-get-into-some-point?ref=recently-published-1

 

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As a soon-to-be college grad, I know that the world of work can catch you unawares. In preparing for the job search, I’ve found that experienced professionals often have a lot of great advice to dispense (also some not-so-great advice, but that’s an article for another day).

And it’s true that sometimes the wisest tips don’t come from experts, but from real people with real stories. So, with that in mind, The Muse team asked the LinkedIn community what wisdom they’d bestow on recent grads.

And upon reading all the tips, I couldn’t help but think that anyone—and really everyone—should read them, too. So with no further ado, here are my favorites:

1. Remember These Four Words

Be positive, principled, pro-active, and productive.

2. Discover Yourself

Consider this job a journey to learn about yourself. The purpose is to grow as a human being; to discover what you’re good at, what you love to do, and what you dislike.

Discover your why, and you’ll become happier and more passionate in life!

3. Be Open to Change

Don’t get discouraged when a job you really want does not pan out for you. It just opens up doors to other opportunities.

4. Don’t Hide From Mistakes

Be honest. Not sure about something? Ask questions. Screwed up? Own up!

I’ve always valued someone willing to learn, and we do that in different ways. I’ll always highly regard someone willing to be honest about their mistakes because we learn from those just as much as our successes!

5. Keep Moving Forward

Learn to hear feedback and never let it fester. Instead consider it, take what works, and move on.

6. Learn From Everything

Remember every moment is an opportunity to learn from everyone around you, no matter their title.

Pay attention when things go well; pay extra attention when they don’t, and watch how people react to it. Build relationships with the people who face problems by being their solution.

7. Make Connections

Your biggest asset is your network.

8. Be Patient

Networking + Resilience = Success

It won’t be easy but you have to start somewhere. This is just the first step on the stairwell, so don’t give up, and know that the best is yet to come!

9. Utilize Your Co-workers

Don’t be intimidated by your colleagues and superiors!

Remember that they were once in your shoes when they began their careers. Leverage their knowledge and experience and find ways to take what worked for them and adapt it to work for you.

10. Treat Everyone With Respect

Speak when you walk into the office everyday. Say good morning to your boss and peers as you walk past their offices, smile at janitors and receptionists in your office.

Don’t be so focused on getting ahead that it’s all business all the time. Treating people with humanity and integrity is most important.

11. Keep Your Own Counsel

Don’t assume that a co-worker won’t repeat your criticisms of a colleague. When asked how you feel about individuals in the office, be open and vague with your answers.

Always reserve judgment on your co-workers until you have enough time to make up your own mind.

12. Prepare for the Future

Develop good time management habits early on. Your workload will only increase with time, and so will your responsibilities. Be ready when they do.

From making the right impression to getting a handle on time management, a new work environment can be tricky to navigate. And, that goes for anyone, no matter how high up the ladder you are.
Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/12-pieces-of-advice-for-new-grads-that-everyone-should-take